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Inkjet Cartridge Manipulation

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  • gsi11135
    Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge? I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used FPGAs to perform
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 13, 2009
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      Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?

      I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
      FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
      here has done something similar with CPLDs.

      How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
      designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
      of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
      inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.

      Joseph
      Moderator/Owner
    • Boman33
      Interesting thought! I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts: Direct control and printing of the cartridge: I would base that design on a
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 13, 2009
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        Interesting thought!

        I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:

         

        Direct control and printing of the cartridge:

        I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear movement of the cartridge.  It would be easy to test using various straight line movement of either the head or the paper under it.  The goal would be printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement of the head.

         

        3-D printing:

        There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.

        The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.  There is lots of software available both commercially and free for that task.  A further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling machine to tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed.  A little trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for tilting the cartridge up-down.

         

        Printing would be no different than milling the surface while feeding the cartridge with the proper data stream.

        Bertho

         

         

        From: gsi11135    Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26

        Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?

        I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
        FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
        here has done something similar with CPLDs.

        How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
        designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
        of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
        inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.

        Joseph
        Moderator/Owner

      • gsi11135
        Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying timing information to
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 18, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
          component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
          timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
          some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
          inkjet head.

          I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
          setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
          of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
          design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
          powder matrix as has been described here.

          There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
          lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.

          CNC capability would be an added bonus.

          Anyone have any ideas?

          Joseph
          Moderator/Owner

          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
          <boman33@...> wrote:
          >
          > Interesting thought!
          >
          > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
          >
          >
          >
          > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
          >
          > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
          movement
          > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
          > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
          > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
          of the
          > head.
          >
          >
          >
          > 3-D printing:
          >
          > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
          >
          > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
          There
          > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
          task. A
          > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
          machine to
          > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
          little
          > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
          tilting the
          > cartridge up-down.
          >
          >
          >
          > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
          feeding the
          > cartridge with the proper data stream.
          >
          > Bertho
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
          >
          >
          >
          > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
          >
          > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
          > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
          > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
          >
          > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
          > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
          > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
          > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
          >
          > Joseph
          > Moderator/Owner
          >
        • johnrpm@ymail.com
          I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects seem to take
          Message 4 of 11 , May 18 6:00 AM
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            I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing searches I came across raster image processors which I think are basically printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze over, but is this the way to go???.
            I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head system.

            anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
            http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker





            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135" <gsi11135@...> wrote:
            >
            > Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
            > component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
            > timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
            > some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
            > inkjet head.
            >
            > I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
            > setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
            > of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
            > design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
            > powder matrix as has been described here.
            >
            > There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
            > lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.
            >
            > CNC capability would be an added bonus.
            >
            > Anyone have any ideas?
            >
            > Joseph
            > Moderator/Owner
            >
            > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
            > <boman33@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Interesting thought!
            > >
            > > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
            > >
            > > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
            > movement
            > > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
            > > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
            > > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
            > of the
            > > head.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > 3-D printing:
            > >
            > > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
            > >
            > > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
            > There
            > > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
            > task. A
            > > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
            > machine to
            > > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
            > little
            > > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
            > tilting the
            > > cartridge up-down.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
            > feeding the
            > > cartridge with the proper data stream.
            > >
            > > Bertho
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
            > >
            > > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
            > > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
            > > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
            > >
            > > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
            > > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
            > > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
            > > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
            > >
            > > Joseph
            > > Moderator/Owner
            > >
            >
          • Henry Liu
            That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet Applications:
            Message 5 of 11 , May 18 9:51 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
              Applications: http://www.amazon.com/Inkjet-Applications-Matt-Gilliland/dp/0972015930/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242664514&sr=8-1

              I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
              driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
              was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.

              Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
              too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
              heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
              interface from windows is a big deal.

              I was making my own projects with some good progress using an Epson
              R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
              Feb, you can google "POSAM inkjet" and there is all the information
              you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
              latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
              epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.

              As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
              electronics/drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
              linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
              the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
              for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
              XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
              cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
              better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
              hours) of alignment work.

              I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
              collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
              I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
              wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
              lol.

