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Immigrant Train Passengers

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  • Mabel Kiessling
    Hello fellow dist-gen members: Does anyone know if passenger lists exist for immigrants that took trains from the port of Montreal to their destinations,
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 17, 2009
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      Immigrant Train Passengers

      Hello fellow dist-gen members:

      Does anyone know if passenger lists exist for immigrants that took trains from the port of Montreal to their destinations, either in Canada or the U.S.?  Are Border Crossing Records the only way to know?

      Thanks for any help on this question.

      Mabel Kiessling

    • Rene Dussome
      Mabel: My daughter and I came by train from Montreal to Calgary in 1952 and we are on the ship s passenger list (Ascania) but I doubt if there was any list
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 17, 2009
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        Immigrant Train Passengers

        Mabel:

         

        My daughter and I came by train from Montreal to Calgary in 1952 and we are on the ship’s passenger list (Ascania) but I doubt if there was any list kept of people continuing on their journey by train. We were probably given a train ticket when we left the ship but I don’t remember.

         

        Rene Dussome

        Does anyone know if passenger lists exist for immigrants that took trains from the port of Montreal to their destinations, either in Canada or the U.S. ?  Are Border Crossing Records the only way to know?

        Thanks for any help on this question.

        Mabel Kiessling

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      • Charlie Hansen
        ... It depends on the years involved. On the Ancestry.ca listings of passenger lists shown under Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 the future wife of a
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 17, 2009
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          On 17 Nov 2009 Mabel Kiessling wrote:

          > Does anyone know if passenger lists exist for immigrants that took
          > trains from the port of Montreal to their destinations, either in
          > Canada or the U.S.? Are Border Crossing Records the only way to
          > know?

          It depends on the years involved. On the Ancestry.ca listings of passenger lists shown
          under "Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935" the future wife of a cousin is listed twice
          arriving in Halifax. In 1914, Ida Ward is listed with her destination as Calgary and there is
          a column "Travelled inland via" under which is listed "CPR". This column is not present
          when she returned with her mother and siblings to Calgary on 30 Sept 1919. For 1914 her
          entry is stamped "British Bonus Allowed " and her occupation as "Domestic". In 1919 she
          is listed as a "typist" and with a notation "to be married".

          I did a random check for some Montreal arrivals and sometimes "Travelled inland via" is
          on the passenger list form and sometimes not. It probably depends on the shipping line
          used. You will usually find a listing for "Destination in Canada'. If it is for Manitoba or
          further west, I think it is safe to assume train travel if it is after rail travel became
          available.

          Charlie Hansen
        • Xenia Stanford
          Hi Mabel, What you need is called “overland” passenger or traveller lists. Some trains in some periods did keep such records. Louis Rasmussen has published
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 20, 2009
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            Immigrant Train Passengers

            Hi Mabel,

             

            What you need is called “overland” passenger or traveller lists. Some trains in some periods did keep such records. Louis Rasmussen has published at least two volumes of such lists in his series “Railway passenger lists of overland trains to San Francisco and the West.” Another book is “Overland to California with the Pioneer Line,” although it is not comprised of lists but is a diary in which names and fates of some people are mentioned.

             

            I am not sure if overland travel in Canada was recorded that much, but certainly for cross-border travel the border crossing lists are the most common way to find travellers whether they travelled by train or other means. Certain conductors did keep lists but few of these lists survive. There is a book called “Overland route through British North America” by Waddington, published in 1868. I am not sure if it contains any names of travellers. Also you have not stated a timeframe for the travellers you have in mind.

             

            The destination certainly could have been purchased all at once if the person was coming from overseas and proceeding overland immediately upon arrival. These were usually called “inclusive through tickets.” In my grandparents’ effects, I found their “ticket” with the stub removed. The remaining ¾ page document states how they will get from Antwerp to Montreal and then how they will proceed from there. My grandmother said that those from steerage who were traveling inland by train were put overnight in a basement holding room until they were boarded on the train the following day. She said she knew it was “underground” because she could see through the windows at the top of the room (the only source of light) the shoes of passers-by on the street outside. In other words, the complete trip from Antwerp to Alberta was ticketed and paid for prior to their departure.

             

            Xenia

             

            From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...] On Behalf Of Mabel Kiessling
            Sent: November 17, 2009 8:34 AM
            To: dist-gen@...
            Subject: Immigrant Train Passengers

             

            Hello fellow dist-gen members:

            Does anyone know if passenger lists exist for immigrants that took trains from the port of Montreal to their destinations, either in Canada or the U.S.?  Are Border Crossing Records the only way to know?

            Thanks for any help on this question.

            Mabel Kiessling

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