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RE: French Source

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  • Xenia Stanford
    Hi Donna, There are seven books involved in the citation you give. They are the works of abbot Cyprien Tanguay. He took church records and compiled family
    Message 1 of 5 , May 4, 2004
      Hi Donna,

      There are seven books involved in the citation you give. They are the works
      of abbot Cyprien Tanguay. He took church records and compiled family groups
      arranged in order by surname of the male head of household. Each entry
      begins with the date and place (if known - otherwise he puts a year only) of
      first marriage of the HOH and gives whatever information he can find about
      the man. This can include the following where known: occupation, baptism
      (listed as b so don't take this as b for birth as the abbreviations are
      French, if known the birth date is listed as n for naissance), parents'
      name, parish and diocese of parents' residence at time of marriage or if
      deceased, their last known residence (many of these are emigrants from
      France and so this is useful in determining from what parish in France they
      originated and is a huge step toward finding records to go further back in
      time), sometimes whether parents were alive or deceased at the time of the
      HOH first marriage, s for sepulture date followed by place (sepulture is
      burial record - date recorded in parish record, which may or may not match
      date of death and may not accurately reflect date of burial - was usually
      date of funeral services or mass - when the body was actually inhumed could
      have been different - especially if winter and not sufficient graves had
      been dug when the ground was not frozen) and d for death if known (d for
      deces is same abbreviation as in English).

      Then the first spouse is listed with same type of information (if known) as
      for her husband.

      Then children are listed usually in order of date of baptism or birth. Also
      date and m à indicating "married to" followed by name of first spouse and if
      additional marriages/spouses for that person, they are indicated by number
      e.g. 1 m ..., 2 m... Burials are usually not recorded unless the child died
      young and unmarried. To find the date of burial and other information, you
      must find the couple listed by groom's surname. So if a son of the HOH
      married and if Tanguay included him, you will find the entry under the son's
      surname HOH entry. If a daughter married, you will find her under her
      husband's surname HOH entry.

      After all the children for the first marriage are listed, if there was a
      second spouse, another date and location will follow and the second wife's
      name will be listed and followed by any children of that marriage and so on.

      There are 7 books in the full set. The first is Volume I A-Z which takes
      families from 1608 to 1700 or as Tanguay subtitles it - from the foundation
      of the colony to our day (of course, he means his "day"). Volume II - VII
      restart the alphabet and overlaps the entries from the first volume in some
      cases. However, for the most part this is the continuation of the families
      from Volume I and also includes new families that arrived after 1700 or were
      otherwise missed in the first volume. These 6 volumes take the families of
      New France from about 1700 (earlier in some cases) to about 1763.

      Alphabetically they are as follows:
      Volume 2 : A -Cha
      Volume 3 : Charbonneau-Ezequiel
      Volume 4 : Fadas-Jinines,
      Volume 5 : Joachim-Mercier
      Volume 6 : Mercin-Robidou
      Volume 7 : Robillard-Ziseuse

      Volume 7 has the listings of all "dit" names (alternative names by which the
      person was known) and other aliases (page 505 to 601)

      When using Tanguay as a reference it is also necessary to check in
      "Corrections and Additions to the Dictionnaire Genealogiques des Familles
      Canadiennes by Reverend Cyprien Tanguay" that was compiled by Leboeuf et al.
      It is usually cited in short as "Leboeuf's corrections" or "Leboeuf's
      supplement" or simply "Leboeuf's". Leboeuf is J.-Arthur Leboeuf, a member of
      the SGCF (Societe Genealogique Canadienne-Francaise - I have typed it here
      without the accents) and the et al are other members of that society.

      The original 7 volumes are now available in several forms. Print, microfilm,
      CD and scanned images available for download from the Bibliothèque Nationale
      du Québec (National Library of Quebec). I have all in print as I purchased
      in the days before it was available on CD or downloaded images.

      If your friend wants to download and has fast speed Internet or adsl access
      with 513 Mb of free space for the file, she can go to the following page:
      http://www.rootsweb.com/~canqc/tanguay.htm and follow the instructions. The
      files are in pdf and are scanned images.

