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Re: census

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  • Kalbach
    We need the data from the long form. Ethnic origin data are particularly important for academic research and genealogical research. Madeline. Kalbach, Ph.D. U
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2010
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      We need the data from the long form. Ethnic origin data are
      particularly important for academic research and genealogical research.
      Madeline. Kalbach, Ph.D.
      U of C

      Sent from my iPod

      On 2010-07-01, at 11:37 AM, Lois Sparling <lsparling@...> wrote:

      > An article on the latest efforts of Statistics Canada to block the
      > use of the census as a historical resort was published in
      > theVancouver Sun June 29. The story is coming out via Eastman's
      > Online Genealogy Newsletter and Global Genealogy eNews. The family
      > history community was very effective in getting the release of past
      > census returns, but it was a long fight involving hundreds of us.
      >
      > I have to say that some of us thought that the more intrusive long
      > form census returns were the reason for the concern over release of
      > census returns after 92 years and suggested that perhaps StatsCan
      > shouldn't be asking such intrusive questions. However, it seems odd
      > that agricultural questionnaires are to be kept hidden. How
      > personal are questions about #s of livestock and fertilizer used?
      > We need to know more.
      > Are the regular short form census returns going to be released after
      > 92 years or not? Has Stats Canada gotten rid of that consent check
      > box that would block access to the short form census returns if
      > someone failed to check the box, giving consent?
      >
      > Lois Sparling
      >
      >
      >
    • Xenia Stanford
      Our next issue of Chinook focuses on Culture and Customs. Census data helps us see the cultural web of a country through such things as ethnicity. We can t
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 2010
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        Our next issue of Chinook focuses on Culture and Customs. Census data helps
        us see the cultural web of a country through such things as ethnicity. We
        can't find out about when and where and why people settled and what that
        means to us as family historians/genealogists and researchers, among others.
        We have space for more articles in the upcoming issue. I hope one or more of
        you articulate, impassioned people on this topic could write an article on
        the importance of the census for this and other reasons. If I receive enough
        articles on this topic, I would even change the focus of the issue to the
        importance of the census. Then we could send copies of the issue to the
        relevant ministers and the Prime Minister. The deadline is August 1st. We
        have an opportunity. Let's use it.

        Did you know that census-taking has existed since BC? That is why Joseph and
        Mary had to return to Bethlehem when she was 9 months pregnant - the Roman
        Emperor Augustus decreed everyone must return to their town of origin to be
        recorded there. Also 580 AD was the first recorded destruction of the census
        by the government in power. Queen Fredegund and King Chilperic in
        continental Europe lost two children. They were told this was because of the
        census, so they destroyed the records already in existence and decided not
        to continue to take censuses thereafter. Likewise, our government must have
        some dark age superstition driving them.

        Xenia Stanford
        Editor, Chinook, 2008 Winner of the National Genealogical Society Local
        Newsletter Award
        Email; editor-chinook@...
        Phone: 295-3490; Fax: 274-0564
        Alberta Family Histories Society
        http://www.afhs.ab.ca/

        -----Original Message-----
        From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...] On Behalf
        Of Kalbach
        Sent: July 1, 2010 5:50 PM
        To: Lois Sparling
        Cc: AFHS; Gordon Watts
        Subject: Re: census

        We need the data from the long form. Ethnic origin data are
        particularly important for academic research and genealogical research.
        Madeline. Kalbach, Ph.D.
        U of C

        Sent from my iPod

        On 2010-07-01, at 11:37 AM, Lois Sparling <lsparling@...> wrote:

        > An article on the latest efforts of Statistics Canada to block the
        > use of the census as a historical resort was published in
        > theVancouver Sun June 29. The story is coming out via Eastman's
        > Online Genealogy Newsletter and Global Genealogy eNews. The family
        > history community was very effective in getting the release of past
        > census returns, but it was a long fight involving hundreds of us.
        >
        > I have to say that some of us thought that the more intrusive long
        > form census returns were the reason for the concern over release of
        > census returns after 92 years and suggested that perhaps StatsCan
        > shouldn't be asking such intrusive questions. However, it seems odd
        > that agricultural questionnaires are to be kept hidden. How
        > personal are questions about #s of livestock and fertilizer used?
        > We need to know more.
        > Are the regular short form census returns going to be released after
        > 92 years or not? Has Stats Canada gotten rid of that consent check
        > box that would block access to the short form census returns if
        > someone failed to check the box, giving consent?
        >
        > Lois Sparling
        >
        >
        >
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