Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Bar Code Printers

Expand Messages
  • vrsculptor
    Just a thought. There are an amazing variety of barcode printers out there. These printers include, heads, ink supplies and electronics to print images on
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 30, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Just a thought. There are an amazing variety of barcode printers out there. These printers include, heads, ink supplies and electronics to print images on boxes and such, some of them at very high DPI, that are flying by on a belt. As all production lines are different The electronics must be very easy to interface to. They must sense the speed and position of objects on the line in order to synchronize their printing. The print heads are rated for years of service and are ink agnostic.

      If you used a barcode printer as the basis for a 3D printer you could simulate the production line as a pass from left to right on the page. At the end of the sweep you would advance the page a print head width and repeat. This would sure simplify the printers electronics and allow you to make a page as big as you wanted. Sure beats hacking HP boards and dealing with the printer's feed dance, cleaning cycles and such.

      Cost is probably an issue. An XAAR print head is about $250 but comes ready to attach to an ink tank. I don't have a guess what the electronics cost. Even if it cost a couple of thousand for the pieces you might still be way better off with a simple industrial based machine that you can completely understand and is maintainable than buying an old Z-Corp printer. First Z-Corp breakdown could cost more than the barcode printer parts.

      Maybe someone here has experience with these printers?

      Roger
    • Steve
      Since the Z-Corp, and incidentally at least one of the barcode printers that I m aware of, uses HP heads, why not just use HP heads? I think I ve said it
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 31, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Since the Z-Corp, and incidentally at least one of the barcode printers that I'm aware of, uses HP heads, why not just use HP heads? I think I've said it before... the black HP heads can use pigmented or dye inks. HP's wide format printers often use the same heads for all four colors that the desktop use just for black, as do/did Encad printers.

        They are refillable, adaptable to a CIS, and if one develops an unsaveable clog, easy to replace. HP has been selling the 29 and 15/45 cartridges for years and years. The 45 is a higher capacity (same physical size) than the 15.

        Steve Greenfield



        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "vrsculptor" <vrsculptor@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just a thought. There are an amazing variety of barcode printers out there. These printers include, heads, ink supplies and electronics to print images on boxes and such, some of them at very high DPI, that are flying by on a belt. As all production lines are different The electronics must be very easy to interface to. They must sense the speed and position of objects on the line in order to synchronize their printing. The print heads are rated for years of service and are ink agnostic.
        >
        > If you used a barcode printer as the basis for a 3D printer you could simulate the production line as a pass from left to right on the page. At the end of the sweep you would advance the page a print head width and repeat. This would sure simplify the printers electronics and allow you to make a page as big as you wanted. Sure beats hacking HP boards and dealing with the printer's feed dance, cleaning cycles and such.
        >
        > Cost is probably an issue. An XAAR print head is about $250 but comes ready to attach to an ink tank. I don't have a guess what the electronics cost. Even if it cost a couple of thousand for the pieces you might still be way better off with a simple industrial based machine that you can completely understand and is maintainable than buying an old Z-Corp printer. First Z-Corp breakdown could cost more than the barcode printer parts.
        >
        > Maybe someone here has experience with these printers?
        >
        > Roger
        >
      • Jack
        What is the HP cartridge number that Z-corp uses? For a DIYer, what kind of electronics does it take to drive one?
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 31, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          What is the 'HP cartridge number' that Z-corp uses?  For a DIYer, what kind of electronics does it take to drive one?
          ><> ... Jack


          On Fri, Jul 31, 2009 at 1:16 PM, Steve <alienrelics@...> wrote:
          Since the Z-Corp, and incidentally at least one of the barcode printers that I'm aware of, uses HP heads, why not just use HP heads? I think I've said it before... the black HP heads can use pigmented or dye inks. HP's wide format printers often use the same heads for all four colors that the desktop use just for black, as do/did Encad printers.

          They are refillable, adaptable to a CIS, and if one develops an unsaveable clog, easy to replace. HP has been selling the 29 and 15/45 cartridges for years and years. The 45 is a higher capacity (same physical size) than the 15.

          Steve Greenfield



          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "vrsculptor" <vrsculptor@...> wrote:
          >
          > Just a thought. There are an amazing variety of barcode printers out there. These printers include, heads, ink supplies and electronics to print images on boxes and such, some of them at very high DPI, that are flying by on a belt. As all production lines are different The electronics must be very easy to interface to. They must sense the speed and position of objects on the line in order to synchronize their printing. The print heads are rated for years of service and are ink agnostic.
          >
          > If you used a barcode printer as the basis for a 3D printer you could simulate the production line as a pass from left to right on the page. At the end of the sweep you would advance the page a print head width and repeat. This would sure simplify the printers electronics and allow you to make a page as big as you wanted. Sure beats hacking HP boards and dealing with the printer's feed dance, cleaning cycles and such.
          >
          > Cost is probably an issue. An XAAR print head is about $250 but comes ready to attach to an ink tank. I don't have a guess what the electronics cost. Even if it cost a couple of thousand for the pieces you might still be way better off with a simple industrial based machine that you can completely understand and is maintainable than buying an old Z-Corp printer. First Z-Corp breakdown could cost more than the barcode printer parts.
          >
          > Maybe someone here has experience with these printers?
          >
          > Roger
          >




          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
             http://groups.yahoo.com/group/diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication/

          <*> Your email settings:
             Individual Email | Traditional

          <*> To change settings online go to:
             http://groups.yahoo.com/group/diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication/join
             (Yahoo! ID required)

          <*> To change settings via email:
             mailto:diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication-digest@yahoogroups.com
             mailto:diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

          <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
             diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
             http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


        • vrsculptor
          Jack, I think most people are just trying to use the existing printers electronics and Windows software. The task of rasterizing an image and handling the
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 31, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Jack,
            I think most people are just trying to use the existing printers electronics and Windows software. The task of rasterizing an image and handling the print head timing must not be easy or more people would be doing it directly.

            HP makes a board available to OEM's that may do all of this, the C8855B <http://sysdoc.doors.ch/HP/5981-9512ENE.pdf> for use in their bulk printing systems <http://www.superiorcasecoding.com/downloads/HP_Bulk_Ink_Delivery_System_Revised.pdf>.

            I don't know if any of this is available to the public.

            Roger

            > What is the 'HP cartridge number' that Z-corp uses? For a DIYer, what kind
            > of electronics does it take to drive one?
            > ><> ... Jack
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.