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Re: vibratory polisher for post processing

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  • richkang78
    Nice Brian, that is similar to one I was planning on purchasing. Do you know what type of media you will be using? Also, what type of plastic are you planning
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 1, 2013
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      Nice Brian, that is similar to one I was planning on purchasing.
      Do you know what type of media you will be using? Also, what type of plastic are you planning on processing? DLP-style acrylics or FDM flavors? I'd appreciate any info you can share regarding your experiences with the polisher.

      Thanks,
      Rich

      --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "BrianB" wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Here's the cheapest vibratory polisher I could find. However the backorder took for ever. It has finally shipped and I should get it next week.
      >
      > http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200578578_200578578
      >
      > Brian
      >
      > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Francis, that's a great suggestion.
      > > The reason I was asking about a "hands free" method was that I find it difficult to access all surfaces of my parts with sandpaper in hand. I do want to retain some finer features in my models, but mine are probably not that delicate such as in fine scale models such as yours. I could fabricate sanding tools to reach into crevices , but I was hoping that a vibratory polisher could do the work for me based on the medium size.
      > >
      > > Rich
      > >
      > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Francis Leach wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi
      > > > In my business in model locomotive build I use spray applied car primer
      > > > which fills the valleys between build layers.
      > > > It is allowed to harden and then rubbed down with wet & dry aghrasive
      > > > paper. Repeat as necessary to obtain an acceptable finish.
      > > > The task becomes difficult if the surface has small embellishments that
      > > > restrict the rub down process.
      > > > On 24 Jan 2013 19:48, "richkang78" wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > **
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Group,
      > > > >
      > > > > I am wondering if anyone has experience using a vibratory polisher to post
      > > > > process printed parts. The kind I am referring to is the same used to clean
      > > > > bullet casings. This is basically to clean up the fine "stair stepped"
      > > > > surface on parts. I can print at a higher z resolution to make these very
      > > > > very small, but at .003" per step, which allows for a reasonably fast print
      > > > > rate, the steps are more obvious and though not very noticeable, still
      > > > > effect the surface finish.
      > > > >
      > > > > My own research has led me to these types of potential tumbling media:
      > > > > 1)crushed walnut shell
      > > > > 2)hardwood media (various shapes)
      > > > > 3)plastic media (various shapes)
      > > > >
      > > > > Anyone have experience with an optimal medium?
      > > > >
      > > > > I understand that this type of processing will clearly erode unintended
      > > > > features of the part, but there appears to be few options to this other
      > > > > than hand sanding. I believe features that you do not want to have eroded
      > > > > can be coated with some type of protective layer (ie taping, caulking).
      > > > >
      > > > > Rich
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • richkang78
      Thanks for your response Peter. The polisher I have in mind seems to be quite different in operation from the magnetic polisher you describe. The vibratory
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 1, 2013
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        Thanks for your response Peter. The polisher I have in mind seems to be quite different in operation from the magnetic polisher you describe. The vibratory ones don't require liquid immersion, some suggest a few tablespoons of water added to media in certain instances. But many run dry media only. The grinding media can also be non-metallic/magnetic which would increase the range of choices for media hardness.

        Rich

        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "pzamov" wrote:
        >
        > @Group
        > I have a needle magnetic polisher for metals - mainly silver and gold.
        >
        > It uses 5mm X 0.3mm and 5mm X 0.5mm pins. There are 1mm available, but Cherry pits/ Plastic media/wood media is far too coarse for that kind of work.
        >
        > Also the parts will have to be submerged in Water/oil/alcohol for all this to work. Most resins have a great deal of problems with absorption or delamination from water/alcohol, so it is another problem that needs to be solved.
        >
        > For coarse work maybe it can work, but there is still the problem: In what media would you submerge the objects as it should not be a viscous.
        >
        > Cheers!
        >
        > Peter
        > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Group,
        > >
        > > I am wondering if anyone has experience using a vibratory polisher to post process printed parts. The kind I am referring to is the same used to clean bullet casings. This is basically to clean up the fine "stair stepped" surface on parts. I can print at a higher z resolution to make these very very small, but at .003" per step, which allows for a reasonably fast print rate, the steps are more obvious and though not very noticeable, still effect the surface finish.
        > >
        > > My own research has led me to these types of potential tumbling media:
        > > 1)crushed walnut shell
        > > 2)hardwood media (various shapes)
        > > 3)plastic media (various shapes)
        > >
        > > Anyone have experience with an optimal medium?
        > >
        > > I understand that this type of processing will clearly erode unintended features of the part, but there appears to be few options to this other than hand sanding. I believe features that you do not want to have eroded can be coated with some type of protective layer (ie taping, caulking).
        > >
        > > Rich
        > >
        >
      • cadcamtrav
        I left some viper parts I did at .001 in Amethyst resin in a vibratory shaker tumbler for a few months using walnut shells just for kicks. Sadly, no results
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 1, 2013
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          I left some viper parts I did at .001" in Amethyst resin in a vibratory shaker tumbler for a few months using walnut shells just for kicks. Sadly, no results at all. They just looked "dusty" for the lack of a better term. When I upped the media grit power I started breaking parts.



