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3D patent expirations in less than 30 days

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  • Henry Liu
    Looks like 3D printing is going to hit the public domain in about a month. The original MIT 3d printing patent 5204055 is set to expire on April 20, 2010.
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 25, 2010
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      Looks like 3D printing is going to hit the public domain in about a month.
       
      The original MIT 3d printing patent 5204055 is set to expire on April 20, 2010.
       
      Issued 1993 (before 1995 is 17 years, 1993+17=2010).  First application date was 1989 (20 years after is 2009).  Longer of the two is April 20, 2010.
       
      In addition, all "child" continuation patents should be expiring at the same time:
      5,807,437 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES 
      5,387,380 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
      6,036,777 POWDER DISPENSING APPARATUS USING VIBRATION
      Patent Expired Due to NonPayment of Maintenance Fees Under 37 CFR 1.362
      5,340,656 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
      5,807,437  THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING SYSTEM
       
      The expiring claims cover:
      inkjet printing for 3d printing
      using powder for 3d printing
      using a liquid binder for 3d printing
      using a roller for spreading
      using pistons for the z axis
       
      Seems like everything important has expired and looks like free for all now.
       
      Things that might not be expired:
      specific compounds for powders/binders
       
      Any comments?
       
    • **ricardo pirroni**
      this came from one of the people on the 3d printing yahoo group interesting actually, I just couldn t understand why no-one was using an inkjet style printing
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 25, 2010
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        this came from one of the people on the 3d printing yahoo group

        interesting actually, I just couldn't understand why no-one was using an inkjet style printing process which would seem like the most obvious tech as we already have it commercialised and commoditised.

        But it seems that it was quite patented indeed - But won't someone just renew?

        hmmm...

        Rick



        On 25 March 2010 19:34, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
         

        Looks like 3D printing is going to hit the public domain in about a month.
         
        The original MIT 3d printing patent 5204055 is set to expire on April 20, 2010.
         
        Issued 1993 (before 1995 is 17 years, 1993+17=2010).  First application date was 1989 (20 years after is 2009).  Longer of the two is April 20, 2010.
         
        In addition, all "child" continuation patents should be expiring at the same time:
        5,807,437 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES 
        5,387,380 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
        6,036,777 POWDER DISPENSING APPARATUS USING VIBRATION
        Patent Expired Due to NonPayment of Maintenance Fees Under 37 CFR 1.362
        5,340,656 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
        5,807,437  THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING SYSTEM
         
        The expiring claims cover:
        inkjet printing for 3d printing
        using powder for 3d printing
        using a liquid binder for 3d printing
        using a roller for spreading
        using pistons for the z axis
         
        Seems like everything important has expired and looks like free for all now.
         
        Things that might not be expired:
        specific compounds for powders/binders
         
        Any comments?
         


      • Henry Liu
        You can t renew patents - that s the whole point. 17 years of exclusive use before 1995 and 20 years after 1995. When they expire anyone can make it. On Thu,
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 25, 2010
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          You can't renew patents - that's the whole point.  17 years of exclusive use before 1995 and 20 years after 1995.
           
          When they expire anyone can make it.
           
          On Thu, Mar 25, 2010 at 12:47 PM, **ricardo pirroni** <rick@...> wrote:
           

          this came from one of the people on the 3d printing yahoo group


          interesting actually, I just couldn't understand why no-one was using an inkjet style printing process which would seem like the most obvious tech as we already have it commercialised and commoditised.

          But it seems that it was quite patented indeed - But won't someone just renew?

          hmmm...

          Rick



          On 25 March 2010 19:34, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
           

          Looks like 3D printing is going to hit the public domain in about a month.
           
          The original MIT 3d printing patent 5204055 is set to expire on April 20, 2010.
           
          Issued 1993 (before 1995 is 17 years, 1993+17=2010).  First application date was 1989 (20 years after is 2009).  Longer of the two is April 20, 2010.
           
          In addition, all "child" continuation patents should be expiring at the same time:
          5,807,437 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES 
          5,387,380 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
          6,036,777 POWDER DISPENSING APPARATUS USING VIBRATION
          Patent Expired Due to NonPayment of Maintenance Fees Under 37 CFR 1.362
          5,340,656 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
          5,807,437  THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING SYSTEM
           
          The expiring claims cover:
          inkjet printing for 3d printing
          using powder for 3d printing
          using a liquid binder for 3d printing
          using a roller for spreading
          using pistons for the z axis
           
          Seems like everything important has expired and looks like free for all now.
           
          Things that might not be expired:
          specific compounds for powders/binders
           
          Any comments?
           



        • Jack@coats.org
          At least in the USA, patents have interum renewal dates that require additional fees be paid to the patent office. I think you are right about the maximum
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 25, 2010
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            At least in the USA, patents have interum renewal dates that require additional fees be paid to the patent office.
            I think you are right about the maximum renewal dates, but it can be shorter if fees are not paid.  Expect
            it to take a while before notes to be posted in case renewal fees are paid.

            ><> ... Jack
            Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart... Colossians 3:23



            On Thu, Mar 25, 2010 at 3:10 PM, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:

            You can't renew patents - that's the whole point.  17 years of exclusive use before 1995 and 20 years after 1995.
             