      Most of the text can be deciphered from following my explanation of the
      sections and the abbreviations I gave above. However, occasionally there are
      further details on occupations, method of death (if it was unusual) and also
      footnotes with explanations of source or other distinquishing information on
      a person or family. Since the complete text is in French and older French at
      that, if your friend needs translation of any passage, you can refer her to
      me.

      Some of the occupational terminology is now obsolete or has changed meaning
      since that time. So I am writing a book on the occupations to explain what
      the terms actually meant during the 15th to 19th centuries. For example,
      "pilote" then did not mean "pilot" as in one who flies planes but the
      "pilot" of a boat - especially one who guided it in and around the harbours.

      Many sources misinterpret the older meanings, for example "arquebusier" is
      often translated as gunsmith instead of its real meaning of a soldier
      (gunner) who shot with an arquebusque (old type of musket). Armurier was the
      term usually applied during this period for one who made or supplied arms -
      thus can be translated as gunsmith but never have I found arquebusier
      actually used in a passage where it could mean gunsmith. So be very aware of
      the source of the interpretation and whether the person is a modern
      reader/speaker of French or whether the person is a linguist and historian
      or a student of Old French and history.

      I am writing a book on old French occupations. I was asked to do so since I
      am a linguist by education as well as a historian by passion! However, as
      you can imagine it is slow work because for terms with which I am not
      familiar, I do not take modern definitions so must either find it in an
      ancient (pre-1900s) French dictionary and hope I can translate the rest of
      the text or must find it in context in a passage and determine its meaning
      from its use. Sometimes I am lucky and it has a common latin root with or
      was the source of an old English word. Then my old English and etymological
      dictionaries come in handy.

      So if I can help her, let me know.

      à bientôt,

      Xenia Stanford (president@...)
      A.G.E. Ancestree Genealogical Enterprises
      Column: "Nos Racines Francaise" http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette
      Local book and magazine sales: http://www.knowmap.com/age/
      Celtic Stone Art: http://www/celticstoneart.com
      Phone: (403) 295-3490; Fax: (403) 274-0564



      -----Original Message-----
      From: owner-dist-gen@...
      [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Donna Snyder
      Sent: May 3, 2004 1:36 PM
      To: dist-gen@...
      Subject: French Source


      Hi List;
      A friend in Wyoming, USA has found the following as a source in her work.
      She wants to know who it pertains to, where it was published and if
      possible where to get a copy. Can someone on the list help?
      Thanks,
      Donna Snyder

      Dictionnaire Genealogique des Famillies
      Canandiennes by Cyprien Tanguay.


      http://www.afhs.ab.ca

      http://www.afhs.ab.ca
    • Donna Snyder
      Thanks to all who replied. I have forwarded the replies to my friend and I m sure you covered everything she could think to ask. This list is such a resource
      Message 2 of 5 , May 4, 2004
        Thanks to all who replied. I have forwarded the replies to my friend and I'm
        sure you covered everything she could think to ask. This list is such a
        resource in itself. Thanks again,
        Donna Snyder


        http://www.afhs.ab.ca
      • Leslie
        Hi Donna, It is online at http://www.bnquebec.ca/numtxt/tanguay.htm Leslie ... From: Donna Snyder To: Sent:
        Message 3 of 5 , May 8, 2004
          Hi Donna,

          It is online at http://www.bnquebec.ca/numtxt/tanguay.htm

          Leslie

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Donna Snyder" <snyderda@...>
          To: <dist-gen@...>
          Sent: Monday, May 03, 2004 12:35 PM
          Subject: French Source


          > Hi List;
          > A friend in Wyoming, USA has found the following as a source in her work.
          > She wants to know who it pertains to, where it was published and if
          > possible where to get a copy. Can someone on the list help?
          > Thanks,
          > Donna Snyder
          >
          > Dictionnaire Genealogique des Famillies
          > Canandiennes by Cyprien Tanguay.
          >
          >
          > http://www.afhs.ab.ca
          http://www.afhs.ab.ca
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