          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for your response Peter. The polisher I have in mind seems to be quite different in operation from the magnetic polisher you describe. The vibratory ones don't require liquid immersion, some suggest a few tablespoons of water added to media in certain instances. But many run dry media only. The grinding media can also be non-metallic/magnetic which would increase the range of choices for media hardness.
          >
          > Rich
          >
          > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "pzamov" wrote:
          > >
          > > @Group
          > > I have a needle magnetic polisher for metals - mainly silver and gold.
          > >
          > > It uses 5mm X 0.3mm and 5mm X 0.5mm pins. There are 1mm available, but Cherry pits/ Plastic media/wood media is far too coarse for that kind of work.
          > >
          > > Also the parts will have to be submerged in Water/oil/alcohol for all this to work. Most resins have a great deal of problems with absorption or delamination from water/alcohol, so it is another problem that needs to be solved.
          > >
          > > For coarse work maybe it can work, but there is still the problem: In what media would you submerge the objects as it should not be a viscous.
          > >
          > > Cheers!
          > >
          > > Peter
          > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi Group,
          > > >
          > > > I am wondering if anyone has experience using a vibratory polisher to post process printed parts. The kind I am referring to is the same used to clean bullet casings. This is basically to clean up the fine "stair stepped" surface on parts. I can print at a higher z resolution to make these very very small, but at .003" per step, which allows for a reasonably fast print rate, the steps are more obvious and though not very noticeable, still effect the surface finish.
          > > >
          > > > My own research has led me to these types of potential tumbling media:
          > > > 1)crushed walnut shell
          > > > 2)hardwood media (various shapes)
          > > > 3)plastic media (various shapes)
          > > >
          > > > Anyone have experience with an optimal medium?
          > > >
          > > > I understand that this type of processing will clearly erode unintended features of the part, but there appears to be few options to this other than hand sanding. I believe features that you do not want to have eroded can be coated with some type of protective layer (ie taping, caulking).
          > > >
          > > > Rich
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • richkang78
          You left the parts in shaker for a few months? That sounds like an extremely long time! I think those who clean/polish brass shells don t usually exceed 2
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 5, 2013
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            You left the parts in shaker for a few months? That sounds like an extremely long time! I think those who clean/polish brass shells don't usually exceed 2 days with walnut. But the fact that you didn't see any results is surprising. Thanks for the info!

