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Re: [Fwd: Re: Scultetus Binders]

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  • RM McLean
    From RoseMarie McLean: When I entered nursing training (as it was called and now is politically incorrect) in 1955 at the Winnipeg General Hospital, the
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 11, 2002
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      From RoseMarie McLean:

      When I entered nursing training (as it was called and now is politically
      incorrect) in 1955 at the Winnipeg General Hospital, the Scultetus
      Binder was an important item on both surgical and obstetrical wards.
      Used for abdominal surgeries and post cesearean sections there was a
      need to balance the tightness for the level of support and comfort in
      its application. This binder was usually assessed and re-applied every
      four hours (10-2-6-10 during the day) and prior to getting the patient
      out of bed. The frequent assessment was to determine bleeding level,
      dressing change and healing. Getting out of bed post-surgically was many
      more days after surgery than today, which is usually calculated in
      minutes and/or hours and it was felt that support was needed.

      I recall the binder being well sewn to eliminate stretch and made of a
      flannel type material for softness and comfort. Not quite the same but
      applied to a newborn was the belly binder. A four inch peice of cloth
      that was wound around the newborn's abdomen to cover and support the cut
      umbilicus. I think it was thought that it would prevent a hernia. Plain
      binders about 15 inches wide were usd on new mothers to either give
      support to support the milk-producing breasts or put on quite tight to
      help suppress milk production.


      Genealogy -- chasing your own tale!

      RoseMarie McLean
      Mathom House Box #954
      Kaslo BC Canada
      VOG 1MO

      RoseMarie McLean
      176 Lynnwood Drive S. E.
      Calgary AB Canada
      T2C OS9

      http://www.afhs.ab.ca
    • Judith Rempel
      Historical trivia - thought some on the list might be interested in this bit of social/medical history. ... Subject: Re: Scultetus Binders Date: Tue, 10 Dec
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 12, 2002
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        Historical trivia - thought some on the list might be interested in this
        bit of social/medical history.


        -------- Original Message --------
        Subject: Re: Scultetus Binders
        Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 22:44:21 -0500 (EST)
        From: AnnaGieschen@...
        Reply-To: sthc-l@...
        To: sthc-l@...

        This was one of the first things I learned in my first job as a nursing
        assistant in a small town in 1967, and haven't heard of for years! There
        was
        a central rectangular piece of fabric (about the length of a human from
        chest
        to hips) with strips coming off each each side. (strips about 2 inches wide
        and maybe 2 feet long). They would have to have been sewn from firmly woven
        fabric to be functional, I think. I think most crocheting or knitting would
        have too much stretch, but they would be easy to sew from muslin or
        something
        like that. When we first had someone sit up after an abdominal surgery, we
        first slipped the fabric under them while they were lying down on their
        backs, and then, alternating strips from each side, crossed and tucked them
        snugly across their abdomen to support their incision so they could move
        without hurting so much. I was told that the name referred to "many tails",
        the many strips of cloth that comprised the binder. There was a definite
        knack to be learned to do the crossing and tucking part to get it just snug
        enough to support but not compress the incision, and have it stay in place
        while the patient was helped into a chair. Elastic ones with zippers were
        beginning to replace them by the time I got good at it, but I think they
        had
        probably been used from time immemorial. If you'd like to know more, I can
        ask the retired nursing alumni who run the medical museum at the hospital
        here.

        Anna Gieschen MALS AHIP - Reference Services
        Wegner Health Sciences Information Center - Sioux Falls, South Dakota

        In a message dated 12/10/02 3:16:54 PM Central Standard Time,
        DSokolow@... writes:

        << Pardon the cross-posts, and the ignorance.

        Can anyone explain to me fairly simply, what a Scultetus Binder is? I'm
        getting the impression it's a sort of girdle thingy.

        It came up in an oral history I did, and the subject suggested that
        she and
        others in the Auxiliary actually made these for the Hospital via knitting,
        crocheting or some related skill. I can't quite make out the word on the
        tape, but this seems to be the most likely reading.

        Are those the sorts of things regular folks could have produced (this
        is ca.
        World War II)?

        Thanks in advance,

        DS

        ______________________________________
        Daniel Sokolow, Archives Coordinator
        David Taylor Archives
        North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System
        155 Community Drive
        Great Neck, NY 11021
        mailto:dsokolow@...

        >>


        --
        In Kinship,
        Judith Rempel, Webster
        rempel@...

        and

        webster@...
        Alberta Family Histories Society
        http://www.afhs.ab.ca

        Canadian Genealogical Projects Register
        http://www.afhs.ab.ca/registry/

        http://www.afhs.ab.ca
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