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Re: Plaster, porcelain, etc.

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  • Andrew Werby
    Rob Jansen rob@myvoice.nl ligfietser2003 wrote: Date: Wed Oct 8, 2008 9:57 am ((PDT)) ... Thanks, previous posts talked about the green slip but I had no
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 9, 2008
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      "Rob Jansen" rob@... ligfietser2003 wrote:
          Date: Wed Oct 8, 2008 9:57 am ((PDT))
      
      
       [What are you referring to here? The link above refers to the 
      > traditional method of ceramic slip casting.
        
      Thanks, previous posts talked about the green slip but I had no idea
      what it meant or was. That's one of the problems, being not native
      english speaking, there are still a lot of things I do not know.
      
      [Slip is clay mixed with water and a "deflocculant" like sodium silicate that allows it to form a smooth liquid with a minimum of water. It is usually poured into plaster molds, forming a fragile shell that only attains any strength and hardness after being fired in a kiln. It's referred to as "green" when it's unfired, and "bisque" after an initial firing.]
      
      
      
      > www.computersculpture.com
        
      nice stuff. A bit of an OT question: I have an old Microscribe from
      Immersion (the first red model with serial interface). Is there still
      software available to integrate that one into Rhino?
      I  have some basic software that imports 3D coordinates into excel but
      have no idea how to work it with Rhino.
      
      Regards,
      
      Rob
      
      [You shouldn't need any extra software to get your Microscribe working under Rhino.  Once it's hooked up, go into the Digitizer tab of Rhino's Tools menu, and click "connect". It will ask you to pick a point on the X axis, then on the Y axis (of an imaginary grid laid out around the object you're digitizing), and to hit "enter". Then you can start picking points on your object - I usually make networks of intersecting curves, using the InterpCrv command, which can be turned into surfaces using the NetworkSrf command. Let me know off-list if you have problems with this; it's not particularly on-topic here.]
      
      Andrew Werby
      www.computersculpture.com
      
      
      
      
      
      
      
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