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Re: shrinking rate

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  • afogassa
    Thank´s Marco i´ve measure the part and wall thickness is the same on both parts(normal and scaled part)it makes sense the more volume the more it will
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 16, 2013
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      Thank´s Marco i´ve measure the part and wall thickness is the same on both parts(normal and scaled part)it makes sense the more volume the more it will shrink. I think it won´t matter if I´m printing a box like with thin walls (scaling the part by the shrink rate) but it will make a big diference if i´ve a part that has both very thick wall and very thin wall on it.
      I did print a part that was like that and it got smaller on thick walls then on thin walls thus deforming the part by a considerable amount.
      i think the best thing is to keep all the walls the same thickness using a shell on the cad.

      --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Bedo <bedo@...> wrote:
      >
      > At 04.51 16/02/2013, you wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >I think that if the resin has a linear shrinking
      > >rate then the hole shoud get bigger as the
      > >outside of square would get smaller by the same amount in percentage.
      > >i remember working with some bondo resin in the
      > >past and had the same problem and never found a
      > >good explanation on resin shrinking on this kind of odd shrinking.
      > >i don´t think light bleeading can be account for
      > >it. if that was the case the square would always get bigger not smaller.
      >
      > hello all,
      > I'm reading this group since a long time but posted just a few,
      > so I jump in this discussion. As far as I know from my work, shrinkage
      > goes with material volume, not on overall
      > dimension, it works kind of both ways. If you
      > have a closed volume it will shrink of a % overall,
      > but if you have a hole in it, it will shrink both
      > in overall dimensions and "wall" thickness. So
      > the correct solution maybe a combination
      > of resizing and offset. Attached an image to
      > explain shrinkage directions. Also take in
      > account that thicker walls lead to bigger shrinkage
      > so the outside square also gets distorted by a
      > little bit if not supported by previous layers...
      >
      > ciao,
      > Marco.
      >
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