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Re: fep / teflon coated glass

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  • vrsculptor@hotmail.com
    Hi Adam, I obtained the teflon coated borosilicate glass for Junior. It turned out to be unusable, the coating was not transparent enough. I was not able to
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 17, 2010
      Hi Adam,
      I obtained the teflon coated borosilicate glass for Junior. It turned out to be unusable, the coating was not transparent enough. I was not able to find a source for precoated teflon glass and had to go to a manufacturer who did coatings for industrial and medical firms. This took a lot of calls and time to set up.

      I haven't heard from Junior in weeks but last I heard he found a source for clear teflon film but was having problems bonding it to the glass. He was getting bubbles between the film and glass.

      We know from the Chinese white papers that they had success with using silicone coated glass. There are discussions elsewhere on this board.

      Another option might be to find a resin that didn't stick to glass.

      It sure would be great if someone could get a look at one of the commercial machines to see how they did it.

      Roger

      -- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "wildfactory1000" <wildfactory@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi List,
      >
      > Can anyone advise on where they are purchasing fep (teflon) coated glass? ( was it quartz instead of glass for the dlp machine?)
      >
      > Thanks!
      > Adam
      >
    • Jon Elson
      ... I have a laminated label-making process that uses a trick to avoid this. It may not work there, but is at least worth considering. They have a
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 18, 2010
        vrsculptor@... wrote:
        > Hi Adam,
        > I obtained the teflon coated borosilicate glass for Junior. It turned out to be unusable, the coating was not transparent enough. I was not able to find a source for precoated teflon glass and had to go to a manufacturer who did coatings for industrial and medical firms. This took a lot of calls and time to set up.
        >
        > I haven't heard from Junior in weeks but last I heard he found a source for clear teflon film but was having problems bonding it to the glass. He was getting bubbles between the film and glass.
        >
        I have a laminated label-making process that uses a trick to avoid
        this. It may not work there, but is at least worth considering.
        They have a pressure-sensitive adhesive coated film that you adhere the
        printed image film to. You don't want bubbles there.
        So, you mist both sides with something that appears to be dilute
        detergent solution in water. One of the films is water-permeable.
        When you place the two films together, the water-detergent layer keeps
        them from sticking while you align them and then I use
        a rubber roller to squeeze the water out. No bubbles! The remaining
        trace of water passes through the film shortly and the two
        films bond tightly.

        Jon
      • Boman33
        Hi Jon, Can you please provide a reference or link to info on the labels? TIA Bertho ================================ From: Jon Elson Sent: Saturday,
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 18, 2010
          Hi Jon,
          Can you please provide a reference or link to info on the labels?
          TIA
          Bertho
          ================================
          From: Jon Elson Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2010 16:54
          I have a laminated label-making process that uses a trick to avoid
          this. It may not work there, but is at least worth considering.
          They have a pressure-sensitive adhesive coated film that you adhere the
          printed image film to. You don't want bubbles there.
          So, you mist both sides with something that appears to be dilute
          detergent solution in water. One of the films is water-permeable.
          When you place the two films together, the water-detergent layer keeps
          them from sticking while you align them and then I use
          a rubber roller to squeeze the water out. No bubbles! The remaining
          trace of water passes through the film shortly and the two
          films bond tightly.
          Jon
        • Jon Elson
          ... Well, this is way off-topic, but the US reseller is Vital Presentation Concepts, and the material is Quick-Mark. I think it is made in the UK. You expose
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 18, 2010
            Boman33 wrote:
            > Hi Jon,
            > Can you please provide a reference or link to info on the labels?
            >
            Well, this is way off-topic, but the US reseller is Vital Presentation
            Concepts, and
            the material is Quick-Mark. I think it is made in the UK. You expose
            the imaging film
            with a photomask and UV light. It is related to dry film circuit board
            resist on a carrier
            film. After exposure, you peel the film, and the exposed area transfers
            from one side
            to the other, leaving the desired pattern. You then laminate this to a
            base film of
            desired color with the image between the two sheets, making a VERY
            durable panel
            label. It is fairly expensive stuff, but now that I have to process
            working, it is pretty
            good for my purposes.

