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Re: Ontario Divorce Records

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  • Robert Boynton
    Joanne It was very common in those days that when a wife dies, the children are not left with the father but families of relatives where a mother exists. Could
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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      Joanne
       
      It was very common in those days that when a wife dies, the children are not left with the father but families of relatives where a mother exists.
       
      Could you possibly have assumed there was a divorce when in fact she may have died?
       
      Rob
      Calgary 
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
      Subject: Ontario Divorce Records

      Hello,
       
      Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
       
      I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
       
      Any ideas???
       
      Joanne
    • Donna Coulter
      There has been a book published on divorces in Ontario. The OGS will have the author and repository. Perhaps a letter to the Rootsweb Ontario will get you a
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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        There has been a book published on divorces in Ontario.  The OGS will have the author and repository. Perhaps a letter to the Rootsweb Ontario will get you a volunteer response.
         
        Check the Owl Nest Bookstore (Where we will be having our library soon)-- He has a tremendous collection of reference books.
         
        Donna Coulter
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: 20 July, 2003 12:51 PM
        Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records

        Joanne
         
        It was very common in those days that when a wife dies, the children are not left with the father but families of relatives where a mother exists.
         
        Could you possibly have assumed there was a divorce when in fact she may have died?
         
        Rob
        Calgary 
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
        Subject: Ontario Divorce Records

        Hello,
         
        Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
         
        I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
         
        Any ideas???
         
        Joanne
      • william campbell
        Hi Folks: Donna Coulter refers to the Owl Nest Book shop. She intended that to be the Owl s Rook Books, I m sure. However, the Owl s Rook no longer exists. The
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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          Hi Folks:

          Donna Coulter refers to the Owl Nest Book shop. She intended that to be the Owl's Rook Books, I'm sure.

          However, the Owl's Rook no longer exists. The book store where our new library will be located is on the lower level at   THE GENEALOGY BUREAU - 712-16th Avenue NW in Calgary.

          Cheers

          Bill

          Donna Coulter wrote:

          There has been a book published on divorces in Ontario.  The OGS will have the author and repository. Perhaps a letter to the Rootsweb Ontario will get you a volunteer response. Check the Owl Nest Bookstore (Where we will be having our library soon)-- He has a tremendous collection of reference books. Donna Coulter  ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: 20 July, 2003 12:51 PM
          Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records
           Joanne It was very common in those days that when a wife dies, the children are not left with the father but families of relatives where a mother exists. Could you possibly have assumed there was a divorce when in fact she may have died? RobCalgary
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
          Subject: Ontario Divorce Records
           Hello, Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario? I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children. Any ideas??? Joanne

          --
          William A. Campbell
          Calgary, Alberta, Canada
           

        • Donna Coulter
          Right on Bill-- Hi-- sure didn t intend everyone to immediately rush off to the rook (crow like) or think that they would be rooked (cheated). The store has
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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            Right on Bill--
             
            Hi-- sure didn't intend everyone to immediately rush off to the "rook (crow like)" or think that they would be rooked (cheated).
             
            The store has been dubbed "nest" by many. (tongue in cheek) The name Owls Rook is still on the building.
             
            The web site is  www.genealogybureau.com
            Perhaps you had better phone first-- he isn't quite settled in.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: 20 July, 2003 3:51 PM
            Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records

            Hi Folks:

            Donna Coulter refers to the Owl Nest Book shop. She intended that to be the Owl's Rook Books, I'm sure.

            However, the Owl's Rook no longer exists. The book store where our new library will be located is on the lower level at   THE GENEALOGY BUREAU - 712-16th Avenue NW in Calgary.

            Cheers

            Bill

            Donna Coulter wrote:

            There has been a book published on divorces in Ontario.  The OGS will have the author and repository. Perhaps a letter to the Rootsweb Ontario will get you a volunteer response. Check the Owl Nest Bookstore (Where we will be having our library soon)-- He has a tremendous collection of reference books. Donna Coulter  ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: 20 July, 2003 12:51 PM
            Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records
             Joanne It was very common in those days that when a wife dies, the children are not left with the father but families of relatives where a mother exists. Could you possibly have assumed there was a divorce when in fact she may have died? RobCalgary
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
            Subject: Ontario Divorce Records
             Hello, Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario? I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children. Any ideas??? Joanne

