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What's the highest resolution in 3D printer that you've seen?

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  • quazga
    I was wondering about this today. What is the highest resolution 3D printing method available for any material? What have you guys seen as far as high
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 12 5:33 AM
      I was wondering about this today. What is the highest resolution 3D printing method available for any material? What have you guys seen as far as high resolution. High resolution being, say, under 0.001 inches for X, Y and Z.

      Searching around I found this.

      http://www.solid-scape.com

      The X Y resolution is 0.0002 inches with layers in Z at 0.0005.

      It uses two wax materials, one being a support material and one being the part material.

      The two waxes are heated and dispersed via micro nozzles.

      Each layer is machined with what looks like a big 2 inch or so diameter milling cutter.

      After the build, the support wax is dissolved away relieving the part.

      Price. About $45,000 US

      If you know of something else, post a reply. No need to give a description, just a name of a machine, company or method would be fine.

      I know there are numerous micro fabrication methods too. Such as the various methods used for making Micro Electromechanical Systems. Posts any of those methods you may know about also if you want.
    • Sam
      This July I went to SIGGRAPH 2010 in LA, most of the major players were there, went to the BoF on 3D printing sponsored by Solidworks, they had some jewelery
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 12 2:26 PM
        This July I went to SIGGRAPH 2010 in LA, most of the major players were there, went to the BoF on 3D printing sponsored by Solidworks, they had some jewelery printed with brass powder.

        A few of the vendors on the floor began quoting me used deposition system prices in the 10k range.

        envisiontec had some machines that do Z @ .0004" (10.6 microns): http://www.envisiontec.com/index.php?id=45

        Even the most sophisticated state change deposition heads are producable for a couple hundred bucks (if that), the cost of the high-end (100k+) systems seemed to be in control board/system integration and calibration of a large chassis.

        For N/MEMS you need sub-micron scale masks for laser etching, but how to produce those masks? Again, the same chicken and egg dilemma that seems to be the crux of technological innovation these days...

        Sam Thigpen * KL1FE * http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/si-links#fabricators

        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "quazga" <quazga@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was wondering about this today. What is the highest resolution 3D printing method available for any material? What have you guys seen as far as high resolution. High resolution being, say, under 0.001 inches for X, Y and Z.
        >
        > Searching around I found this.
        >
        > http://www.solid-scape.com
        >
        > The X Y resolution is 0.0002 inches with layers in Z at 0.0005.
        >
        > It uses two wax materials, one being a support material and one being the part material.
        >
        > The two waxes are heated and dispersed via micro nozzles.
        >
        > Each layer is machined with what looks like a big 2 inch or so diameter milling cutter.
        >
        > After the build, the support wax is dissolved away relieving the part.
        >
        > Price. About $45,000 US
        >
        > If you know of something else, post a reply. No need to give a description, just a name of a machine, company or method would be fine.
        >
        > I know there are numerous micro fabrication methods too. Such as the various methods used for making Micro Electromechanical Systems. Posts any of those methods you may know about also if you want.
        >
      • quazga
        True true. Thanks for the info! =)
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 13 9:00 PM
          True true. Thanks for the info! =)