            Here's their link:
            http://www.vpcinc.com/

            Jon
          • tiwanacote
            The machine that Junior had made is the same that Envisiontec sells. It uses DLP technology from texas instruments (Like every Pojector). May be, its posible
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 19, 2010
              The machine that Junior had made is the same that Envisiontec sells. It uses DLP technology from texas instruments (Like every Pojector). May be, its posible to look for the coated material in their patents.
              Here is one link:

              http://www.google.com.ar/patents/about?id=4k93AAAAEBAJ&dq=envisiontec

              Maximiliano





              --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@...> wrote:
              >
              > Boman33 wrote:
              > > Hi Jon,
              > > Can you please provide a reference or link to info on the labels?
              > >
              > Well, this is way off-topic, but the US reseller is Vital Presentation
              > Concepts, and
              > the material is Quick-Mark. I think it is made in the UK. You expose
              > the imaging film
              > with a photomask and UV light. It is related to dry film circuit board
              > resist on a carrier
              > film. After exposure, you peel the film, and the exposed area transfers
              > from one side
              > to the other, leaving the desired pattern. You then laminate this to a
              > base film of
              > desired color with the image between the two sheets, making a VERY
              > durable panel
              > label. It is fairly expensive stuff, but now that I have to process
              > working, it is pretty
              > good for my purposes.
              >
              > Here's their link:
              > http://www.vpcinc.com/
              >
              > Jon
              >
            • Michael Couch
              Wow, some great links in this digest. I m saving this puppy. Michael Couch
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 20, 2010
                Wow, some great links in this digest. I'm saving this puppy.

                Michael Couch

                --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "tiwanacote" <tiwanacote@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > The machine that Junior had made is the same that Envisiontec sells. It uses DLP technology from texas instruments (Like every Pojector). May be, its posible to look for the coated material in their patents.
                > Here is one link:
                >
                > http://www.google.com.ar/patents/about?id=4k93AAAAEBAJ&dq=envisiontec
                >
                > Maximiliano
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Boman33 wrote:
                > > > Hi Jon,
                > > > Can you please provide a reference or link to info on the labels?
                > > >
                > > Well, this is way off-topic, but the US reseller is Vital Presentation
                > > Concepts, and
                > > the material is Quick-Mark. I think it is made in the UK. You expose
                > > the imaging film
                > > with a photomask and UV light. It is related to dry film circuit board
                > > resist on a carrier
                > > film. After exposure, you peel the film, and the exposed area transfers
                > > from one side
                > > to the other, leaving the desired pattern. You then laminate this to a
                > > base film of
                > > desired color with the image between the two sheets, making a VERY
                > > durable panel
                > > label. It is fairly expensive stuff, but now that I have to process
                > > working, it is pretty
                > > good for my purposes.
                > >
                > > Here's their link:
                > > http://www.vpcinc.com/
                > >
                > > Jon
                > >
                >
              • gotme2names
                Sorry to drag this post out so deeply from the past. I have been trying to catch up by reading all of Juniors posts related this his DLP printer. IS this were
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 3, 2011
                  Sorry to drag this post out so deeply from the past. I have been trying to catch up by reading all of Juniors posts related this his DLP printer.


                  IS this were this Teflon idea ended? Does Jr still have to slide the the build area plate to free the resin from the build tray.


                  I want to know if he solved this issue or not.

                  If not I can start hunting down some optically clear silicones. Nothing sticks to cured silicone except silicone. Perfecto fish tank silicone will bond to glass but after it's cured nothing will stick to this silicone. Maybe a microthin coat would work.


                  To prevent bubbles. You would cure the silicone ontop of the glass in a pressure pot.

                  --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, vrsculptor@... wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Adam,
                  > I obtained the teflon coated borosilicate glass for Junior. It turned out to be unusable, the coating was not transparent enough. I was not able to find a source for precoated teflon glass and had to go to a manufacturer who did coatings for industrial and medical firms. This took a lot of calls and time to set up.
                  >
                  > I haven't heard from Junior in weeks but last I heard he found a source for clear teflon film but was having problems bonding it to the glass. He was getting bubbles between the film and glass.
                  >
                  > We know from the Chinese white papers that they had success with using silicone coated glass. There are discussions elsewhere on this board.
                  >
                  > Another option might be to find a resin that didn't stick to glass.
                  >
                  > It sure would be great if someone could get a look at one of the commercial machines to see how they did it.
                  >
                  > Roger
                  >
                  > -- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "wildfactory1000" <wildfactory@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi List,
                  > >
                  > > Can anyone advise on where they are purchasing fep (teflon) coated glass? ( was it quartz instead of glass for the dlp machine?)
                  > >
                  > > Thanks!
                  > > Adam
                  > >
                  >
                • gotme2names
                  http://oi53.tinypic.com/bxysi.jpg This stuff is sold by Silicone Inc. It s called P-125 I just got off the phone with a tech who works there. She pretty sure
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011
                    http://oi53.tinypic.com/bxysi.jpg

                    This stuff is sold by Silicone Inc. It's called "P-125"

                    I just got off the phone with a tech who works there.

