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385nm 1W UV LED curing results

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  • Marc Bechamp
    Hi, I ve receive my 1W UV LED, http://www.ebay.ca/itm/261010727388?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_3658wt_1108 . I put 1 drop of resin
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 5 11:28 AM
      Hi, 


      I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

      This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

      Marc


    • jsangiolo@ymail.com
      Excellent. what do you think about sticking that LED on one side of your LCD (in the projector) and the slide on the other side and seeing if that cures
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 5 12:02 PM
        Excellent.

        what do you think about sticking that LED on one side of your LCD (in the projector) and the slide on the other side and seeing if that cures relatively quickly? or maybe stick the LED about 1-2 inches away to spread the energy over about the same area as you might use in a DLP print and see how fast that cures?

        john


        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I've receive my 1W UV LED,
        > http://www.ebay.ca/itm/261010727388?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_3658wt_1108
        > .
        >
        > I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED
        > light. It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.
        > I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of
        > your photons are of the proper frequency.
        >
        > This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the
        > post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.
        >
        > Marc
        >
      • Robert Cervellione
        can you tell me how big the LED is, i do not see dimensions on the ebay site.
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 5 12:29 PM
          can you tell me how big the LED is, i do not see dimensions on the ebay site. 
        • Marc Bechamp
          With the aluminum base it s 20mm. It is easy to desolder the actual LED and it s 8mm but you still need to attach it to a heat sink if you do that. There are
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 5 1:08 PM
            With the aluminum base it's 20mm.  It is easy to desolder the actual LED and it's 8mm but you still need to attach it to a heat sink if you do that.

            There are 3W, 5W and 10W  LEDs available also.

            Marc



            On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 3:29 PM, Robert Cervellione <robert.cervellione@...> wrote:
             

            can you tell me how big the LED is, i do not see dimensions on the ebay site. 


          • Robert Cervellione
            thanks for the info -robert
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 5 1:16 PM
              thanks for the info

              -robert
            • Marc Bechamp
              I would give it a try but that would only prove the light passes the liquid crystal. Closer to DLP curing is just collimating the light and exposing a couple
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 5 1:17 PM
                I would give it a try but that would only prove the light passes the liquid crystal.    

                Closer to DLP curing is just collimating the light and exposing a couple inches away.  The emitting angle of the LED is 110 degrees so I lose too much light if i'm far away.  I have 8 and 15 degree LED lenses and I plan on trying that tomorrow.  

                Also, this is a 1W LED and they have more powerful available.  Anybody know if the improvement would be linear or exponential with a more powerful LED?

                Marc



                On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 3:02 PM, jsangiolo@... <john_sangiolo@...> wrote:
                 

                Excellent.

                what do you think about sticking that LED on one side of your LCD (in the projector) and the slide on the other side and seeing if that cures relatively quickly? or maybe stick the LED about 1-2 inches away to spread the energy over about the same area as you might use in a DLP print and see how fast that cures?

                john

                --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi,
                >
                > I've receive my 1W UV LED,
                > http://www.ebay.ca/itm/261010727388?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_3658wt_1108
                > .
                >
                > I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED
                > light. It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.
                > I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of
                > your photons are of the proper frequency.
                >
                > This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the
                > post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.
                >
                > Marc
                >


              • Boman33
                Marc, Unfortunately, 1W UV LED written by marketing people is not meaningful. What is the actual optical power? It is not specified on eBay. The voltage
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 5 1:19 PM

                  Marc,

                  Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                  What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                  The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                   

                  I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                  Bertho

                   

                  From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                  Hi, 

                   

                   

                  I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                   

                  This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                   

                  Marc

                • Marc Bechamp
                  The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I m not sure I would even trust that. The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 5 2:24 PM
                    The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I'm not sure I would even trust that.  The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW for 1W.  It does cure fast and I'll give you results 2-3 inches away tomorrow.  May not be impressive...

