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Re: Scultetus Binders]

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  • Marjorie Ramsay
    I remember making those binders years ago in Britain. I have been trying to remember where and when,I thought at first it was in High School for the Guild of
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 13, 2002
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      I remember making those binders years ago in Britain. I have been
      trying to remember where and when,I thought at first it was in High
      School for the "Guild of Goodwill" but now I come to think of it , it
      was during the war when I belonged to a group working for the Red Cross.
      We were given the materials and shown what to do and I remember
      "herringbone stitch" the strips on to the big square. We just called
      them "many-tailed bandages". Marjorie Ramsay

      Donna Coulter wrote:

      > Judith et all;
      > Well I'll be jiggered-- I haven't thought of Scultetus
      > Binders for years. We used them in the hospital in which I
      > trained, Winnipeg General, in the late 40's. They were a
      > blessing for giving support.
      > The crocheted or knitted ones were probably an alternate
      > when they needed to have a bit of 'give'.
      > They were alway's used for post operative care for abdominal
      > surgery and for new mothers.
      > They were an alternative for binding cracked ribs--- back
      > when they strapped ribs----.
      > I LOVE HISTORICAL TRIVIA.
      >
      > Thanks yuh all
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Judith Rempel" <rempel@...>
      > To: "dist-gen list" <dist-gen@...>
      > Sent: 12 December, 2002 5:15 AM
      > Subject: [Fwd: Re: Scultetus Binders]
      >
      > > Historical trivia - thought some on the list might be
      > interested in this
      > > bit of social/medical history.
      > >
      > >
      > > -------- Original Message --------
      > > Subject: Re: Scultetus Binders
      > > Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 22:44:21 -0500 (EST)
      > > From: AnnaGieschen@...
      > > Reply-To: sthc-l@...
      > > To: sthc-l@...
      > >
      > > This was one of the first things I learned in my first job
      > as a nursing
      > > assistant in a small town in 1967, and haven't heard of
      > for years! There
      > > was
      > > a central rectangular piece of fabric (about the length of
      > a human from
      > > chest
      > > to hips) with strips coming off each each side. (strips
      > about 2 inches wide
      > > and maybe 2 feet long). They would have to have been sewn
      > from firmly woven
      > > fabric to be functional, I think. I think most crocheting
      > or knitting would
      > > have too much stretch, but they would be easy to sew from
      > muslin or
      > > something
      > > like that. When we first had someone sit up after an
      > abdominal surgery, we
      > > first slipped the fabric under them while they were lying
      > down on their
      > > backs, and then, alternating strips from each side,
      > crossed and tucked them
      > > snugly across their abdomen to support their incision so
      > they could move
      > > without hurting so much. I was told that the name referred
      > to "many tails",
      > > the many strips of cloth that comprised the binder. There
      > was a definite
      > > knack to be learned to do the crossing and tucking part to
      > get it just snug
      > > enough to support but not compress the incision, and have
      > it stay in place
      > > while the patient was helped into a chair. Elastic ones
      > with zippers were
      > > beginning to replace them by the time I got good at it,
      > but I think they
      > > had
      > > probably been used from time immemorial. If you'd like to
      > know more, I can
      > > ask the retired nursing alumni who run the medical museum
      > at the hospital
      > > here.
      > >
      > > Anna Gieschen MALS AHIP - Reference Services
      > > Wegner Health Sciences Information Center - Sioux Falls,
      > South Dakota
      > >
      > > In a message dated 12/10/02 3:16:54 PM Central Standard
      > Time,
      > > DSokolow@... writes:
      > >
      > > << Pardon the cross-posts, and the ignorance.
      > >
      > > Can anyone explain to me fairly simply, what a Scultetus
      > Binder is? I'm
      > > getting the impression it's a sort of girdle thingy.
      > >
      > > It came up in an oral history I did, and the subject
      > suggested that
      > > she and
      > > others in the Auxiliary actually made these for the
      > Hospital via knitting,
      > > crocheting or some related skill. I can't quite make
      > out the word on the
      > > tape, but this seems to be the most likely reading.
      > >
      > > Are those the sorts of things regular folks could have
      > produced (this
      > > is ca.
      > > World War II)?
      > >
      > > Thanks in advance,
      > >
      > > DS
      > >
      > > ______________________________________
      > > Daniel Sokolow, Archives Coordinator
      > > David Taylor Archives
      > > North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System
      > > 155 Community Drive
      > > Great Neck, NY 11021
      > > mailto:dsokolow@...
      > >
      > > >>
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > In Kinship,
      > > Judith Rempel, Webster
      > > rempel@...
      > >
      > > and
      > >
      > > webster@...
      > > Alberta Family Histories Society
      > > http://www.afhs.ab.ca
      > >
      > > Canadian Genealogical Projects Register
      > > http://www.afhs.ab.ca/registry/
      > >
      > > http://www.afhs.ab.ca
      > >
      > >
      >
      > http://www.afhs.ab.ca

      http://www.afhs.ab.ca
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