                    She pretty sure that it will adhere and bond to glass when it cures.

                    My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is amazing. If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.

                    Check it it out. They sell an even better near optical clear silicone called XP-565. They are sending me a cured sample and a wet sample to test out.

                    Junior if you have not found a solve the for the resin sticking to the plate. This might be it.

                    But you need a pressure pot to get a real return result. That's the only way to cure bubble free castings. You could run a small amount onto the surface of the glass. Place it in a pressure pot and cure it. It will be clearer than the air cure sample it should bond with the glass. It doesn't have to be very thick either my sample piece is 10mm thick.

                    Just trying to help. I want one of these machines so bad.




                    --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gotme2names" <gotme2names@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Sorry to drag this post out so deeply from the past. I have been trying to catch up by reading all of Juniors posts related this his DLP printer.
                    >
                    >
                    > IS this were this Teflon idea ended? Does Jr still have to slide the the build area plate to free the resin from the build tray.
                    >
                    >
                    > I want to know if he solved this issue or not.
                    >
                    > If not I can start hunting down some optically clear silicones. Nothing sticks to cured silicone except silicone. Perfecto fish tank silicone will bond to glass but after it's cured nothing will stick to this silicone. Maybe a microthin coat would work.
                    >
                    >
                    > To prevent bubbles. You would cure the silicone ontop of the glass in a pressure pot.
                    >
                    > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, vrsculptor@ wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Adam,
                    > > I obtained the teflon coated borosilicate glass for Junior. It turned out to be unusable, the coating was not transparent enough. I was not able to find a source for precoated teflon glass and had to go to a manufacturer who did coatings for industrial and medical firms. This took a lot of calls and time to set up.
                    > >
                    > > I haven't heard from Junior in weeks but last I heard he found a source for clear teflon film but was having problems bonding it to the glass. He was getting bubbles between the film and glass.
                    > >
                    > > We know from the Chinese white papers that they had success with using silicone coated glass. There are discussions elsewhere on this board.
                    > >
                    > > Another option might be to find a resin that didn't stick to glass.
                    > >
                    > > It sure would be great if someone could get a look at one of the commercial machines to see how they did it.
                    > >
                    > > Roger
                    > >
                    > > -- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "wildfactory1000" <wildfactory@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Hi List,
                    > > >
                    > > > Can anyone advise on where they are purchasing fep (teflon) coated glass? ( was it quartz instead of glass for the dlp machine?)
                    > > >
                    > > > Thanks!
                    > > > Adam
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Boman33
                    Normally casting or potting material is placed in a vacuum chamber after mixing or after pouring if it was sloppily done or there is entrapped air. This will
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011

                      Normally casting or potting material is placed in a vacuum chamber after mixing or after pouring if it was sloppily done or there is entrapped air.  This will release any trapped air and afterwards air pressure will force it into small crevices.

                       

                      For potting critical electronic assemblies they are also placed in the vacuum chamber together with the potting material and a vacuum is pulled.  After suitable outgassing time, they are lowered into the liquid while still under vacuum.  Once air pressure is returned it will force the potting liquid deep inside the parts.  (I used to set up factories for potting high voltage transformers)

                      Bertho

                      +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                      From: gotme2names  Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 11:57.

                      My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is amazing. If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.

                    • gotme2names
                      https://www.smooth-on.com/index.php?cPath=1273
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011
                        https://www.smooth-on.com/index.php?cPath=1273

                        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33" <boman33@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Normally casting or potting material is placed in a vacuum chamber after
                        > mixing or after pouring if it was sloppily done or there is entrapped air.
                        > This will release any trapped air and afterwards air pressure will force it
                        > into small crevices.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > For potting critical electronic assemblies they are also placed in the
                        > vacuum chamber together with the potting material and a vacuum is pulled.
                        > After suitable outgassing time, they are lowered into the liquid while still
                        > under vacuum. Once air pressure is returned it will force the potting
                        > liquid deep inside the parts. (I used to set up factories for potting high
                        > voltage transformers)
                        >
                        > Bertho
                        >
                        > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                        >
                        > From: gotme2names Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 11:57.
                        >
                        > My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is
                        > the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is amazing.
                        > If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.
                        >
                      • gotme2names
                        The www.smooth-on.com Tech said a Pressure Pot is better than Vacuum Chamber for creating bubble free silicone casts.
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011
                          The www.smooth-on.com Tech said a Pressure Pot is better than Vacuum Chamber for creating bubble free silicone casts.