                    Marc



                    On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 4:19 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:
                     

                    Marc,

                    Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                    What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                    The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                     

                    I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                    Bertho

                     

                    From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                    Hi, 

                     

                     

                    I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                     

                    This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                     

                    Marc


                  • Graham Stabler
                    Well they may not be 1W but I can bet they are hellishly bright. A few inches away it is perhaps not suprising a thin layer of resin can be cured quickly.
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jun 5 2:26 PM
                      Well they may not be 1W but I can bet they are hellishly bright. A few inches away it is perhaps not suprising a thin layer of resin can be cured quickly. Should be great for post cure "ovens".

                      Graham


                      On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 10:24 PM, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:
                       

                      The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I'm not sure I would even trust that.  The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW for 1W.  It does cure fast and I'll give you results 2-3 inches away tomorrow.  May not be impressive...


                      Marc



                      On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 4:19 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:
                       

                      Marc,

                      Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                      What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                      The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                       

                      I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                      Bertho

                       

                      From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                      Hi, 

                       

                       

                      I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                       

                      This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                       

                      Marc



                    • Boman33
                      My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that wavelength. The
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jun 5 3:33 PM

                        My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that wavelength.

                         

                        The eBay specification for UV output in lumens does not make sense.  Lumens are related to visual light output, not UV radiation.

                        Bertho

                         

                        From:  Graham Stabler   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 17:27

                        Well they may not be 1W but I can bet they are hellishly bright. A few inches away it is perhaps not suprising a thin layer of resin can be cured quickly. Should be great for post cure "ovens".

                        Graham

                        On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 10:24 PM, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:

                        The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I'm not sure I would even trust that.  The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW for 1W.  It does cure fast and I'll give you results 2-3 inches away tomorrow.  May not be impressive...

                        Marc

                        On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 4:19 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:

                        Marc,

                        Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                        What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                        The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                        I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                        Bertho

                         From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                        Hi, 

                         I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                         This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                         Marc

                      • Graham Stabler
                        OK they might not look bright but they will be putting out a serious amount of light (for an LED) if other more visible 5W leds are anything to go by. Graham
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jun 5 3:37 PM
                          OK they might not look bright but they will be putting out a serious amount of light (for an LED) if other more visible 5W leds are anything to go by.

                          Graham

                          On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 11:33 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:
                           

                          My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that wavelength.

                           

                          The eBay specification for UV output in lumens does not make sense.  Lumens are related to visual light output, not UV radiation.

                          Bertho

                           

                          From:  Graham Stabler   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 17:27

                          Well they may not be 1W but I can bet they are hellishly bright. A few inches away it is perhaps not suprising a thin layer of resin can be cured quickly. Should be great for post cure "ovens".

                          Graham

                          On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 10:24 PM, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:

                          The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I'm not sure I would even trust that.  The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW for 1W.  It does cure fast and I'll give you results 2-3 inches away tomorrow.  May not be impressive...

                          Marc

                          On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 4:19 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:

                          Marc,

                          Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                          What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                          The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                          I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                          Bertho

                           From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                          Hi, 

                           I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                           This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                           Marc


                        • Marc Bechamp
                          Yes, 1W is pretty dim violet. I can stare at it... Marc ... Yes, 1W is pretty dim violet.  I can stare at it... Marc On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 6:33 PM, Boman33
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jun 5 3:50 PM
                            Yes, 1W is pretty dim violet.  I can stare at it...

                            Marc




                            On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 6:33 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:
                             

                            My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that wavelength.

                             

                            The eBay specification for UV output in lumens does not make sense.  Lumens are related to visual light output, not UV radiation.

                            Bertho

                             

                            From:  Graham Stabler   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 17:27

                            Well they may not be 1W but I can bet they are hellishly bright. A few inches away it is perhaps not suprising a thin layer of resin can be cured quickly. Should be great for post cure "ovens".

                            Graham

                            On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 10:24 PM, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:

                            The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I'm not sure I would even trust that.  The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW for 1W.  It does cure fast and I'll give you results 2-3 inches away tomorrow.  May not be impressive...

                            Marc

                            On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 4:19 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:

                            Marc,

                            Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                            What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                            The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                            I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                            Bertho

                             From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                            Hi, 

                             I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                             This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                             Marc


                          • Graham Stabler
                            But I don t think you should Graham ... But I don t think you should Graham On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 11:50 PM, Marc Bechamp wrote:  
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jun 5 3:51 PM
                              But I don't think you should

                              Graham

                              On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 11:50 PM, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:
                               

                              Yes, 1W is pretty dim violet.  I can stare at it...


