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Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] patents? You haven't seen anything yet... [1 Attachment]

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  • Jon Elson
    ... Thanks, Graham! This seems to be the operative claim of infringement. ... But, if formlabs is not doing this partial cure trick, then it seems the whole
    Message 1 of 41 , Nov 22, 2012
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      Graham Stabler wrote:
      >
      Thanks, Graham! This seems to be the operative claim of infringement.
      >
      > 17. Upon information and belief, Formlabs and it sales agent
      > Kickstarter knew or
      > should have known about, or were willfully blind to, 3D Systems'
      > extensive patent rights in the
      > area of three-dimensional printing and stereolithography, including
      > but not limited to 3D
      > Systems' U.S. Patent No. 5,597,520 covering improved methods of
      > stereolithographically
      > forming a three-dimensional object by forming cross-sectional layers
      > of an object from a
      > material capable of physical transformation upon exposure to
      > synergistic stimulation, by virtue
      > of their sales of machines touted by Formlabs as using
      > "stereolithography (SL) technology,"
      > which is a technology invented and extensively patented by 3D Systems
      > and its founder Charles
      > Hull.
      But, if formlabs is not doing this partial cure trick, then it seems the
      whole suit
      is invalid, just my reading of it.

      Jon
    • Jon Elson
      ... The specific patent they refer to by number deals with some kind of partial hardening of the resin to support overhangs. I m not sure if that partially
      Message 41 of 41 , Nov 25, 2012
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        Kenneth Lerman wrote:
        >
        > One thing I noticed in the complaint was a section saying that there
        > was no non-infringing use of the allegedly infringing device. Since
        > the patent under discussion seems to relate to exposure for supports,
        > it is clear that making objects that don't require support would be a
        > non-infringing use.
        The specific patent they refer to by number deals with some kind of
        partial hardening
        of the resin to support overhangs. I'm not sure if that partially
        hardened stuff is later
        dissolved, scraped away, or hardens completely later. But, it seems to
        deal with
        a very specific concept that I doubt formlabs is using. So, at least to
        my reading,
        it is not dealing with ordinary support structures, but something more
        specialized
        to support overhangs WITHOUT dedicated support structure from the bottom
        up. This directing the court to a SPECIFIC patent, while only mentioning
        that there are others, might be enough to scotch the whole suit. (I
        hope so,
        but I'm NOT a lawyer.)

        Jon
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