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Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Acceptable Resolution of printers

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  • Spacecaptain
    Be sure to keep us posted! I like your intention of wanting to print big structural parts. I think that s an application that is rarely addressed in 3D
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 6, 2012
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      Be sure to keep us posted! I like your intention of wanting to print big structural parts.
      I think that's an application that is rarely addressed in 3D printing.

      Using fibres in resins may be a problem becasue of the dimensionality of the particles (fibres) as they are way bigger in one dimension (legth) than the resolution of the device. I am not sure how one could handle this appart from increasing the resolution beyond approximately the fibre length. This would probably be OK in your setup where tolerances are above fibre length? There is also a question of alignment of the fibres within the resin matrix.

      On another subject, as an architectural 3D printing solution, did you consider using Urea/Sporosarcina pasteurii ink-jetted on a calcium carbonate type powder bed? It cures in 24 hours yielding shell like materials. This material is used as a matrix for sand particles, which end up entrapped in a concrete like block. I have been daydreaming the possibility of building a cartesian machine with airbrush nozzles spraying this mix on calcite powder beds to print out outdoor chairs, tables, building units.... Someone had posted some info on the matter here.
      Reference material:
      http://www.springerlink.com/index/94471648675877M2.pdf
      http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/ind.2010.6.170
      http://www.springerlink.com/content/c9k1hux73504q6jr/



      On 01/06/2012 07:01 PM, cerverds wrote:
       

      I recently made a post about a new project i am going to tackle. i am new to this group so i have been reading a lot just trying to see what people are saying. i find the idea of acceptable resolution and interesting topic.y new project is going to use 4 high power DLP projector to get to a size of 36x 80. that would be 4 projectors in a line with the 1920 = 36" and 4 x 1080 = 4320 = 80". one projector is

      36"(1920) x Y20"(1080)

      which is governed by the 16:9 aspect ratio. this give me an effective resolution of 0.019" or ~1/50". for my particular application (and industry) 1/16" is more than an acceptable tolerance. What i am more concerned with is size and speed. i come from an architecture background and this project is about using additive manufacturing for architectural application (wall, facade panels, doors, ceiling systems....)

      so my challenge is speed, cost of material because we use many 1,000's of cubic inches for a facade. and lastly strength.

      i love the discussion about using metal fibers as additives. i have already been playing with glass fibers because we use a lot of GFRP in my industry. but also adding things like fire retardants to the material.

      in terms of speed i have been dealing with a custom optics manufacturer that uses TI 4100 DMD's which work at HD res and the UV 335nm wavelength and up as well as using 1,000 watt 365nm light source. hopefully that should speed up my cure times :)

      so i will keep you all posted on the progress, this seams like an active and great place for this type of discussion.


    • cerverds
      i will keep you all informed. there is an example of large concrete printing from a guy i know in italy (enrico dini) of D-Shape. he has a concrete printer
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 6, 2012
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        i will keep you all informed.

        there is an example of large concrete printing from a guy i know in italy (enrico dini) of D-Shape. he has a concrete printer with a bed of about 25 feet x 25 feet!

        http://d-shape.com/cose.htm

        -robert

        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Spacecaptain <spacecaptain@...> wrote:
        >
        > Be sure to keep us posted! I like your intention of wanting to print big
        > structural parts.
        > I think that's an application that is rarely addressed in 3D printing.
        >
        > Using fibres in resins may be a problem becasue of the dimensionality of
        > the particles (fibres) as they are way bigger in one dimension (legth)
        > than the resolution of the device. I am not sure how one could handle
        > this appart from increasing the resolution beyond approximately the
        > fibre length. This would probably be OK in your setup where tolerances
        > are above fibre length? There is also a question of alignment of the
        > fibres within the resin matrix.
        >
        > On another subject, as an architectural 3D printing solution, did you
        > consider using Urea/Sporosarcina pasteurii ink-jetted on a calcium
        > carbonate type powder bed? It cures in 24 hours yielding shell like
        > materials. This material is used as a matrix for sand particles, which
        > end up entrapped in a concrete like block. I have been daydreaming the
        > possibility of building a cartesian machine with airbrush nozzles
        > spraying this mix on calcite powder beds to print out outdoor chairs,
        > tables, building units.... Someone had posted some info on the matter here.
        > Reference material:
        > http://www.springerlink.com/index/94471648675877M2.pdf
        > http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/ind.2010.6.170
        > http://www.springerlink.com/content/c9k1hux73504q6jr/
        >
        >
        >
        > On 01/06/2012 07:01 PM, cerverds wrote:
        > >
        > > I recently made a post about a new project i am going to tackle. i am
        > > new to this group so i have been reading a lot just trying to see what
        > > people are saying. i find the idea of acceptable resolution and
        > > interesting topic.y new project is going to use 4 high power DLP
        > > projector to get to a size of 36x 80. that would be 4 projectors in a
        > > line with the 1920 = 36" and 4 x 1080 = 4320 = 80". one projector is
        > >
        > > 36"(1920) x Y20"(1080)
        > >
        > > which is governed by the 16:9 aspect ratio. this give me an effective
        > > resolution of 0.019" or ~1/50". for my particular application (and
        > > industry) 1/16" is more than an acceptable tolerance. What i am more
        > > concerned with is size and speed. i come from an architecture
        > > background and this project is about using additive manufacturing for
        > > architectural application (wall, facade panels, doors, ceiling
        > > systems....)
        > >
        > > so my challenge is speed, cost of material because we use many 1,000's
        > > of cubic inches for a facade. and lastly strength.
        > >
        > > i love the discussion about using metal fibers as additives. i have
        > > already been playing with glass fibers because we use a lot of GFRP in
        > > my industry. but also adding things like fire retardants to the material.
        > >
        > > in terms of speed i have been dealing with a custom optics
        > > manufacturer that uses TI 4100 DMD's which work at HD res and the UV
        > > 335nm wavelength and up as well as using 1,000 watt 365nm light
        > > source. hopefully that should speed up my cure times :)
        > >
        > > so i will keep you all posted on the progress, this seams like an
        > > active and great place for this type of discussion.
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Spacecaptain
        That technology is very nice! I would have bet it was the same thing as the Sporosarcina pasteurii but they mention that their binder is inorganic. But in any
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 6, 2012
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          That technology is very nice! I would have bet it was the same thing as the Sporosarcina pasteurii but they mention that their binder is inorganic. But in any other respect the technology is similar.
          I think this technology has a huge potential. Imagine the energy savings, a tiny carbon footprint compared to regular concrete: Transportation and mining costs of the the sand. Urea or lactose effluent are waste products in which the bacteria thrives and can easily be sprayed on the build bed... I'll send this to an architect friend of mine I have been discussing this with.