                          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33" <boman33@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Normally casting or potting material is placed in a vacuum chamber after
                          > mixing or after pouring if it was sloppily done or there is entrapped air.
                          > This will release any trapped air and afterwards air pressure will force it
                          > into small crevices.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > For potting critical electronic assemblies they are also placed in the
                          > vacuum chamber together with the potting material and a vacuum is pulled.
                          > After suitable outgassing time, they are lowered into the liquid while still
                          > under vacuum. Once air pressure is returned it will force the potting
                          > liquid deep inside the parts. (I used to set up factories for potting high
                          > voltage transformers)
                          >
                          > Bertho
                          >
                          > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                          >
                          > From: gotme2names Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 11:57.
                          >
                          > My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is
                          > the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is amazing.
                          > If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.
                          >
                        • Boman33
                          Not so fast! If air is entrapped when pouring of the potting liquid, pressurizing it will of course shrink the entrapped air but only in proportion to the
                          Message 12 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011

                            Not so fast!

                            If air is entrapped when pouring of the potting liquid, pressurizing it will of course shrink the entrapped air but only in proportion to the applied pressure.   Very small volumes of air can be absorbed into the liquid.  No magic. 

                             

                            By first pulling a vacuum and then pouring the liquid there is no air to be trapped and it completely fills the voids, only limited by the viscosity of the liquid.  There are good reasons why critical components are specific to be vacuum impregnated.

                            I am not selling anything.  The website referenced is …………….

                            Bertho

                             

                            From: gotme2names   Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 15:28

                            The www.smooth-on.com Tech said a Pressure Pot is better than Vacuum Chamber for creating bubble free silicone casts.

                            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33" <boman33@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Normally casting or potting material is placed in a vacuum chamber after
                            > mixing or after pouring if it was sloppily done or there is entrapped air.
                            > This will release any trapped air and afterwards air pressure will force it
                            > into small crevices.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > For potting critical electronic assemblies they are also placed in the
                            > vacuum chamber together with the potting material and a vacuum is pulled.
                            > After suitable outgassing time, they are lowered into the liquid while still
                            > under vacuum. Once air pressure is returned it will force the potting
                            > liquid deep inside the parts. (I used to set up factories for potting high
                            > voltage transformers)
                            >
                            > Bertho
                            >
                            > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                            >
                            > From: gotme2names Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 11:57.
                            >
                            > My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is
                            > the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is amazing.
                            > If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.

                          • gotme2names
                            Ok then if we have to be anal about this. You take the silicone after you mix it A and B together- You put it in a cup 4 to 5 times the volume of the silicone
                            Message 13 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011
                              Ok then if we have to be anal about this. You take the silicone after you mix it A and B together- You put it in a cup 4 to 5 times the volume of the silicone placed into it. The silicone will expand in the vacuum chamber. Put it in a vacumm chamber degass it... Then you pour it in as a thin stream over the glass until you have the thickness you desire, and then you put it in a pressure pot to insure it will remain bubble free.

                              You have to leave the silicone in the pressure pot until it is completely cured.

                              The second you take the silicone out of a vacumm chamber air can return into it. youtube latex glove in vacumm chamber video to see what I mean.

                              Over at www.therpf.com

                              People there usually use pressure pots for clear resins and silicones.

                              Smooth-On doesn't sell pressure pots. I was just looking for a quick blurb of text, and a site to back it up.

                              Here>>>>>>>>>>>>
                              http://www.conceptart.org/forums/archive/index.php/t-101749.html
                              this message

                              Please Read the entire thread.