              Good luck,
              Henry

              On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played
              > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
              > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
              > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are basically
              > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
              > over, but is this the way to go???.
              > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
              > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
              > system.
              >
              > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
              > http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker
              >
              > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135"
              > <gsi11135@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
              >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
              >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
              >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
              >> inkjet head.
              >>
              >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
              >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
              >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
              >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
              >> powder matrix as has been described here.
              >>
              >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
              >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.
              >>
              >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
              >>
              >> Anyone have any ideas?
              >>
              >> Joseph
              >> Moderator/Owner
              >>
              >> --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
              >> <boman33@> wrote:
              >> >
              >> > Interesting thought!
              >> >
              >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
              >> >
              >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
              >> movement
              >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
              >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
              >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
              >> of the
              >> > head.
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > 3-D printing:
              >> >
              >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
              >> >
              >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
              >> There
              >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
              >> task. A
              >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
              >> machine to
              >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
              >> little
              >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
              >> tilting the
              >> > cartridge up-down.
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
              >> feeding the
              >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
              >> >
              >> > Bertho
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
              >> >
              >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
              >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
              >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
              >> >
              >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
              >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
              >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
              >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
              >> >
              >> > Joseph
              >> > Moderator/Owner
              >> >
              >>
              >
              >
            • johnrpm@ymail.com
              Thanks for the info, sorry if this is an old topic, as a new member of the group I have been reading through posts. I fully agree with your comments, the
              Message 6 of 11 , May 18 12:43 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks for the info, sorry if this is an old topic, as a new member of the group I have been reading through posts.
                I fully agree with your comments, the reason I have reservations on printheads is the material they can deliver, if say we had a binder that gave a very strong part ( as monolite claim) and was high viscosity, the printhead may not deliver it, whereas a low velocity injector perhaps could, this would mean a low cost powder or even sand could be used, (recycled materials) also what is the life of a print head, I recently dismantled an old actua, and have the print head which feeds wax as well as lots of usefull bits from it so will look into this at some point. the borders of each slice define the part and the rest is infil (zcorp prints dense borders and lower density infill)this is why am thinking the plotter appraoch could work, although slower.

                > I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                > collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                What did you have in mind, I to have some projects to finish but am interested?.



                --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
                >
                > That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
                > Applications: http://www.amazon.com/Inkjet-Applications-Matt-Gilliland/dp/0972015930/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242664514&sr=8-1
                >
                > I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
                > driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
                > was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.
                >
                > Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
                > too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
                > heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
                > interface from windows is a big deal.
                >
                > I was making my own projects with some good progress using an Epson
                > R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
                > Feb, you can google "POSAM inkjet" and there is all the information
                > you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
                > latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
                > epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.
                >
                > As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
                > electronics/drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
                > linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
                > the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
                > for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
                > XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
                > cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
                > better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
                > hours) of alignment work.
                >
                > I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                > collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                > I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
                > wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
                > lol.
                >
                > Good luck,
                > Henry
                >
                > On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played
                > > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
                > > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
                > > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are basically
                > > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
                > > over, but is this the way to go???.
                > > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
                > > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
                > > system.
                > >
                > > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
                > > http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker
                > >
                > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135"
                > > <gsi11135@> wrote:
                > >>
                > >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
                > >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
                > >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
                > >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
                > >> inkjet head.
                > >>
                > >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
                > >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
                > >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
                > >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
                > >> powder matrix as has been described here.
                > >>
                > >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
                > >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.
                > >>
                > >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
                > >>
                > >> Anyone have any ideas?
                > >>
                > >> Joseph
                > >> Moderator/Owner
                > >>
                > >> --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
                > >> <boman33@> wrote:
                > >> >
                > >> > Interesting thought!
                > >> >
                > >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
                > >> >
                > >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
                > >> movement
                > >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
                > >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
                > >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
                > >> of the
                > >> > head.
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> > 3-D printing:
                > >> >
                > >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
                > >> >
                > >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
                > >> There
                > >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
                > >> task. A
                > >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
                > >> machine to
                > >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
                > >> little
                > >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
                > >> tilting the
                > >> > cartridge up-down.
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
                > >> feeding the
                > >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
                > >> >
                > >> > Bertho
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> >
                > >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
                > >> >
                > >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
                > >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
                > >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
                > >> >
                > >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
                > >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
                > >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
                > >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
                > >> >
                > >> > Joseph
                > >> > Moderator/Owner
                > >> >
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                >
              • Henry Liu
                The piezoelectric heads are much better for delivering a wide variety of chemicals. The POSAM project uses them to distribute DNA into microarrays. I m no
                Message 7 of 11 , May 18 2:59 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  The piezoelectric heads are much better for delivering a wide variety
                  of chemicals. The POSAM project uses them to distribute DNA into
                  microarrays.