            --
            William A. Campbell
            Calgary, Alberta, Canada
             

          • Frank Morrow
            Glad to see that Bill didn t destroy your sense of humour! It s quite true that the AFHS Library will be nesting there for some time! Cheers.
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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              Glad to see that Bill didn't destroy your sense of humour! It's quite true that the AFHS Library will be 'nesting' there for some time!
              Cheers.
            • Ronna L. Byam
              Brenda Dougall Merriman gives an in-depth discussion of Ontario divorce records in her book Genealogy in Ontario: Searching the Records (3rd edition), pages
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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                Brenda Dougall Merriman gives an in-depth discussion of Ontario divorce records in her book Genealogy in Ontario: Searching the Records (3rd edition), pages 40-42.  This book is available at both the Calgary Public Library and the Calgary Family History Centre.
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
                Subject: Ontario Divorce Records

                Hello,
                 
                Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
                 
                I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
                 
                Any ideas???
                 
                Joanne
              • Xenia Stanford
                See http://www.archives.ca/02/020202/0202020207_e.html Divorce in Canada prior to the 1960s was handled through a private act of the Parliament of Canada.
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 20, 2003
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                  Divorce in Canada prior to the 1960s was handled through a private act of the Parliament of Canada. During the latter part of the 19th century, a person wishing to obtain a divorce was first required to place a notice of intent to petition the government for an Act of Divorce, for a period of six months, in The Canada Gazette and two newspapers in the district or county in which the petitioner resided. Information given in this notice would include the names of both parties, their place(s) of residence and the grounds under which the divorce was being sought. The actual petition would contain more details, including the date and place of the marriage, and events surrounding the demise of the marriage. In the event of adultery or bigamy, a co-respondent was often named. If, after consideration, the petition was allowed, Parliament would pass an Act of Divorce, nullifying the marriage. A transcript of the Act was published in the Statutes of Canada for the current year. The Canada Gazette and the Statutes of Canada are available at the National Library of Canada.
                   
                  Fast and easy if you know the year. There is supposed to be an online search but it came up page not available when I just tried it. So maybe it will work later. Ontario divorce petitions were included in the The Canada Gazette Part I from 1867 to 1930. You should be able to find out through the online search or looking through the indexed to Part I at the U of C Law Library.
                   
                  You can then obtain the petition from the National Archives. If you wish to find further dirt, you can go to the municipality in which they were divorced to obtain further information. These records are public and reporters use them all the time to expose scandals of secrets involving famous people. These are available in the U.S. but I did not find it that way first. Since I knew the U.S. city in which the great granduncle was a coach, I thought I would scan the newspapers for any information on his wife and children since I could not find a marriage record and his wife's name was not known. Little did either my client or I expect what I found. I thought I might find something in the social pages! However, I found it in the news section and the sports' pages - I guess those are the anti-social pages! :-)
                   
                  For Canada, the newspapers in the area should not be overlooked for these notices either. If she died as someone suggested, then perhaps you may find an obituary instead of a divorce. If he did not remarry, then perhaps they simply separated. Newspapers should not be overlooked and right now I am reviewing all the records I can for another client because I found the U.S. marriage record but the bride's parents are simply listed as John and Mary (no maiden name for the bride's mother). The couple were French and since the French Catholics named every girl Marie and half the boys Jean or Jean-Baptiste (the other half Joseph) for their grace name and then gave them a name by which they were commonly known, this is like looking for a specific needle in a haystack with more needles than hay. So I have to be creative and hope there is something in the newspaper about the marriage or something else. After all you never know what you might find!
                   
                  Back to the Gazettes - besides divorce petitions Part I of the Gazette covered other notices such as naturalizations and name changes. These are very valuable records for genealogists. In addition to the federal government all provinces have their own versions of the Gazette as this is the official government record. Part II & III cover acts & regulations respectively but Part I covers notices - most boring and irrelevant but often with lots of treasures. 
                   
                  I gave a brief talk on this at the AFHS one year (as part of a panel on various topics) but I guess it is too many years ago to remember! However, there is a treasure trove of information in these records.
                   
                   à bientôt,

                  Xenia Stanford (president@...)
                  A.G.E. Ancestree Genealogical Enterprises
                  Column: "Nos Racines Francaise" http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette
                  Local book and magazine sales: http://www.knowmap.com/age/
                  Phone: (403) 295-3490; Fax: (403) 274-0564

                   
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Ronna L. Byam
                  Sent: July 20, 2003 6:45 PM
                  To: dist-gen@...; Joanne Elford
                  Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records

                  Brenda Dougall Merriman gives an in-depth discussion of Ontario divorce records in her book Genealogy in Ontario: Searching the Records (3rd edition), pages 40-42.  This book is available at both the Calgary Public Library and the Calgary Family History Centre.
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
                  Subject: Ontario Divorce Records

                  Hello,
                   
                  Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
                   
                  I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
                   
                  Any ideas???
                   
