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Fwd: Genetic Progress?

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  • Brian Bradley
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 22 1:35 PM
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      Begin forwarded message:

      From: Brian Bradley <bcbrad3@...>
      Date: June 22, 2010 13:39:27 PM MDT (CA)
      To: Dan Bradley <dbradley@...>
      Cc: ANN WILLIAMS <astridge@...>
      Subject: Genetic Progress?

      Howdy Dan,
         Thank you very much for your generous reply.
      Mark Bradley (b. circa 1792, Derry County, possibly Ballynascreen Parish) married a Rose Ann Loughlin/Laughlin (b. circa 1795, possibly Ballynascreen or Draperstown parish, Derry County) and had two children (Rose Ann, b. circa 1827; and Mary, b. circa 1828) before coming to Canada in 1830 (where they had 4 boys: Mark, b. circa 1831; Henry - my GGrandfather, b. circa 1834; Lawrence, b. circa 1836; and James, b. circa 1839).  Henry married a Catherine McGuire and had 16-17 children on the farm in Mountain Township, Dundas County, Ontario, Canada ..... at least 3 or 4 of whom migrated to the U.S.A., as about 25 years ago I received an album from a great cousin living in the southwest U.S.A.
         I have heard 'bits' about your efforts in Y chromosome research along the genetic (family heritage) lines, but was unaware that you actually had some records on the Bradley line.
         Although use of the word "haplotypes" is far beyond my awareness of genetics, I would be very interested in knowing if there was a way in which I could compare my Y chromosome with the records that you have accumulated.
         The only area in NW Ireland of which I am aware is Donegal County where I stayed for one night in an Inn bordering Donegal and Londonderry counties for one night.  While staying at that in (circa summer of 1975), I decided to sample a pint of Guinness in it's own bar.  While casually 'passing the time of day' with the barkeep, almost everyone who entered that bar gave me some rather odd looks.  Apparently, I look exactly like one of their local 'Garda" who had recently been transferred to a post in the very far NW of Donegal county.
        I am unaware of the differences between the Irish gaelic and the Scottish gallic, and have encountered no connections with the name "Ui Brolchain" which you mention.  The local research group AFHS (Alberta Family History Society) may have either some bodies or some sources on that name and I will ask some of the 'heads' if they have any leads.  I believe that the AFHS recently had a talk/presentation/discussion on DNA matching, but I continue 'juggling' between health concerns (e.g., pending leg surgery to remove the metal inserted there 2 years ago, stem cell treatment of my spinal cord injuries, etc.) and the efforts I am permitted to make in family tree tracing, and am not always able to attend such talks/presentations/discussions.
      Thank you very much again for your generous reply.
      Brian
      P.S.  The 'Cc' of this msg is going to Ann Williams who is an active member of the aforementioned AFHS.


      On 22-Jun-10, at 3:57 AM, Dan Bradley wrote:

      Hi Brian

      I'm afraid I don't have much knowledge of my own tree - its rooted near Maghera Co Derry for quite a few generations. We had relatives in the 1800s who went to USA and Australia but I don't know of Canadian connections. I am sure you know about the problems with records in Irish Genealogy.  You have done well to get back to 1866.

      One thing I can mention. We have done some Y chromosome genetic research in my lab (although no longer as the student has left). We sampled quite a few Bradleys and found that they fell into three categories
      : NW Ireland Bradleys who had a typical "Niall" Y chromosome type (see attached paper)
      Cork Bradleys who had a typical Irish Y type but different to that of NW Bradleys
      Kilkenny Bradleys who had a more typical British Y type -which accords with local stories about origins.

      Not every Bradley Y chromosome fits into the central haplotypes (as with all names)

      NW Ireland Bradleys are most common and a most likely origin - gaelic name Ui Brolchain

      Best wishes

      Dan

      Dear Professor Bradley,
       Over the past 30 years, on a part-time basis, I have been trying to trace my family links in Ireland.  I was in Ireland temporarily in Jan. 1974 (Queens University, Belfast) and again in the summer of 1975 for a 2 week period (visiting Antrim, Donegal, Gallway Bay, Kerry, Cork and Dublin).  The remainder of that period (1974-1976) was spent in Glasgow, Scotland where I was completing research with MS patients.
        I am currently disabled as the result of spinal cord injuries at three levels, and am awaiting something called justice from the Canadian law courts (in claims that I have against Veterans Affairs).
       The only link I was able to establish was from my GGGrandfather's (Mark Bradley) obituary, who died in Cornwall, Stormont County, Ontario, Canada on Mar 6, 1866 after out-living all of his children on his farm (Mountain Township, Dundas Counrty, Ontario, Canada) and being buried by his grandson (my Grandfather) Ambrose Henry Bradley.
       I should greatly appreciate any links and / or suggestions that you might supply to help in my genealogical research and thank you very kindly for your time and efforts in this regard.
      Brian C. Bradley
      Braeside Community
      Calgary S.W., Alberta
      Canada
      <Moore et al 2006.pdf><McEvoy2006.pdf>--
      Professor Dan Bradley
      Smurfit Institute of Genetics
      Trinity College
      Dublin 2

      ph: 353 18961088
      fax: 353 16798558
      email: dbradley@...


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