          But I wouldn't try to transport the machine to where the parts are going to live. Just print modular units, transport those and assemble them on site. The logistics of transport should be easier to tackle rather than the difficulties of implementation of the huge printer devivce at unknown sites, over and over again.

          On 01/06/2012 07:38 PM, cerverds wrote:
           

          i will keep you all informed.

          there is an example of large concrete printing from a guy i know in italy (enrico dini) of D-Shape. he has a concrete printer with a bed of about 25 feet x 25 feet!

          http://d-shape.com/cose.htm

          -robert

          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Spacecaptain <spacecaptain@...> wrote:
          >
          > Be sure to keep us posted! I like your intention of wanting to print big
          > structural parts.
          > I think that's an application that is rarely addressed in 3D printing.
          >
          > Using fibres in resins may be a problem becasue of the dimensionality of
          > the particles (fibres) as they are way bigger in one dimension (legth)
          > than the resolution of the device. I am not sure how one could handle
          > this appart from increasing the resolution beyond approximately the
          > fibre length. This would probably be OK in your setup where tolerances
          > are above fibre length? There is also a question of alignment of the
          > fibres within the resin matrix.
          >
          > On another subject, as an architectural 3D printing solution, did you
          > consider using Urea/Sporosarcina pasteurii ink-jetted on a calcium
          > carbonate type powder bed? It cures in 24 hours yielding shell like
          > materials. This material is used as a matrix for sand particles, which
          > end up entrapped in a concrete like block. I have been daydreaming the
          > possibility of building a cartesian machine with airbrush nozzles
          > spraying this mix on calcite powder beds to print out outdoor chairs,
          > tables, building units.... Someone had posted some info on the matter here.
          > Reference material:
          > http://www.springerlink.com/index/94471648675877M2.pdf
          > http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/ind.2010.6.170
          > http://www.springerlink.com/content/c9k1hux73504q6jr/
          >
          >
          >
          > On 01/06/2012 07:01 PM, cerverds wrote:
          > >
          > > I recently made a post about a new project i am going to tackle. i am
          > > new to this group so i have been reading a lot just trying to see what
          > > people are saying. i find the idea of acceptable resolution and
          > > interesting topic.y new project is going to use 4 high power DLP
          > > projector to get to a size of 36x 80. that would be 4 projectors in a
          > > line with the 1920 = 36" and 4 x 1080 = 4320 = 80". one projector is
          > >
          > > 36"(1920) x Y20"(1080)
          > >
          > > which is governed by the 16:9 aspect ratio. this give me an effective
          > > resolution of 0.019" or ~1/50". for my particular application (and
          > > industry) 1/16" is more than an acceptable tolerance. What i am more
          > > concerned with is size and speed. i come from an architecture
          > > background and this project is about using additive manufacturing for
          > > architectural application (wall, facade panels, doors, ceiling
          > > systems....)
          > >
          > > so my challenge is speed, cost of material because we use many 1,000's
          > > of cubic inches for a facade. and lastly strength.
          > >
          > > i love the discussion about using metal fibers as additives. i have
          > > already been playing with glass fibers because we use a lot of GFRP in
          > > my industry. but also adding things like fire retardants to the material.
          > >
          > > in terms of speed i have been dealing with a custom optics
          > > manufacturer that uses TI 4100 DMD's which work at HD res and the UV
          > > 335nm wavelength and up as well as using 1,000 watt 365nm light
          > > source. hopefully that should speed up my cure times :)
          > >
          > > so i will keep you all posted on the progress, this seams like an
          > > active and great place for this type of discussion.
          > >
          > >
          >


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