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Re: [ditkomania] Re: Ditko's Strange Tales

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  • Bruce Buchanan
    Both of those explanations make a lot of sense, Jim and Mark. The FF was Marvel s top-selling book in those days, so I get that the Torch would have
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 2010
      Both of those explanations make a lot of sense, Jim and Mark. The FF was Marvel's top-selling book in those days, so I get that the Torch would have considerable market appeal.
       
      And perhaps Dr. Strange isn't a character with the mass commercial appeal of, say, Spider-Man or the FF. He may be a bit too weird and quirky for the mainstream. But, man, did Diko ever weave some great stories in those back-up pages. I'd be hard-pressed to argue that his pen and brush weren't enchanted!
       
      Bruce


      From: Mark Clegg <markclegg@...>
      To: ditkomania@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, November 23, 2010 10:32:10 PM
      Subject: Re: [ditkomania] Re: Ditko's Strange Tales

       

      Maybe it was because DC was having a lot of success with teenage heroes? And not so much with mystics?
       
      mc

      On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 12:26 PM, Jim Salicrup <salicrup@...> wrote:
       

      Perhaps it was the fact that The Human Torch was a major Timely title—one of the big three heroes—whereas Dr. Strange was relatively unknown. (Both Sub-Mariner and Captain America were given strips in those split books, and seemed to do very well.)

       

      Jim

       

      From: Bruce Buchanan [mailto:brucebuchanan53@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 11:22 AM
      To: ditkomania@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [ditkomania] Re: Ditko's Strange Tales

       

       

      Thanks, Nick! That makes sense.

       

      It's kind of weird, in retrospect, that Marvel promoted the Human Torch stories as the "main attraction" and Dr. Strange as the back-up. I mean, I get that the Fantastic Four was Marvel's top-selling book, but most of these Human Torch stories are really awful, while Ditko was turning in masterpiece after masterpiece on Dr. Strange.

       

      I don't think that's just my Ditko bias talking, either - I can't imagine many fans reading both stories and finding the Torch features more enjoyable. They are a far cry from what Lee & Kirby were doing on the FF.

       


      From: nick <caputon66@...>
      To: ditkomania@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, November 9, 2010 2:59:00 PM
      Subject: [ditkomania] Re: Ditko's Strange Tales

       

      Bruce,

      Covers were usually prepared last at Marvel in that period, so it is likely that Jack Kirby, who drew most of the covers, based his Dr. Strange vignettes on the story Ditko had drawn. A few covers had inserts taken from the interior Ditko story, but you're correct that Ditko drew no new Dr. Strange art on the Strange Tales covers.

      Nick C.

      --- In ditkomania@yahoogroups.com, "brucebuchanan53" <brucebuchanan53@...> wrote:
      >
      > I recently picked up the Essential Human Torch, which reprints the "other half" of the Strange Tales comics featuring Ditko's legendary work on Dr. Strange. At the time, the book, like several other Marvel titles, was divided into two sections. The Human Torch generally took the lead story and the cover, while Dr. Strange had the back-up story.
      >
      > Here's a question: Several of the covers feature secondary art of Dr. Strange. It doesn't appear to me that Ditko drew these images. However, it looks like the cover artist was trying to recreate Ditko's work from the story inside. Does anyone know how the cover art was handled for this series?
      >
      > Also, I was surprised at just how bad some of these Human Torch stories are. I mean, Silver Age Marvel brings to mind the Ditko/Kirby/Lee classics, but these Human Torch stories come across like the campiest DC tales from the era. Half the time, the creative team doesn't even seem to know what powers the Torch has.
      >

       



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