            Rich

            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "cadcamtrav" wrote:
            >
            > I left some viper parts I did at .001" in Amethyst resin in a vibratory shaker tumbler for a few months using walnut shells just for kicks. Sadly, no results at all. They just looked "dusty" for the lack of a better term. When I upped the media grit power I started breaking parts.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
            > >
            > > Thanks for your response Peter. The polisher I have in mind seems to be quite different in operation from the magnetic polisher you describe. The vibratory ones don't require liquid immersion, some suggest a few tablespoons of water added to media in certain instances. But many run dry media only. The grinding media can also be non-metallic/magnetic which would increase the range of choices for media hardness.
            > >
            > > Rich
            > >
            > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "pzamov" wrote:
            > > >
            > > > @Group
            > > > I have a needle magnetic polisher for metals - mainly silver and gold.
            > > >
            > > > It uses 5mm X 0.3mm and 5mm X 0.5mm pins. There are 1mm available, but Cherry pits/ Plastic media/wood media is far too coarse for that kind of work.
            > > >
            > > > Also the parts will have to be submerged in Water/oil/alcohol for all this to work. Most resins have a great deal of problems with absorption or delamination from water/alcohol, so it is another problem that needs to be solved.
            > > >
            > > > For coarse work maybe it can work, but there is still the problem: In what media would you submerge the objects as it should not be a viscous.
            > > >
            > > > Cheers!
            > > >
            > > > Peter
            > > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Hi Group,
            > > > >
            > > > > I am wondering if anyone has experience using a vibratory polisher to post process printed parts. The kind I am referring to is the same used to clean bullet casings. This is basically to clean up the fine "stair stepped" surface on parts. I can print at a higher z resolution to make these very very small, but at .003" per step, which allows for a reasonably fast print rate, the steps are more obvious and though not very noticeable, still effect the surface finish.
            > > > >
            > > > > My own research has led me to these types of potential tumbling media:
            > > > > 1)crushed walnut shell
            > > > > 2)hardwood media (various shapes)
            > > > > 3)plastic media (various shapes)
            > > > >
            > > > > Anyone have experience with an optimal medium?
            > > > >
            > > > > I understand that this type of processing will clearly erode unintended features of the part, but there appears to be few options to this other than hand sanding. I believe features that you do not want to have eroded can be coated with some type of protective layer (ie taping, caulking).
            > > > >
            > > > > Rich
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • travis serio
            Yeah I had an old shaker that we werent using and just tossed them in there to see if and or how long it would take. It became a bit of a game after awhile.
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 5, 2013
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              Yeah I had an old shaker that we werent using and just tossed them in there to see if and or how long it would take. It became a bit of a game after awhile. 


              On Tue, Feb 5, 2013 at 3:14 PM, richkang78 <richkang78@...> wrote:
               

              You left the parts in shaker for a few months? That sounds like an extremely long time! I think those who clean/polish brass shells don't usually exceed 2 days with walnut. But the fact that you didn't see any results is surprising. Thanks for the info!

              Rich

              --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "cadcamtrav" wrote:
              >
              > I left some viper parts I did at .001" in Amethyst resin in a vibratory shaker tumbler for a few months using walnut shells just for kicks. Sadly, no results at all. They just looked "dusty" for the lack of a better term. When I upped the media grit power I started breaking parts.
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
              > >
              > > Thanks for your response Peter. The polisher I have in mind seems to be quite different in operation from the magnetic polisher you describe. The vibratory ones don't require liquid immersion, some suggest a few tablespoons of water added to media in certain instances. But many run dry media only. The grinding media can also be non-metallic/magnetic which would increase the range of choices for media hardness.
              > >
              > > Rich
              > >
              > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "pzamov" wrote:
              > > >
              > > > @Group
              > > > I have a needle magnetic polisher for metals - mainly silver and gold.
              > > >
              > > > It uses 5mm X 0.3mm and 5mm X 0.5mm pins. There are 1mm available, but Cherry pits/ Plastic media/wood media is far too coarse for that kind of work.
              > > >
              > > > Also the parts will have to be submerged in Water/oil/alcohol for all this to work. Most resins have a great deal of problems with absorption or delamination from water/alcohol, so it is another problem that needs to be solved.
              > > >
              > > > For coarse work maybe it can work, but there is still the problem: In what media would you submerge the objects as it should not be a viscous.
              > > >
              > > > Cheers!
              > > >
              > > > Peter
              > > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Hi Group,
              > > > >
              > > > > I am wondering if anyone has experience using a vibratory polisher to post process printed parts. The kind I am referring to is the same used to clean bullet casings. This is basically to clean up the fine "stair stepped" surface on parts. I can print at a higher z resolution to make these very very small, but at .003" per step, which allows for a reasonably fast print rate, the steps are more obvious and though not very noticeable, still effect the surface finish.
              > > > >
              > > > > My own research has led me to these types of potential tumbling media:
              > > > > 1)crushed walnut shell
              > > > > 2)hardwood media (various shapes)
              > > > > 3)plastic media (various shapes)
              > > > >
              > > > > Anyone have experience with an optimal medium?
              > > > >
              > > > > I understand that this type of processing will clearly erode unintended features of the part, but there appears to be few options to this other than hand sanding. I believe features that you do not want to have eroded can be coated with some type of protective layer (ie taping, caulking).
              > > > >
              > > > > Rich
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >


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