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Re: Time for a manicure / pedicure?

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  • pzamov
    Oh, and of course another industry that uses similar resins and UV: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coWvn676Bqs concrete floor sealants.
    Message 1 of 34 , Jun 1, 2011
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      Oh, and of course another industry that uses similar resins and UV:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coWvn676Bqs

      concrete floor sealants.



      --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "pzamov" <pzamov@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi all,
      > looking at my wives cabinet with gel coat nail polish led me to look for an alternative:
      >
      > http://polymerclayproductions.com/shop-here/magicglos-uv-resin/
      >
      > I knew that the industry uses UV to cure the nail bond and polish and looked a little further:
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgqiYTJK8w4
      >
      > Not a bad result and a price for testing after all:
      > 1oz = $10
      > and that is retail.
      > I'm sure we can find alternatives that a cheaper that the nail polish, but at least I'll push the idea of thinking in that line of thought.
      >
      > I'm just imagining this - all over the world there will be a wave of men going to salon and asking for manicure/pedicure just to see it work!LOL
      >
      > I will be making the post print UV cure station from the UV lights used for terrariums and nail polish dryers.
      >
    • Fernando
      Actually, I m investigating on a 2 stage cure solution for our resins. For now, I do not have a confirmation from my provider, but I will keep the list and
      Message 34 of 34 , Jun 6, 2011
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        Actually, I'm investigating on a 2 stage cure solution for our resins.
        For now, I do not have a confirmation from my provider, but I will keep
        the list and wiki up to date with whatever new formulations I will be
        proposed (hopefully within a matter of days).
        I may not get a detailed list of the components of the resins, but it
        would probably be a true and tested commercial resin.
        Let's just hope the price tag is right too...

        On Mon, 2011-06-06 at 20:13 +0000, pzamov wrote:
        >
        > This is not to say which technology is better, it is only throwing
        > some ideas in the air to brainstorm if it is feasible and viable to
        > consider the direction and continue to work in that line of thought.
        >
        > Since I'm cutting wax on a CNC at 0.02 increments, I can move the Z
        > and have something analogous with
        > http://www.dwssystems.com/cms/file/downloads/schede/dw029_job_examples.pdf
        >
        > The build envelope is 110x110. I would be getting away from the
        > galvanometer distortion toward the edge of the platform.
        > Even If I slow it down considerably it is still better than the 029.
        >
        > @Jon Elson - Thanks for confirming my general calculation. I would
        > assume that a resin can be formulated to cure in the minuscule time
        > that the laser unit is scanning at, even if it is not UV Laser.
        > The above DigitalWax system goes through a post-cure process and the
        > models need to be only strong enough to be transferred with the build
        > platform to the UV Cure unit.
        >
        > We need to think at the same process for the other technologies we are
        > discussing (DLP).
        >
        > A lot of people assume a completely cured model is removed once the
        > printer is done and want a vat that is going to be used forever. Truth
        > of the matter is that if the companies that have the money and R&D
        > departments can't solve this, we as a DIY might not as well ( or maybe
        > we can ). We can only work around the limitations of the current
        > technology and try to do it in an affordable manner.
        >
        > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson
        > <elson@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > José Luis Rey wrote:
        > > > How many time will spent the laser to cure a single spot??
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > DLP do this in parallel,
        > > >
        > > Yes, this is the killer. You can figure it out. This was a 14 PPM
        > > printer with 1200 x 1200 DPI.
        > > So, a page is about 270 mm tall, with about 13000 raster lines. 60
        > > seconds/14 = 4.25 seconds/page,
        > > or about 325 us/raster line. The printing area is about 7.5" (190
        > mm)
        > > wide, so the beam sweeps
        > > 190 mm in 325 us, or 1.7 us/mm. A pixel is 21 um, so about 36
        > > ns/pixel. But, that really is not the question.
        > >
        > > The real question is total power delivered per unit area. And, yes,
        > > that's why the DLP with huge
        > > light source beats the laser. A really insane laser is several
        > hundred
        > > mW of actual light output.
        > > The typical DLP lamp produces WATTS of short-wavelength light. So,
        > the
        > > total output at the wavelength
        > > that will cure the resin is likely to be at least ten times the
        > output
        > > of even the most insane laser.
        > > The typical lasers in printers are in the 5 mW class. If you were
        > to
        > > swap out the laser for a visible,
        > > high-power laser, then you would have to re-do the laser drive
        > circuits
        > > as well as provide cooling.
        > > Lasers are notoriously inefficient, and as the wavelength gets
        > shorter,
        > > they get much less efficient.
        > > So, a 500 mW visible laser will certainly need at least 10 W of
        > drive
        > > power. (My deep-red
        > > 5 mW laser in my photoplotter draws about 50 mA at 2 V, so that 0.1
        > W,
        > > for an efficiency of
        > > 5%. )
        > >
        > > Jon
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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