          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@...> wrote:
          >
          > This July I went to SIGGRAPH 2010 in LA, most of the major players were there, went to the BoF on 3D printing sponsored by Solidworks, they had some jewelery printed with brass powder.
          >
          > A few of the vendors on the floor began quoting me used deposition system prices in the 10k range.
          >
          > envisiontec had some machines that do Z @ .0004" (10.6 microns): http://www.envisiontec.com/index.php?id=45
          >
          > Even the most sophisticated state change deposition heads are producable for a couple hundred bucks (if that), the cost of the high-end (100k+) systems seemed to be in control board/system integration and calibration of a large chassis.
          >
          > For N/MEMS you need sub-micron scale masks for laser etching, but how to produce those masks? Again, the same chicken and egg dilemma that seems to be the crux of technological innovation these days...
          >
          > Sam Thigpen * KL1FE * http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/si-links#fabricators
          >
          > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "quazga" <quazga@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I was wondering about this today. What is the highest resolution 3D printing method available for any material? What have you guys seen as far as high resolution. High resolution being, say, under 0.001 inches for X, Y and Z.
          > >
          > > Searching around I found this.
          > >
          > > http://www.solid-scape.com
          > >
          > > The X Y resolution is 0.0002 inches with layers in Z at 0.0005.
          > >
          > > It uses two wax materials, one being a support material and one being the part material.
          > >
          > > The two waxes are heated and dispersed via micro nozzles.
          > >
          > > Each layer is machined with what looks like a big 2 inch or so diameter milling cutter.
          > >
          > > After the build, the support wax is dissolved away relieving the part.
          > >
          > > Price. About $45,000 US
          > >
          > > If you know of something else, post a reply. No need to give a description, just a name of a machine, company or method would be fine.
          > >
          > > I know there are numerous micro fabrication methods too. Such as the various methods used for making Micro Electromechanical Systems. Posts any of those methods you may know about also if you want.
          > >
          >
        • Sam
          ... That would be ShapeWays (http://www.shapeways.com) As posted here recently: http://www.sonoplot.com/products The GIX Microplotter II has a 5 micron feature
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 16, 2010
            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "quazga" <quazga@...> wrote:

            >> True true. Thanks for the info! =)

            > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@> wrote:

            >> This July I went to SIGGRAPH 2010 in LA, most of the major
            >> players were there, went to the BoF on 3D printing sponsored by
            >> Solidworks, they had some jewelery printed with brass powder.

            That would be ShapeWays (http://www.shapeways.com)

            As posted here recently:

            http://www.sonoplot.com/products

            The GIX Microplotter II has a 5 micron feature size in a "2D" plotting method using piezo pumped micro-pipettes.

            It is within the specification of micropipettes to lay down sub-micron droplets -- you could use the uv curing laser for near-field microscopy in order to get an accurate image.

            ---
            Sam Thigpen
            http://sthigpen.freeshell.org
          • Ian
            The nanoscribe is a commercial product that has a feature size around 450nm. Its the machine they used to make the meta-material black-hole . There are
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 18, 2010
              The nanoscribe is a commercial product that has a feature size around 450nm. Its the machine they used to make the meta-material "black-hole". There are experimental systems in development for using a scanning tunneling electron microscope to get single atom resolution.

              http://www.nanoscribe.de/
              http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-12-laser-3d-submicron.html
              http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-11-artificial-black-holes-metamaterials.html
              http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-10-atom-proper.html

              I know this doesn't exactly help with the diy projects yet as these are pretty cutting edge, but in 20 years it should be fairly achievable.

              --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "quazga" <quazga@> wrote:
              >
              > >> True true. Thanks for the info! =)
              >
              > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@> wrote:
              >
              > >> This July I went to SIGGRAPH 2010 in LA, most of the major
              > >> players were there, went to the BoF on 3D printing sponsored by
              > >> Solidworks, they had some jewelery printed with brass powder.
              >
              > That would be ShapeWays (http://www.shapeways.com)
              >
              > As posted here recently:
              >
              > http://www.sonoplot.com/products
              >
              > The GIX Microplotter II has a 5 micron feature size in a "2D" plotting method using piezo pumped micro-pipettes.
              >
              > It is within the specification of micropipettes to lay down sub-micron droplets -- you could use the uv curing laser for near-field microscopy in order to get an accurate image.
              >
              > ---
              > Sam Thigpen
              > http://sthigpen.freeshell.org
              >
            • Sam
              Thanks for the links! Their IP-photoresists sub-100nm system uses two-photon polymerization. Ti:sapphire femtosecond lasers are usually referenced for this
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 19, 2010
                Thanks for the links!

                Their "IP-photoresists" sub-100nm system uses two-photon polymerization.

                Ti:sapphire femtosecond lasers are usually referenced for this process.

                SEM is pretty cumbersome but can do .2nm (2 angstrom), digital holographic microscopy is now at 5nm.

