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Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: Sartomer Resin checks

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  • Fernando
    Here is a nice writeup on health issues related to some diacrylates for dental work use
    Message 1 of 22 , Oct 1 2:05 AM
      Here is a nice writeup on health issues related to some diacrylates for
      dental work use

      http://copublications.greenfacts.org/en/dental-amalgam/l-3/5-health-effects-alternative-materials.htm

      In a nutshell, the polymerized resin is of no known concern and the
      relative danger lies with the uncured resin that may remain in your
      object. A secondary curing stage for completing the curing is thus an
      sensible step to make.

      There are references to toxicological studies in the link above. The
      interesting part starts at paragraph 3.4.3

      Cheers!


      On Mon, 2011-09-26 at 11:07 -0500, Jon Elson wrote:
      >
      > Spacecaptain wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > It would appear that way. Nevertheless, Ethoxylated(6) Bisphenol-A
      > > Triacrylate is probably on the more expensive side, being a
      > > trifunctional acrylate.
      > > Ethoxylated(10) Bisphenol-A Diacrylate looks very good also, and
      > > there is a nice progression with the increase of oligomer units
      > > (from 3, 4 to 10) which confirms the good choice of this compound.
      > I'm not a chemist, but is Bisphenol-A already banned in the EU? I
      > seem to recall a lot of
      > info on this substance being banned due to bioaccumulation and
      > probable interference
      > with hormone systems.
      > >
      > > On the shrinkage, some seem to be doing better than others, but it
      > > is difficult to give a final answer to this issue as the measuring
      > > method has yet to be sistematized. I am thinking on measuring the
      > > reduction in volume of a 1ml (or larger) sample after curing, but
      > > that is a difficult thing to achieve with good precision. I may have
      > > to rely on shape observations, which are more subjective than
      > > anything else. I'll keep you posted if I come up with a sistematic
      > > and reliable way of measuring this.
      > This may be a lot easier to measure if you get a 3-D printer running.
      >
      > Jon
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Fernando
      Here a more chemistry oriented article on BPA http://www.adhesivesmag.com/Articles/Green_Formulation/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000517341 This addresses
      Message 2 of 22 , Oct 1 2:25 AM
        Here a more chemistry oriented article on BPA

        http://www.adhesivesmag.com/Articles/Green_Formulation/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000517341

        This addresses the residual content of BPA in the type of resins we use.
        They offer solutions and recommendations for people in want of very low
        BPA content in their products.

        Some of the resins I am testing are within the recommended list of very
        low BPA residue.

        On Mon, 2011-09-26 at 11:07 -0500, Jon Elson wrote:
        >
        > Spacecaptain wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > It would appear that way. Nevertheless, Ethoxylated(6) Bisphenol-A
        > > Triacrylate is probably on the more expensive side, being a
        > > trifunctional acrylate.
        > > Ethoxylated(10) Bisphenol-A Diacrylate looks very good also, and
        > > there is a nice progression with the increase of oligomer units
        > > (from 3, 4 to 10) which confirms the good choice of this compound.
        > I'm not a chemist, but is Bisphenol-A already banned in the EU? I
        > seem to recall a lot of
        > info on this substance being banned due to bioaccumulation and
        > probable interference
        > with hormone systems.
        > >
        > > On the shrinkage, some seem to be doing better than others, but it
        > > is difficult to give a final answer to this issue as the measuring
        > > method has yet to be sistematized. I am thinking on measuring the
        > > reduction in volume of a 1ml (or larger) sample after curing, but
        > > that is a difficult thing to achieve with good precision. I may have
        > > to rely on shape observations, which are more subjective than
        > > anything else. I'll keep you posted if I come up with a sistematic
        > > and reliable way of measuring this.
        > This may be a lot easier to measure if you get a 3-D printer running.
        >
        > Jon
        >
        >
        >
        >
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