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RE: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: Hello

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  • joan raven
    I tried with 2012 ans 2011. But mainly happens this: The supports pass through the model till they reach the top surface of the model. Weird To:
    Message 1 of 44 , Feb 8, 2013
    I tried with 2012 ans 2011.

    But mainly happens this: The supports pass through the model till they reach the top surface of the model.

    Weird


    To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
    From: loquin.guillaume@...
    Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2013 18:45:24 +0000
    Subject: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: Hello

     
    Hello,

    That's weird! :) wich 3dsmax version do you have? Can you send me a screenshot please ?
    I think the .obj exporter messed up the pivot point of the supports.

    Thanks!
    --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, joan raven wrote:
    >
    >
    > Works but in weird manner....
    > The supports appears reversed, from the top of the object to the "sky".The support doesn't go from the plane to the object.
    > I can send pictures.
    > But this is gonna be amazing!!
    >
    > To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
    > From: loquin.guillaume@...
    > Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2013 16:33:45 +0000
    > Subject: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: Hello
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    > i think it will not work on gmax... but that's worth the try :)
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    > you can also download a 3dsmax trial.
    >
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    > Guillaume.
    >
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    >
    > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Graham Stabler wrote:
    >
    > >
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    > > Do you know if it will work in gmax if that still exists? I don't have 3ds
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    > > max and back in the day gmax was an alternative.
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    > > Graham
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    > > On Thu, Feb 7, 2013 at 3:56 PM, loquin.guillaume
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    > > wrote:
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    > > > **
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    > > > Hello,
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    > > >
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    > > > i just uploaded a first version of my support generation script to the
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    > > > Files section of the group.
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    > > > i would love to have comments from users.
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    > > > cheer,
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    > > > Guillaume.
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  • Paul
    Thanks Harvey, Plenty to read and digest, Paul On 11/01/2016 21:00, Harvey White madyn@dragonworks.info
    Message 44 of 44 , Jan 11, 2016
      Thanks Harvey,
      Plenty to read and digest,

      Paul

      On 11/01/2016 21:00, Harvey White madyn@... [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] wrote:
       

      On Mon, 11 Jan 2016 18:05:51 +0000, you wrote:

      >Thanks for the various answers, it seems I was applying my knowledge of
      >older CNC machine tools incorrectly,

      Not necessarily so. Servo systems excel in higher power and larger
      systems. Most industrial systems seem to be servo systems. Stepper
      systems (smaller, less expensive) are generally on smaller systems and
      do not necessarily have the same difficulties.

      Servos can run into a stop, and with full power on the motors, can
      stall, overheat, and burn out (without protection). A stalled stepper
      simply is stalled and cannot be damaged by having the shaft locked.

      On the other hand, neither system will be happy when the tool runs
      into the lathe chuck, or you drill into the mill table, or knock the
      plastic off the table.

      All depends on what you have experience with. I'd suggest Gecko as a
      good source of learning material (www.geckodrives.com I think). Very
      good people to deal with.

      Harvey

      >
      >Paul
      >
      >On 11/01/2016 01:01, Harvey White madyn@...
      >[diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] wrote:
      >>
      >> On Sun, 10 Jan 2016 15:48:00 -0800, you wrote:
      >>
      >> >The limit switch name is a bit of a misnomer. The switch is used once
      >> at the beginning of a print to tell the printer where zero position
      >> is. Once it knows where zero position is for each axis and it knows
      >> how big the axis is, it should never hit either end of the axis unless
      >> something is wrong. I don't know if the printer watches the limit
      >> switches during a print. I suspect it doesn't but will try it.
      >>
      >> There's actually three switches possible. Two are limit switches.
      >> They are designed to physically stop the motion of the printer. The X
      >> limit switch (at X0) keeps the printer from moving any further,
      >> although it could move X+. Similarly, the X limit (at Xmax) keeps the
      >> printer from going more in that direction, but will allow it to go
      >> towards X0. The home switch is placed close to the X0 switch, and is
      >> the arbitrary zero point for that axis. It does nothing other than to
      >> tell the software that this is the zero position. It generally does
      >> not stop carriage movement by hardware.
      >>
      >> In a minimalist approach, the X0 limit and Xhome switches have been
      >> combined, and the Xmax switch has been eliminated.
      >>
      >> The limit switches were intended to stop runaway servo systems, and
      >> are somewhat less useful in stepper systems, which cannot run away
      >> unless the software loses count of the steps. A servo system's
      >> software controller could crash and not stop the system in time.
      >>
      >> Harvey
      >>
      >> >
      >> >-----Original Message-----
      >> >From: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
      >> [mailto:diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com]
      >> >Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2016 11:36 AM
      >> >To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
      >> >Subject: Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Hello
      >> >
      >> >I would say that limit switches at one end is enough.
      >> >I have had a Huxley for 3 years, and never wanted shitches at the
      >> other end.
      >> >
      >> >Regards
      >> >Christer
      >> >
      >> >2016-01-10 18:43 GMT+01:00 paulbache@...
      >> [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] <
      >> >diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com>:
      >> >
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >> Hello to all from a new member, I have just purchased my first 3D
      >> >> printer (Prusa i3) from China, I expect I should have bought some
      >> >> other model but from the research I have done it appears to be able to
      >> >> what I want it to do, albeit with some minor upgrades, time will tell !
      >> >> looking forward to the assembly and subsequent calibration, this does
      >> >> not seem to difficult, my only concern is the lack of limit switches
      >> >> at the other end of the XYZ travel, does anyone have any experience of
      >> >> this design ? and am I being unduly worried ?
      >> >>
      >> >> Regards
      >> >> Paul
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >>
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >__________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus
      >> signature database 12847 (20160110) __________
      >> >
      >> >The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.
      >> >
      >> >http://www.eset.com
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >__________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus
      >> signature database 12847 (20160110) __________
      >> >
      >> >The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.
      >> >
      >> >http://www.eset.com
      >> >
      >> >
      >>
      >>


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