                  I'm no chemist but high viscosity sounds messy and slow both which
                  translate to very poor resolution. You can use glue with a syringe as
                  the guys over at fab at @home do:
                  http://fabathome.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

                  As for collaboration, there are a few things I'd like to do:
                  -an electrical engineer to solder some test wires up and debug the
                  signals with a logic analyzer -> I started to do this but wiring tiny
                  things is not my favorite thing to do
                  -an EE to layout a pcb board and bill of materials -> I can make the
                  hand drawn circuit diagram but it's been a while since I used a layout
                  program (I've used Eagle, Protel, Altium Designer, Orcad) and just
                  another thing I need to do
                  -a machinist to make some parts -> I started to build a few things but
                  am waiting for parts to come in but I'm definitely more of a theorist
                  than a machinist
                  -someone to program the Windows Driver and microcontroller/fpga code
                  (I prefer C# or Labview)

                  Something short term I would like is to develop a board that controls
                  the inkjet head firing from PC DMA or USB writes.

                  If I remember correctly there's 192 nozzles x 6 colors so it would be
                  super nice to have a function DLL where you send it 192x6 array and it
                  prints out whatever you want by firing the correct nozzles. The
                  function would be: acknowledge= function FireNozzles(ImageArray[192
                  6]) and return 0 if successful or 1 if error/timeout.

                  This can easily be adapted to many uses for many parties interested in
                  inkjet liquids without having to worry about the details of
                  controlling the voltage/timing/etc.

                  Henry

                  On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 12:43 PM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks for the info, sorry if this is an old topic, as a new member of the
                  > group I have been reading through posts.
                  > I fully agree with your comments, the reason I have reservations on
                  > printheads is the material they can deliver, if say we had a binder that
                  > gave a very strong part ( as monolite claim) and was high viscosity, the
                  > printhead may not deliver it, whereas a low velocity injector perhaps could,
                  > this would mean a low cost powder or even sand could be used, (recycled
                  > materials) also what is the life of a print head, I recently dismantled an
                  > old actua, and have the print head which feeds wax as well as lots of
                  > usefull bits from it so will look into this at some point. the borders of
                  > each slice define the part and the rest is infil (zcorp prints dense borders
                  > and lower density infill)this is why am thinking the plotter appraoch could
                  > work, although slower.
                  >
                  >> I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                  >> collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                  > What did you have in mind, I to have some projects to finish but am
                  > interested?.
                  >
                  > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu
                  > <henryjliu@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
                  >> Applications:
                  >> http://www.amazon.com/Inkjet-Applications-Matt-Gilliland/dp/0972015930/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242664514&sr=8-1
                  >>
                  >> I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
                  >> driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
                  >> was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.
                  >>
                  >> Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
                  >> too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
                  >> heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
                  >> interface from windows is a big deal.
                  >>
                  >> I was making my own projects with some good progress using an Epson
                  >> R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
                  >> Feb, you can google "POSAM inkjet" and there is all the information
                  >> you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
                  >> latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
                  >> epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.
                  >>
                  >> As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
                  >> electronics/drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
                  >> linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
                  >> the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
                  >> for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
                  >> XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
                  >> cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
                  >> better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
                  >> hours) of alignment work.
                  >>
                  >> I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                  >> collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                  >> I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
                  >> wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
                  >> lol.
                  >>
                  >> Good luck,
                  >> Henry
                  >>
                  >> On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I
                  >> > played
                  >> > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
                  >> > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
                  >> > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are
                  >> > basically
                  >> > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
                  >> > over, but is this the way to go???.
                  >> > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
                  >> > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
                  >> > system.
                  >> >
                  >> > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
                  >> > http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker
                  >> >
                  >> > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135"
                  >> > <gsi11135@> wrote:
                  >> >>
                  >> >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
                  >> >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
                  >> >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
                  >> >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
                  >> >> inkjet head.
                  >> >>
                  >> >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
                  >> >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
                  >> >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
                  >> >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
                  >> >> powder matrix as has been described here.
                  >> >>
                  >> >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
                  >> >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are
                  >> >> two.
                  >> >>
                  >> >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
                  >> >>
                  >> >> Anyone have any ideas?
                  >> >>
                  >> >> Joseph
                  >> >> Moderator/Owner
                  >> >>
                  >> >> --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
                  >> >> <boman33@> wrote:
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Interesting thought!
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
                  >> >> movement
                  >> >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight
                  >> >> > line
                  >> >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
                  >> >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
                  >> >> of the
                  >> >> > head.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > 3-D printing:
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
                  >> >> There
                  >> >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
                  >> >> task. A
                  >> >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
                  >> >> machine to
                  >> >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
                  >> >> little
                  >> >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
                  >> >> tilting the
                  >> >> > cartridge up-down.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
                  >> >> feeding the
                  >> >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Bertho
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet
                  >> >> > cartridge?
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
                  >> >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group
                  >> >> > member
                  >> >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
                  >> >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all
                  >> >> > thought
                  >> >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
                  >> >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
                  >> >> >
                  >> >> > Joseph
                  >> >> > Moderator/Owner
                  >> >> >
                  >> >>
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                • johnrpm@ymail.com
                  Henry I am a toolmaker by trade so mechanical stuff is not a problem, I have a small lathe and miller so could do some parts, I use layout software for my own
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 19 12:16 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Henry
                    I am a toolmaker by trade so mechanical stuff is not a problem, I have a small lathe and miller so could do some parts, I use layout software for my own projects but am no expert and make my own boards, I also use micro controllers for my projects but again not an expert, my code skills are not up to writing drivers I'm afraid, but maybe there are some members of this group who have skills to share, time is always a problem, wife always wanting some diy done, new kitchen etc.