                              -------------------------------------------------

                              --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Boman33" <boman33@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Not so fast!
                              >
                              > If air is entrapped when pouring of the potting liquid, pressurizing it will
                              > of course shrink the entrapped air but only in proportion to the applied
                              > pressure. Very small volumes of air can be absorbed into the liquid. No
                              > magic.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > By first pulling a vacuum and then pouring the liquid there is no air to be
                              > trapped and it completely fills the voids, only limited by the viscosity of
                              > the liquid. There are good reasons why critical components are specific to
                              > be vacuum impregnated.
                              >
                              > I am not selling anything. The website referenced is ......
                              >
                              > Bertho
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > From: gotme2names Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 15:28
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > The www.smooth-on.com Tech said a Pressure Pot is better than Vacuum Chamber
                              > for creating bubble free silicone casts.
                              >
                              > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
                              > <mailto:diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication%40yahoogroups.com> , "Boman33"
                              > <boman33@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Normally casting or potting material is placed in a vacuum chamber after
                              > > mixing or after pouring if it was sloppily done or there is entrapped air.
                              > > This will release any trapped air and afterwards air pressure will force
                              > it
                              > > into small crevices.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > For potting critical electronic assemblies they are also placed in the
                              > > vacuum chamber together with the potting material and a vacuum is pulled.
                              > > After suitable outgassing time, they are lowered into the liquid while
                              > still
                              > > under vacuum. Once air pressure is returned it will force the potting
                              > > liquid deep inside the parts. (I used to set up factories for potting high
                              > > voltage transformers)
                              > >
                              > > Bertho
                              > >
                              > > +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                              > >
                              > > From: gotme2names Sent: Monday, April 04, 2011 11:57.
                              > >
                              > > My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is
                              > > the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is
                              > amazing.
                              > > If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.
                              >
                            • Michael Couch
                              Could you use a vacuum bag instead? Like carbon fiber fabing. Michael Couch
                              Message 14 of 15 , Apr 5, 2011
                                Could you use a vacuum bag instead? Like carbon fiber fabing.

                                Michael Couch

                                --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gotme2names" <gotme2names@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > http://oi53.tinypic.com/bxysi.jpg
                                >
                                > This stuff is sold by Silicone Inc. It's called "P-125"
                                >
                                > I just got off the phone with a tech who works there.
                                >
                                > She pretty sure that it will adhere and bond to glass when it cures.
                                >
                                > My sample piece is nearly bubble free, what really amazes me about this is the fact that is was not cured in a pressure pot. Seriously that is amazing. If it was cured in a pressure pot it would be bubble free.
                                >
                                > Check it it out. They sell an even better near optical clear silicone called XP-565. They are sending me a cured sample and a wet sample to test out.
                                >
                                > Junior if you have not found a solve the for the resin sticking to the plate. This might be it.
                                >
                                > But you need a pressure pot to get a real return result. That's the only way to cure bubble free castings. You could run a small amount onto the surface of the glass. Place it in a pressure pot and cure it. It will be clearer than the air cure sample it should bond with the glass. It doesn't have to be very thick either my sample piece is 10mm thick.
                                >
                                > Just trying to help. I want one of these machines so bad.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "gotme2names" <gotme2names@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Sorry to drag this post out so deeply from the past. I have been trying to catch up by reading all of Juniors posts related this his DLP printer.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > IS this were this Teflon idea ended? Does Jr still have to slide the the build area plate to free the resin from the build tray.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > I want to know if he solved this issue or not.
                                > >
                                > > If not I can start hunting down some optically clear silicones. Nothing sticks to cured silicone except silicone. Perfecto fish tank silicone will bond to glass but after it's cured nothing will stick to this silicone. Maybe a microthin coat would work.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > To prevent bubbles. You would cure the silicone ontop of the glass in a pressure pot.
                                > >
                                > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, vrsculptor@ wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Hi Adam,
                                > > > I obtained the teflon coated borosilicate glass for Junior. It turned out to be unusable, the coating was not transparent enough. I was not able to find a source for precoated teflon glass and had to go to a manufacturer who did coatings for industrial and medical firms. This took a lot of calls and time to set up.
                                > > >
                                > > > I haven't heard from Junior in weeks but last I heard he found a source for clear teflon film but was having problems bonding it to the glass. He was getting bubbles between the film and glass.
                                > > >
                                > > > We know from the Chinese white papers that they had success with using silicone coated glass. There are discussions elsewhere on this board.
                                > > >
                                > > > Another option might be to find a resin that didn't stick to glass.
                                > > >
                                > > > It sure would be great if someone could get a look at one of the commercial machines to see how they did it.
                                > > >
                                > > > Roger
                                > > >
                                > > > -- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "wildfactory1000" <wildfactory@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Hi List,
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Can anyone advise on where they are purchasing fep (teflon) coated glass? ( was it quartz instead of glass for the dlp machine?)
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Thanks!
                                > > > > Adam
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
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