            When they expire anyone can make it.
             
            On Thu, Mar 25, 2010 at 12:47 PM, **ricardo pirroni** <rick@...> wrote:
             

            this came from one of the people on the 3d printing yahoo group


            interesting actually, I just couldn't understand why no-one was using an inkjet style printing process which would seem like the most obvious tech as we already have it commercialised and commoditised.

            But it seems that it was quite patented indeed - But won't someone just renew?

            hmmm...

            Rick



            On 25 March 2010 19:34, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
             

            Looks like 3D printing is going to hit the public domain in about a month.
             
            The original MIT 3d printing patent 5204055 is set to expire on April 20, 2010.
             
            Issued 1993 (before 1995 is 17 years, 1993+17=2010).  First application date was 1989 (20 years after is 2009).  Longer of the two is April 20, 2010.
             
            In addition, all "child" continuation patents should be expiring at the same time:
            5,807,437 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES 
            5,387,380 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
            6,036,777 POWDER DISPENSING APPARATUS USING VIBRATION
            Patent Expired Due to NonPayment of Maintenance Fees Under 37 CFR 1.362
            5,340,656 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
            5,807,437  THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING SYSTEM
             
            The expiring claims cover:
            inkjet printing for 3d printing
            using powder for 3d printing
            using a liquid binder for 3d printing
            using a roller for spreading
            using pistons for the z axis
             
            Seems like everything important has expired and looks like free for all now.
             
            Things that might not be expired:
            specific compounds for powders/binders
             
            Any comments?
             






          • maggyrond
            Have you ever seen a Turkish baklava baker at work? They add very thin layers of flour to their dough by creating a cloud of flour dust and letting that rain
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 26, 2010
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              Have you ever seen a Turkish baklava baker at work? They add very thin layers of flour to their dough by creating a cloud of flour dust and letting that "rain" down. That technique is hundreds or even thousands of years old, no need to worry about patents.

              Silk screen printing is also a very ancient technique to apply thin layers of material, from China or Japan AFAIK.

              I don't understand that nobody ever objected the part about using pistons and rollers in the patent. Patent laws clearly state that it is not possible to renew patents on old techniques by simply giving them a new way of using them. If that would be possible every new apparatus using axles and bearings could patent through the back door the use of axles and bearings...
            • raiorz
              ... Yes and no: This technique is patent free for bakers work. This means (patent law): This technique for this application is public knowledge, because it is
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 26, 2010
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                > Have you ever seen a Turkish baklava baker at work? They add very thin layers of flour to their dough by creating a cloud of flour dust and letting that "rain" down. That technique is hundreds or even thousands of years old, no need to worry about patents.

                Yes and no: This technique is patent free for bakers work. This means (patent law): This technique for this application is public knowledge, because it is older than 20 years.
                But... if you use the same technique for a different application, it would be a new idea and well: you can get a new patent.

                Rai
              • maggyrond
                Because I threw these techniques, using a cloud of dust to create an even layer and using silk screen printing technique to create 3d objects, today in the
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 26, 2010
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                  Because I threw these techniques, using a cloud of dust to create an even layer and using silk screen printing technique to create 3d objects, today in the public domain and because these have not yet been patented (AFAIK) nobody has the right to patent them from now on.

                  quote wikipedia:Novelty is a patentability requirement. An invention is not patentable if the claimed subject matter was disclosed before the date of filing, or before the date of priority if a priority is claimed, of the patent application.
                • afogassa
                  Hummm, I see no reference to dental plaster as build powder. should I fill a patent ? :-) I´ll take a better look at those patents for shure.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 26, 2010
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                    Hummm, I see no reference to dental plaster as build powder. should I fill a patent ? :-)
                    I´ll take a better look at those patents for shure.

                    --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Henry Liu <henryjliu@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Looks like 3D printing is going to hit the public domain in about a month.
                    >
                    > The original MIT 3d printing patent 5204055 is set to expire on April 20,
                    > 2010.
                    >
                    > Issued 1993 (before 1995 is 17 years, 1993+17=2010). First application date
                    > was 1989 (20 years after is 2009). Longer of the two is April 20, 2010.
                    >
                    > In addition, all "child" continuation patents should be expiring at the same
                    > time:
                    > 5,807,437 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
                    > 5,387,380 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
                    > 6,036,777 POWDER DISPENSING APPARATUS USING VIBRATION
                    > Patent Expired Due to NonPayment of Maintenance Fees Under 37 CFR 1.362
                    > 5,340,656 THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTING TECHNIQUES
                    > 5,807,437 THREE DIMENSIONAL PRINTING SYSTEM
                    >
                    > The expiring claims cover:
                    > inkjet printing for 3d printing
                    > using powder for 3d printing
                    > using a liquid binder for 3d printing
                    > using a roller for spreading
                    > using pistons for the z axis
                    >
                    > Seems like everything important has expired and looks like free for all now.
                    >
                    > Things that might not be expired:
                    > specific compounds for powders/binders
                    >
                    > Any comments?
                    >
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