                --
                Sam.

                http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/laser-links.html#si
                http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/laser-links.html#maglev


                --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Ian" <lone_cyclist@...> wrote:
                >
                > The nanoscribe is a commercial product that has a feature size around 450nm. Its the machine they used to make the meta-material "black-hole". There are experimental systems in development for using a scanning tunneling electron microscope to get single atom resolution.
                >
                > http://www.nanoscribe.de/
                > http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-12-laser-3d-submicron.html
                > http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-11-artificial-black-holes-metamaterials.html
                > http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-10-atom-proper.html
                >
                > I know this doesn't exactly help with the diy projects yet as these are pretty cutting edge, but in 20 years it should be fairly achievable.
                >
                > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@> wrote:
                > >
                > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "quazga" <quazga@> wrote:
                > >
                > > >> True true. Thanks for the info! =)
                > >
                > > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@> wrote:
                > >
                > > >> This July I went to SIGGRAPH 2010 in LA, most of the major
                > > >> players were there, went to the BoF on 3D printing sponsored by
                > > >> Solidworks, they had some jewelery printed with brass powder.
                > >
                > > That would be ShapeWays (http://www.shapeways.com)
                > >
                > > As posted here recently:
                > >
                > > http://www.sonoplot.com/products
                > >
                > > The GIX Microplotter II has a 5 micron feature size in a "2D" plotting method using piezo pumped micro-pipettes.
                > >
                > > It is within the specification of micropipettes to lay down sub-micron droplets -- you could use the uv curing laser for near-field microscopy in order to get an accurate image.
                > >
                > > ---
                > > Sam Thigpen
                > > http://sthigpen.freeshell.org
                > >
                >
              • Jack Coats
                Not to hijack the thread, but what is the current state of the art in DIY versions (given the name of this group, it should still be on subject :) The
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 19, 2010
                  Not to hijack the thread, but what is the current state of the art in
                  DIY versions (given the name of this group, it should still be on subject :)

                  The MakerBot/RepRap type seem to be 'crude' in the resolution dept, or
                  is that just me?

                  The power and glue deposition (like several in this group have done)
                  seems to have a finer resolution, even though
                  the resultant article is pretty fragile.

                  Are there others?

                    Thanks...
                • Sam
                  SLA - stereolithography which would encompass any rig that focuses UV light (laser collimated or not) on a point in UV curable fluid to harden it. The files
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 19, 2010
                    "SLA" - stereolithography

                    which would encompass any rig that focuses UV light (laser collimated or not) on a point in UV curable fluid to harden it.

                    The files area has some recipes on UV Curable Resins, also:

                    http://www.solarez.com/productsnew/UVpolyester.html
                    http://www.seasidesurfshop.com/Ding-All-Sun-Cure-Ultra-Clear-Instant-Resin.aspx

                    As far as how the polymer chain cures out at the molecular level (to determine scale and shape in nm range) you'd need to build up a data set scanning results based on curing emitter configuration/uv epoxy ingredients.

                    Injecting a liquid hardener to cure the resin would add another variable.

                    rerap forums has discussion on these methods:
                    http://forums.reprap.org/index.php

                    DIY is not a bad deal since the machines are $100k+. :-).
                    --
                    Sam.
                    http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/si-links.html#3dp


                    --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Jack Coats <jack@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Not to hijack the thread, but what is the current state of the art in
                    > DIY versions (given the name of this group, it should still be on subject :)
                    >
                    > The MakerBot/RepRap type seem to be 'crude' in the resolution dept, or
                    > is that just me?
                    >
                    > The power and glue deposition (like several in this group have done)
                    > seems to have a finer resolution, even though
                    > the resultant article is pretty fragile.
                    >
                    > Are there others?
                    >
                    > Thanks...
                    >
                  • The Stavole Family
                    I will also say that dentist use a uv catalyzed resin for fillings as well.
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 19, 2010
                      I will also say that dentist use a uv catalyzed resin for fillings as well.

                      http://www.hedwigvillagefamilydentistry.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/uv-light1.jpg