                    --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The piezoelectric heads are much better for delivering a wide variety
                    > of chemicals. The POSAM project uses them to distribute DNA into
                    > microarrays.
                    >
                    > I'm no chemist but high viscosity sounds messy and slow both which
                    > translate to very poor resolution. You can use glue with a syringe as
                    > the guys over at fab at @home do:
                    > http://fabathome.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page
                    >
                    > As for collaboration, there are a few things I'd like to do:
                    > -an electrical engineer to solder some test wires up and debug the
                    > signals with a logic analyzer -> I started to do this but wiring tiny
                    > things is not my favorite thing to do
                    > -an EE to layout a pcb board and bill of materials -> I can make the
                    > hand drawn circuit diagram but it's been a while since I used a layout
                    > program (I've used Eagle, Protel, Altium Designer, Orcad) and just
                    > another thing I need to do
                    > -a machinist to make some parts -> I started to build a few things but
                    > am waiting for parts to come in but I'm definitely more of a theorist
                    > than a machinist
                    > -someone to program the Windows Driver and microcontroller/fpga code
                    > (I prefer C# or Labview)
                    >
                    > Something short term I would like is to develop a board that controls
                    > the inkjet head firing from PC DMA or USB writes.
                    >
                    > If I remember correctly there's 192 nozzles x 6 colors so it would be
                    > super nice to have a function DLL where you send it 192x6 array and it
                    > prints out whatever you want by firing the correct nozzles. The
                    > function would be: acknowledge= function FireNozzles(ImageArray[192
                    > 6]) and return 0 if successful or 1 if error/timeout.
                    >
                    > This can easily be adapted to many uses for many parties interested in
                    > inkjet liquids without having to worry about the details of
                    > controlling the voltage/timing/etc.
                    >
                    > Henry
                    >
                    > On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 12:43 PM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Thanks for the info, sorry if this is an old topic, as a new member of the
                    > > group I have been reading through posts.
                    > > I fully agree with your comments, the reason I have reservations on
                    > > printheads is the material they can deliver, if say we had a binder that
                    > > gave a very strong part ( as monolite claim) and was high viscosity, the
                    > > printhead may not deliver it, whereas a low velocity injector perhaps could,
                    > > this would mean a low cost powder or even sand could be used, (recycled
                    > > materials) also what is the life of a print head, I recently dismantled an
                    > > old actua, and have the print head which feeds wax as well as lots of
                    > > usefull bits from it so will look into this at some point. the borders of
                    > > each slice define the part and the rest is infil (zcorp prints dense borders
                    > > and lower density infill)this is why am thinking the plotter appraoch could
                    > > work, although slower.
                    > >
                    > >> I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                    > >> collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                    > > What did you have in mind, I to have some projects to finish but am
                    > > interested?.
                    > >
                    > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu
                    > > <henryjliu@> wrote:
                    > >>
                    > >> That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
                    > >> Applications:
                    > >> http://www.amazon.com/Inkjet-Applications-Matt-Gilliland/dp/0972015930/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242664514&sr=8-1
                    > >>
                    > >> I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
                    > >> driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
                    > >> was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.
                    > >>
                    > >> Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
                    > >> too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
                    > >> heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
                    > >> interface from windows is a big deal.
                    > >>
                    > >> I was making my own projects with some good progress using an Epson
                    > >> R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
                    > >> Feb, you can google "POSAM inkjet" and there is all the information
                    > >> you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
                    > >> latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
                    > >> epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.
                    > >>
                    > >> As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
                    > >> electronics/drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
