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Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: Bapo question

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  • Jon Elson
    ... How can this possibly work? The light has to pass through the resin to get to the point of focus. It will also cure all the resin before it reaches the
    Message 1 of 30 , Feb 1, 2012
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      Spacecaptain wrote:
      >
      > But following the idea you both metioned about the constant pull: how
      > hard could it be to focus the image on a plane a number of mm above
      > the glass plane? Would this mean that a higher irradiance value is
      > delivered at that higher plane than the lower ones, closer to the
      > glass plane? Could this way the curing be made to happen on the bottom
      > of the object before than at the layer immediately above the glass plane?
      >
      How can this possibly work? The light has to pass through the resin to
      get to the
      point of focus. It will also cure all the resin before it reaches the
      focal plane.

      Jon
    • Spacecaptain
      Yes I just don t see how that would be possible. Actually, I think the bottom up version in a large vat may be the solution here: Constantly lower the platform
      Message 2 of 30 , Feb 2, 2012
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        Yes I just don't see how that would be possible.
        Actually, I think the bottom up version in a large vat may be the solution here:

        Constantly lower the platform while you are illuminating (intepolated?) slices from above.
        For this, the resin needs to be insensible to Oxygen inhibition so that you can cure the layer right at the top of the vat.
        You may need a squeegee to wipe a consistently thick new layer of resin on top of the sunken object though...
        Low viscosity resin is a must also...

        I got a challenge cut out for me there :)


        On 02/02/2012 03:42 AM, Jon Elson wrote:
         

        Spacecaptain wrote:
        >
        > But following the idea you both metioned about the constant pull: how
        > hard could it be to focus the image on a plane a number of mm above
        > the glass plane? Would this mean that a higher irradiance value is
        > delivered at that higher plane than the lower ones, closer to the
        > glass plane? Could this way the curing be made to happen on the bottom
        > of the object before than at the layer immediately above the glass plane?
        >
        How can this possibly work? The light has to pass through the resin to
        get to the
        point of focus. It will also cure all the resin before it reaches the
        focal plane.

        Jon


      • Michael Couch
        Here s an idea I m am hereby open sourcing to everyone, but I did not think it was that good when it occurred to me... What if we found a clear liquid that
        Message 3 of 30 , Feb 2, 2012
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          Here's an idea I'm am hereby open sourcing to everyone, but I did not think it was that good when it occurred to me...

          What if we found a clear liquid that would settle in the bottom of the vat and not interact with the UV Cure resin fluid? Something very clear and very viscous? Kayro Syrup maybe?

          Then you would position the substrate glass very carefully just above the juction of the fluids and raise it x microns etc.

          Michael Couch

          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Michael Joyce <MikeJ@...> wrote:
          >
          > Yes, those photons are all hitting the resin at the contact surface
          > first (actually MORE concentrated since the illuminated area decreases
          > as the focal plane moves away from the contact surface).
          > Plus that resin is in motion, flowing inwards to fill the area voided by
          > the upward motion. Can't see how that would work?
          >
          > MikeJ
          >
          > On 2/1/2012 2:41 PM, Spacecaptain wrote:
          > > My impression here is that curing rate is controlled by photon flux
          > > per area and doesn't care about focus at all.
          >
          > --
          > "Measure Twice, Cut Once"
          > http://www.B9Creations.com
          >
        • John
          Interesting idea. I remember back in the day, I had to add fuser oil to the xerox copiers. It was this super slimy clear goo the thickness of heavy motor oil.
          Message 4 of 30 , Feb 2, 2012
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            Interesting idea.
            I remember back in the day, I had to add fuser oil to the xerox copiers. It was this super slimy clear goo the thickness of heavy motor oil. I think it was silicon based. Watch out if you spilled any on the linoleum! It made about as close to a frictionless surface as i've ever seen. If something like that didn't react with or inhibit polymerization and had a high enough specific gravity compared to the resin to stay separated (like oil and water)it might work, if the suction of the rising platform didn't cause enough agitation to mix the two.


            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Couch" <cmichaelcouch@...> wrote:
            > What if we found a clear liquid that would settle in the bottom of the vat and not interact with the UV Cure resin fluid? Something very clear and very viscous? Kayro Syrup maybe?
            >
          • pzamov
            @Michael Couch - There is already a patent for that. PZ.
            Message 5 of 30 , Feb 2, 2012
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              @Michael Couch - There is already a patent for that.


              PZ.

              --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Couch" <cmichaelcouch@...> wrote:
              >
              > Here's an idea I'm am hereby open sourcing to everyone, but I did not think it was that good when it occurred to me...
              >
              > What if we found a clear liquid that would settle in the bottom of the vat and not interact with the UV Cure resin fluid? Something very clear and very viscous? Kayro Syrup maybe?
              >
              > Then you would position the substrate glass very carefully just above the juction of the fluids and raise it x microns etc.
              >
              > Michael Couch
              >
              > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Michael Joyce <MikeJ@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Yes, those photons are all hitting the resin at the contact surface
              > > first (actually MORE concentrated since the illuminated area decreases
              > > as the focal plane moves away from the contact surface).
              > > Plus that resin is in motion, flowing inwards to fill the area voided by
              > > the upward motion. Can't see how that would work?
              > >
              > > MikeJ
              > >
              > > On 2/1/2012 2:41 PM, Spacecaptain wrote:
              > > > My impression here is that curing rate is controlled by photon flux
              > > > per area and doesn't care about focus at all.
              > >
              > > --
              > > "Measure Twice, Cut Once"
              > > http://www.B9Creations.com
              > >
              >
            • Jon Elson
              ... Well, the real question is, does it work? If so, it might actually be possible to make a continuous build! The vertical stage just steadily rises while
              Message 6 of 30 , Feb 3, 2012
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                pzamov wrote:
                > @Michael Couch - There is already a patent for that.
                >
                Well, the real question is, does it work? If so, it might actually be
                possible
                to make a continuous build! The vertical stage just steadily rises
                while the
                series of images is continuously projected without turning off in between
                them.

                But, I have doubts that there is anything with a high enough density that
                it will stay totally flat on the bottom without distortion as the model
                is raised.

                Jon
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