                      On Sun, 19 Dec 2010 14:16:18 -0800, Sam <sam_thigpen@...> wrote:

                      > "SLA" - stereolithography
                      >
                      > which would encompass any rig that focuses UV light (laser collimated or
                      > not) on a point in UV curable fluid to harden it.
                      >
                      > The files area has some recipes on UV Curable Resins, also:
                      >
                      > http://www.solarez.com/productsnew/UVpolyester.html
                      > http://www.seasidesurfshop.com/Ding-All-Sun-Cure-Ultra-Clear-Instant-Resin.aspx
                      >
                      > As far as how the polymer chain cures out at the molecular level (to
                      > determine scale and shape in nm range) you'd need to build up a data set
                      > scanning results based on curing emitter configuration/uv epoxy
                      > ingredients.
                      >
                      > Injecting a liquid hardener to cure the resin would add another variable.
                      >
                      > rerap forums has discussion on these methods:
                      > http://forums.reprap.org/index.php
                      >
                      > DIY is not a bad deal since the machines are $100k+. :-).
                      > --
                      > Sam.
                      > http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/si-links.html#3dp
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Jack Coats
                      > <jack@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Not to hijack the thread, but what is the current state of the art in
                      >> DIY versions (given the name of this group, it should still be on
                      >> subject :)
                      >>
                      >> The MakerBot/RepRap type seem to be 'crude' in the resolution dept, or
                      >> is that just me?
                      >>
                      >> The power and glue deposition (like several in this group have done)
                      >> seems to have a finer resolution, even though
                      >> the resultant article is pretty fragile.
                      >>
                      >> Are there others?
                      >>
                      >> Thanks...
                      >>
                      >
                      >


                      --
                      Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
                    • Sam
                      http://www.molecularimprints.com/technology/j_fil_overview.php Shows a combination of inkjet droplet deposition + capilary action (fluid viscosity, etc) +
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 27, 2010
                        http://www.molecularimprints.com/technology/j_fil_overview.php

                        Shows a combination of inkjet droplet deposition + "capilary
                        action" (fluid viscosity, etc) + masks/templates (some e-beam generated) + nudged beam/etched-element via piezos, magnets, etc. (double, nX imprinting) to get sub 20nm resolution.

                        R&D using (I guess) a similar method:

                        http://www.molecularimprints.com/technology/resolution_pattern_transfer.php

                        shows a 2.4nm single wall carbon nanotube generated by imprint lithography.

                        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "Sam" <sam_thigpen@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > "SLA" - stereolithography
                        >
                        > which would encompass any rig that focuses UV light (laser collimated or not) on a point in UV curable fluid to harden it.
                        >
                        > The files area has some recipes on UV Curable Resins, also:
                        >
                        > http://www.solarez.com/productsnew/UVpolyester.html
                        > http://www.seasidesurfshop.com/Ding-All-Sun-Cure-Ultra-Clear-Instant-Resin.aspx
                        >
                        > As far as how the polymer chain cures out at the molecular level (to determine scale and shape in nm range) you'd need to build up a data set scanning results based on curing emitter configuration/uv epoxy ingredients.
                        >
                        > Injecting a liquid hardener to cure the resin would add another variable.
                        >
                        > rerap forums has discussion on these methods:
                        > http://forums.reprap.org/index.php
                        >
                        > DIY is not a bad deal since the machines are $100k+. :-).
                        > --
                        > Sam.
                        > http://sthigpen.freeshell.org/si-links.html#3dp
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Jack Coats <jack@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Not to hijack the thread, but what is the current state of the art in
                        > > DIY versions (given the name of this group, it should still be on subject :)
                        > >
                        > > The MakerBot/RepRap type seem to be 'crude' in the resolution dept, or
                        > > is that just me?
                        > >
                        > > The power and glue deposition (like several in this group have done)
                        > > seems to have a finer resolution, even though
                        > > the resultant article is pretty fragile.
                        > >
                        > > Are there others?
                        > >
                        > > Thanks...
                        > >
                        >
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