                    > >> linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
                    > >> the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
                    > >> for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
                    > >> XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
                    > >> cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
                    > >> better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
                    > >> hours) of alignment work.
                    > >>
                    > >> I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                    > >> collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                    > >> I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
                    > >> wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
                    > >> lol.
                    > >>
                    > >> Good luck,
                    > >> Henry
                    > >>
                    > >> On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@ <johnrpm@> wrote:
                    > >> >
                    > >> >
                    > >> > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I
                    > >> > played
                    > >> > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
                    > >> > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
                    > >> > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are
                    > >> > basically
                    > >> > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
                    > >> > over, but is this the way to go???.
                    > >> > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
                    > >> > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
                    > >> > system.
                    > >> >
                    > >> > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
                    > >> > http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker
                    > >> >
                    > >> > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135"
                    > >> > <gsi11135@> wrote:
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
                    > >> >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
                    > >> >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
                    > >> >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
                    > >> >> inkjet head.
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
                    > >> >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
                    > >> >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
                    > >> >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
                    > >> >> powder matrix as has been described here.
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
                    > >> >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are
                    > >> >> two.
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> Anyone have any ideas?
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> Joseph
                    > >> >> Moderator/Owner
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >> --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
                    > >> >> <boman33@> wrote:
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > Interesting thought!
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
                    > >> >> movement
                    > >> >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight
                    > >> >> > line
                    > >> >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
                    > >> >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
                    > >> >> of the
                    > >> >> > head.
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > 3-D printing:
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
                    > >> >> There
                    > >> >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
                    > >> >> task. A
                    > >> >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
                    > >> >> machine to
                    > >> >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
                    > >> >> little
                    > >> >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
                    > >> >> tilting the
                    > >> >> > cartridge up-down.
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
                    > >> >> feeding the
                    > >> >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > Bertho
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet
                    > >> >> > cartridge?
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
                    > >> >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group
                    > >> >> > member
                    > >> >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
                    > >> >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all
                    > >> >> > thought
                    > >> >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
                    > >> >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >> > Joseph
                    > >> >> > Moderator/Owner
                    > >> >> >
                    > >> >>
                    > >> >
                    > >> >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Warren Williams
                    hey guys found this link may be helpfull for a new  powder mix that is cheap and supposedly home made.
                    Message 9 of 11 , May 19 1:19 PM
                    • 0 Attachment

