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7976Re: vibratory polisher for post processing

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  • richkang78
    Feb 5 12:14 PM
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      You left the parts in shaker for a few months? That sounds like an extremely long time! I think those who clean/polish brass shells don't usually exceed 2 days with walnut. But the fact that you didn't see any results is surprising. Thanks for the info!

      Rich

      --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "cadcamtrav" wrote:
      >
      > I left some viper parts I did at .001" in Amethyst resin in a vibratory shaker tumbler for a few months using walnut shells just for kicks. Sadly, no results at all. They just looked "dusty" for the lack of a better term. When I upped the media grit power I started breaking parts.
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      > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
      > >
      > > Thanks for your response Peter. The polisher I have in mind seems to be quite different in operation from the magnetic polisher you describe. The vibratory ones don't require liquid immersion, some suggest a few tablespoons of water added to media in certain instances. But many run dry media only. The grinding media can also be non-metallic/magnetic which would increase the range of choices for media hardness.
      > >
      > > Rich
      > >
      > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "pzamov" wrote:
      > > >
      > > > @Group
      > > > I have a needle magnetic polisher for metals - mainly silver and gold.
      > > >
      > > > It uses 5mm X 0.3mm and 5mm X 0.5mm pins. There are 1mm available, but Cherry pits/ Plastic media/wood media is far too coarse for that kind of work.
      > > >
      > > > Also the parts will have to be submerged in Water/oil/alcohol for all this to work. Most resins have a great deal of problems with absorption or delamination from water/alcohol, so it is another problem that needs to be solved.
      > > >
      > > > For coarse work maybe it can work, but there is still the problem: In what media would you submerge the objects as it should not be a viscous.
      > > >
      > > > Cheers!
      > > >
      > > > Peter
      > > > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, "richkang78" wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Group,
      > > > >
      > > > > I am wondering if anyone has experience using a vibratory polisher to post process printed parts. The kind I am referring to is the same used to clean bullet casings. This is basically to clean up the fine "stair stepped" surface on parts. I can print at a higher z resolution to make these very very small, but at .003" per step, which allows for a reasonably fast print rate, the steps are more obvious and though not very noticeable, still effect the surface finish.
      > > > >
      > > > > My own research has led me to these types of potential tumbling media:
      > > > > 1)crushed walnut shell
      > > > > 2)hardwood media (various shapes)
      > > > > 3)plastic media (various shapes)
      > > > >
      > > > > Anyone have experience with an optimal medium?
      > > > >
      > > > > I understand that this type of processing will clearly erode unintended features of the part, but there appears to be few options to this other than hand sanding. I believe features that you do not want to have eroded can be coated with some type of protective layer (ie taping, caulking).
      > > > >
      > > > > Rich
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
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