                              Marc




                              On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 6:33 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:
                               

                              My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that wavelength.

                               

                              The eBay specification for UV output in lumens does not make sense.  Lumens are related to visual light output, not UV radiation.

                              Bertho

                               

                              From:  Graham Stabler   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 17:27

                              Well they may not be 1W but I can bet they are hellishly bright. A few inches away it is perhaps not suprising a thin layer of resin can be cured quickly. Should be great for post cure "ovens".

                              Graham

                              On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 10:24 PM, Marc Bechamp <marcbechamp@...> wrote:

                              The eBay listing quotes 40-50 lumens but I'm not sure I would even trust that.  The 5W one quotes 400-600mW luminous intensity, which would suggest 80-120mW for 1W.  It does cure fast and I'll give you results 2-3 inches away tomorrow.  May not be impressive...

                              Marc

                              On Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 4:19 PM, Boman33 <boman33@...> wrote:

                              Marc,

                              Unfortunately, “1W UV LED” written by  marketing people is not meaningful.

                              What is the actual optical power?  It is not specified on eBay.

                              The voltage across the diode and current calculates to be 1 W electrical power.  The actual UV emitted is a small percentage of that.

                              I got a similar but 5W (electrical input) UV diode and the actual output is only a fraction of a Watt.  I am using it for curing some epoxies, not DLP applications.

                              Bertho

                               From:  Marc Bechamp   Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 14:28
                              Hi, 

                               I put 1 drop of resin between 2 sheets of glass and exposed it to the LED light.  It cured faster than I've managed to achieve with my DLP projector.  I see this as confirmation that you do not need much power when all of your photons are of the proper frequency.

                               This could also be an interesting post-curing method, specially if the post-cure container is filled with a gas like CO2 or N2.

                               Marc



                            • Jon Elson
                              ... My GOD, don t fool around with this! These devices are quite dangerous, even more so as you can t see how bright they are! ... Yes, just more proof they
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jun 5 7:30 PM
                                Boman33 wrote:
                                >
                                > My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it
                                > and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that
                                > wavelength.
                                >
                                My GOD, don't fool around with this! These devices are quite dangerous,
                                even more so as you
                                can't see how bright they are!
                                >
                                > The eBay specification for UV output in lumens does not make sense.
                                > Lumens are related to visual light output, not UV radiation.
                                >
                                Yes, just more proof they don't have any IDEA what they are talking about.

                                Jon
                              • Boman33
                                I am OK Jon. Thanks though. I have UV safety glasses when needed. I have been fooling around with UV on and off for many years. Initially dissecting mercury
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jun 5 7:57 PM

                                  I am OK Jon.  Thanks though. I have UV safety glasses when needed.

                                  I have been fooling around with UV on and off for many years.  Initially dissecting mercury lamps by removing the outside glass envelop to avoid the UV filtering.  I later got some commercial 200W UV systems that I used for PCB prototypes.

                                  Then there is the big one:  I built a 10kW DC carbon arc lamp.  Talk about bright light and lots of UV.  It is neat though when running, just a slight hiss since it DC.  I cannot run it too long since the room gets too hotJ

                                   

                                  I also designed a high power LED driver circuit for a customer and I got some 60W (yes, sixty Watt) LEDs that I used for testing.  Minimal UV but an extreme amount of light!  The LED is mounted on a PC microprocessor heatsink with a fan.

                                  Bertho

                                   

                                  From:  Jon Elson  Sent: Tuesday, June 05, 2012 22:30

                                  Boman33 wrote:

                                  >
                                  > My 5W electrical 385nm is not bright at all momentarily looking at it
                                  > and I do not expect it to be since my eyes basically will not see that
                                  > wavelength.
                                  >
                                  My GOD, don't fool around with this! These devices are quite dangerous,
                                  even more so as you can't see how bright they are!
                                  >
                                  > The eBay specification for UV output in lumens does not make sense.
                                  > Lumens are related to visual light output, not UV radiation.
                                  >
                                  Yes, just more proof they don't have any IDEA what they are talking about.

                                  Jon

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