                      hey guys found this link may be helpfull for a new  powder mix that is cheap and supposedly home made.

                      http://www.ceramicartsdaily.org/magazines/Ceramics%20Monthly/2009febprintedpotfeature.aspx

                      Warren Williams
                      Lead robotics/research engineer
                      Phantasm Robotics inc.
                      314-971-4122
                       
                      *The information contained in this e-mail and any attachments is confidential information intended only for the use of individuals or entities named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by e-mail at the originating address.


                      --- On Mon, 5/18/09, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                      From: johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...>
                      Subject: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: Inkjet Cartridge Manipulation
                      To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Monday, May 18, 2009, 2:43 PM

                      Thanks for the info, sorry if this is an old topic, as a new member of the group I have been reading through posts.
                      I fully agree with your comments, the reason I have reservations on printheads is the material they can deliver, if say we had a binder that gave a very strong part ( as monolite claim) and was high viscosity, the printhead may not deliver it, whereas a low velocity injector perhaps could, this would mean a low cost powder or even sand could be used, (recycled materials) also what is the life of a print head, I recently dismantled an old actua, and have the print head which feeds wax as well as lots of usefull bits from it so will look into this at some point. the borders of each slice define the part and the rest is infil (zcorp prints dense borders and lower density infill)this is why am thinking the plotter appraoch could work, although slower.

                      > I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                      > collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                      What did you have in mind, I to have some projects to finish but am interested?.

                      --- In diy_3d_printing_ and_fabrication@ yahoogroups. com, Henry Liu <henryjliu@. ..> wrote:
                      >
                      > That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
                      > Applications: http://www.amazon. com/Inkjet- Applications- Matt-Gilliland/ dp/0972015930/ ref=sr_1_ 1?ie=UTF8& s=books&qid= 1242664514& sr=8-1
                      >
                      > I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
                      > driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
                      > was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.
                      >
                      > Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
                      > too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
                      > heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
                      > interface from windows is a big deal.
                      >
                      > I was making my own projects with some good progress using an Epson
                      > R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
                      > Feb, you can google "POSAM inkjet" and there is all the information
                      > you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
                      > latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
                      > epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.
                      >
                      > As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
                      > electronics/ drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
                      > linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
                      > the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
                      > for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
                      > XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
                      > cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
                      > better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
                      > hours) of alignment work.
                      >
                      > I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                      > collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                      > I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
                      > wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
                      > lol.
                      >
                      > Good luck,
                      > Henry
                      >
                      > On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@... > wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played
                      > > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
                      > > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
                      > > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are basically
                      > > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
                      > > over, but is this the way to go???.
                      > > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
                      > > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
                      > > system.
                      > >
                      > > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
                      > > http://spritesmods. com/?art= inker
                      > >
                      > > --- In diy_3d_printing_ and_fabrication@ yahoogroups. com, "gsi11135"
                      > > <gsi11135@> wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
                      > >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
                      > >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
                      > >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
                      > >> inkjet head.
                      > >>
                      > >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
                      > >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
                      > >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
                      > >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
                      > >> powder matrix as has been described here.
                      > >>
                      > >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
                      > >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.
                      > >>
                      > >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
                      > >>
                      > >> Anyone have any ideas?
                      > >>
                      > >> Joseph
                      > >> Moderator/Owner
                      > >>
                      > >> --- In diy_3d_printing_ and_fabrication@ yahoogroups. com, "Boman33"
                      > >> <boman33@> wrote:
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Interesting thought!
                      > >> >
                      > >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
                      > >> >
                      > >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
                      > >> movement
                      > >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
                      > >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
                      > >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
                      > >> of the
                      > >> > head.
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> > 3-D printing:
                      > >> >
                      > >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
                      > >> >
                      > >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
                      > >> There
                      > >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
                      > >> task. A
                      > >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
                      > >> machine to
                      > >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
                      > >> little
                      > >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
                      > >> tilting the
                      > >> > cartridge up-down.
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
                      > >> feeding the
                      > >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Bertho
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
                      > >> >
                      > >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
                      > >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
                      > >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
                      > >> >
                      > >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
                      > >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
                      > >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
                      > >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Joseph
                      > >> > Moderator/Owner
                      > >> >
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      >


                    • gsi11135
                      To All: Post Links in messages and Links section. Thank you. Joseph Owner/Moderator
                      Message 10 of 11 , May 22 8:04 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        To All:

                        Post Links in messages and Links section.

                        Thank you.

                        Joseph
                        Owner/Moderator

                        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
                        > Applications: http://www.amazon.com/Inkjet-Applications-Matt-Gilliland/dp/0972015930/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242664514&sr=8-1
                        >
                        > I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
                        > driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
                        > was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.
                        >
                        > Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
                        > too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
                        > heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
                        > interface from windows is a big deal.
                        >
                        > I was making my own projects with some good progress using an Epson
                        > R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
                        > Feb, you can google "POSAM inkjet" and there is all the information
                        > you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
                        > latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
                        > epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.
                        >
                        > As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
                        > electronics/drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
                        > linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
                        > the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
                        > for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
                        > XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
                        > cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
                        > better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
                        > hours) of alignment work.
                        >
                        > I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                        > collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                        > I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
                        > wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
                        > lol.
                        >
                        > Good luck,
                        > Henry
                        >
                        > On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played
                        > > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
                        > > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
                        > > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are basically
                        > > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
                        > > over, but is this the way to go???.
                        > > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
                        > > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
                        > > system.
                        > >
                        > > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
                        > > http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker
                        > >
                        > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135"
                        > > <gsi11135@> wrote:
                        > >>
                        > >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
                        > >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
                        > >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
                        > >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
                        > >> inkjet head.
                        > >>
                        > >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
                        > >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
                        > >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
                        > >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
                        > >> powder matrix as has been described here.
                        > >>
                        > >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
                        > >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.
                        > >>
                        > >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
                        > >>
                        > >> Anyone have any ideas?
                        > >>
                        > >> Joseph
                        > >> Moderator/Owner
                        > >>
                        > >> --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
                        > >> <boman33@> wrote:
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Interesting thought!
                        > >> >
                        > >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
                        > >> >
                        > >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
                        > >> movement
                        > >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
                        > >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
                        > >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
                        > >> of the
                        > >> > head.
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> > 3-D printing:
                        > >> >
                        > >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
                        > >> There
                        > >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
                        > >> task. A
                        > >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
                        > >> machine to
                        > >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
                        > >> little
                        > >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
                        > >> tilting the
                        > >> > cartridge up-down.
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
                        > >> feeding the
                        > >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Bertho
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
                        > >> >
                        > >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
                        > >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
                        > >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
                        > >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
                        > >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
                        > >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
                        > >> >
                        > >> > Joseph
                        > >> > Moderator/Owner
                        > >> >
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • cheahmeng6692
                        Hi, I m planning to direct control the printer cartridge for 3d printing as well...however, if I plan to use the HP 51604a cartridge as what is taught in the
                        Message 11 of 11 , Sep 15, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi,

                          I'm planning to direct control the printer cartridge for 3d printing as well...however, if I plan to use the HP 51604a cartridge as what is taught in the book, Then I doubting the lifespan of the cartridge itself and the availability of the cartridge. As you all know, the printer compatible to the cartridge is somehow 20 years old...I worry that I cannot buy new cartridge after few more years.

                          Even though the ink inside the cartridge can be refill, but how about the lifespan of the resistors and heating plate of the cartridge? I tried to direct control HP 21 cartridge but it doesn't went well... is anyone here know how is the description of the pinouts???

                          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > That information seems to be completely absorbed into the book Inkjet
                          > Applications: http://www.amazon.com/Inkjet-Applications-Matt-Gilliland/dp/0972015930/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1242664514&sr=8-1
                          >
                          > I bought this book and it tells you everything you want to know about
                          > driving an HP inkjet head. Parallax made a serial inkjet printer that
                          > was easy to use but finding the cartridge holder now is difficult.
                          >
                          > Gcode isn't going to work very well for inkjet printing. There's way
                          > too much information. Writing the firmware to control the inkjet
                          > heads isn't a problem and relatively simple but writing the drivers to
                          > interface from windows is a big deal.
                          >
                          > I was making my own projects witPOSAM inkjeth some good progress using an Epson
                          > R280 printer. To answer the OP's question which I see is back from
                          > Feb, you can google "" and there is all the information
                          > you need to drive the Epson heads. You just clock the data in serial,
                          > latch it and it fires. In my previous posts, I explained why only the
                          > epson piezoelectric print heads are worth hacking.
                          >
                          > As for making the xyz, it's way easier/cheaper to recycle the
                          > electronics/drives from the printer or other sources. Building a fast
                          > linear slide isn't easy because the acceleration is quite high when
                          > the head is at rest. 1200dpi is less than .0001" which is out of spec
                          > for most CNC machines. I already have a 6 axis robotic arm and a .1um
                          > XYZ so no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I made my own sherline
                          > cnc mill and lathe with mach3 and it definitely isn't easy getting
                          > better than .001" accuracy without a linear encoder and a lot (many
                          > hours) of alignment work.
                          >
                          > I've been busy with a bunch of projects but would be happy to
                          > collaborate with someone that is actually capable of doing some work.
                          > I tried soliciting interest before but got no takers. I'm going to
                          > wait until fall semester then assign a grad student or something to it
                          > lol.
                          >
                          > Good luck,
                          > Henry
                          >
                          > On Mon, May 18, 2009 at 6:00 AM, johnrpm@... <johnrpm@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I joined this group recently because this subject fascinates me, I played
                          > > around a couple of years ago with making a 3d printer but other projects
                          > > seem to take over, but you guys have rekindled the flame, when doing
                          > > searches I came across raster image processors which I think are basically
                          > > printer drivers, the thought of trying to write one makes my eyes glaze
                          > > over, but is this the way to go???.
                          > > I have been leaning towards using reprap skeinforge to produce Gcode and
                          > > mach3 to drive a plotter based system but can not let go of a print head
                          > > system.
                          > >
                          > > anyway here is a link to some print head hacks
                          > > http://spritesmods.com/?art=inker
                          > >
                          > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gsi11135"
                          > > <gsi11135@> wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >> Direct control of the inkjet head is, in my estimation, a key
                          > >> component in obtaining good results. What is the process in applying
                          > >> timing information to digital logic? IIRC, there is someone who did
                          > >> some reverse engineering of the printer electronics and not just the
                          > >> inkjet head.
                          > >>
                          > >> I can think of some inherent disadvantages to the parallel kinematic
                          > >> setup yet I do not think that they are deal breakers. One off the top
                          > >> of my head: limited space for a model and other equipment making the
                          > >> design more complex for refilling the bins...provided you use the same
                          > >> powder matrix as has been described here.
                          > >>
                          > >> There are some advantages too. Fast movement and errors in the arm
                          > >> lengths can be compensated for down to the 100s of microns level are two.
                          > >>
                          > >> CNC capability would be an added bonus.
                          > >>
                          > >> Anyone have any ideas?
                          > >>
                          > >> Joseph
                          > >> Moderator/Owner
                          > >>
                          > >> --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33"
                          > >> <boman33@> wrote:
                          > >> >
                          > >> > Interesting thought!
                          > >> >
                          > >> > I suggest though splitting the project cleanly into two parts:
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> > Direct control and printing of the cartridge:
                          > >> >
                          > >> > I would base that design on a simple Constant speed straight linear
                          > >> movement
                          > >> > of the cartridge. It would be easy to test using various straight line
                          > >> > movement of either the head or the paper under it. The goal would be
                          > >> > printing clean text and pictures assuming a constant speed movement
                          > >> of the
                          > >> > head.
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> > 3-D printing:
                          > >> >
                          > >> > There are many designs for 3-D milling that could be applied.
                          > >> >
                          > >> > The starting point could be to use an existing CNC milling machine.
                          > >> There
                          > >> > is lots of software available both commercially and free for that
                          > >> task. A
                          > >> > further improvement would be to add a fourth axis to the milling
                          > >> machine to
                          > >> > tilt the cartridge left-right to match the surface being printed. A
                          > >> little
                          > >> > trickier but the free software exists it to add a 5th axis for
                          > >> tilting the
                          > >> > cartridge up-down.
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> > Printing would be no different than milling the surface while
                          > >> feeding the
                          > >> > cartridge with the proper data stream.
                          > >> >
                          > >> > Bertho
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> > From: gsi11135 Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2009 01:26
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> >
                          > >> > Has anyone delved into the fine art of controlling the inkjet cartridge?
                          > >> >
                          > >> > I know on the PCB inkjet yahoo group at least one individual has used
                          > >> > FPGAs to perform the timing of the inkjet firing. Another group member
                          > >> > here has done something similar with CPLDs.
                          > >> >
                          > >> > How would you design a 3 axis control system? Are there any other
                          > >> > designs? What sorts of mechanical design elements have you all thought
                          > >> > of? I was thinking of developing a parallel kinematic robot with an
                          > >> > inkjet head for printing out 3D objects.
                          > >> >
                          > >> > Joseph
                          > >> > Moderator/Owner
                          > >> >
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
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