                  Joanne
                • Xenia Stanford
                  One further note I forgot to mention. The full petition will also most often give the following additional facts: the dates and places of birth of both
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 21, 2003
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                    One further note I forgot to mention. The full petition will also most often give the following additional facts: the dates and places of birth of both parties, the wife's maiden name, the date and place of the marriage and the occupation(s) of the parties. In the case of the wife, this may not be noted in which case it is assumed she is a housewife.
                     
                    (Aside: I just found some French documents in which even recently they use the term "femme au foyer" (translates to "woman of hearth") which I think has better connotations than housewife - i.e. married to a house - though homemaker is a good English version.)
                     
                    Also often included in the full divorce papers (those in the file with the petition but if you ask for only the petition you may not receive these - ask for a copy of the complete file - sometimes you will not receive it even then due to extra work but if you go in person you can usually ask for and review the full file and then make copies) are the property settlements, who will be responsible for what regarding the children and so on.
                     
                    When you cannot find the original marriage information, but there is a divorce record, you can find the information you need through that means!
                     
                    Canada should learn from France. They have what they call a "life record" in which they file everything about the person (birth date/place, all marriages/divorces and death) in one place - usually located in the archives of the person's place of birth. You can obtain it for people who were born over 100 years ago as long as they are now deceased or, if you are next of kin, for a person who was born less than 100 years ago who are now deceased.
                     
                    The cost for this is merely the international reply coupon. If you go there in person, it is free!
                     
                    I am not sure what the current costs are for the record you seek though because I haven't obtained one through the National Library for awhile. The last one I obtained was about 6 years ago. I believe I paid less than $10. The librarian I dealt with when the extra miles though and dug up some additional information that I did not know existed. She threw that in for free. She also found a photograph of one ancestor from taken circa 1920 and sent a copy of the photo but offered to have it reproduced on photographic paper for $10. I took her up on the offer and received the 8 by 10 photograph about two weeks later.
                     
                    Another place to look is sanitorium records as often the woman dropped out of sight and the children went into the care of relatives because she was sent to a mental sanitorium or one for TB. She may have been in there long-term and sometimes even died there. Of course, men could have these problems too but it seems more women were "sent away" during the late 1800s and early 1900s.
                    Anyway just another place to look. P.S. Census records can help you locate people in these sanitoriums if they were in one during the census-taking.
                     
                    Bonne chance!
                     
                    Xenia
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Xenia Stanford
                    Sent: July 20, 2003 9:06 PM
                    To: dist-gen@...; Ronna L. Byam; Joanne Elford
                    Subject: RE: Ontario Divorce Records

                     
                    Divorce in Canada prior to the 1960s was handled through a private act of the Parliament of Canada. During the latter part of the 19th century, a person wishing to obtain a divorce was first required to place a notice of intent to petition the government for an Act of Divorce, for a period of six months, in The Canada Gazette and two newspapers in the district or county in which the petitioner resided. Information given in this notice would include the names of both parties, their place(s) of residence and the grounds under which the divorce was being sought. The actual petition would contain more details, including the date and place of the marriage, and events surrounding the demise of the marriage. In the event of adultery or bigamy, a co-respondent was often named. If, after consideration, the petition was allowed, Parliament would pass an Act of Divorce, nullifying the marriage. A transcript of the Act was published in the Statutes of Canada for the current year. The Canada Gazette and the Statutes of Canada are available at the National Library of Canada.
                     
                    Fast and easy if you know the year. There is supposed to be an online search but it came up page not available when I just tried it. So maybe it will work later. Ontario divorce petitions were included in the The Canada Gazette Part I from 1867 to 1930. You should be able to find out through the online search or looking through the indexed to Part I at the U of C Law Library.
                     
                    You can then obtain the petition from the National Archives. If you wish to find further dirt, you can go to the municipality in which they were divorced to obtain further information. These records are public and reporters use them all the time to expose scandals of secrets involving famous people. These are available in the U.S. but I did not find it that way first. Since I knew the U.S. city in which the great granduncle was a coach, I thought I would scan the newspapers for any information on his wife and children since I could not find a marriage record and his wife's name was not known. Little did either my client or I expect what I found. I thought I might find something in the social pages! However, I found it in the news section and the sports' pages - I guess those are the anti-social pages! :-)
                     
                    For Canada, the newspapers in the area should not be overlooked for these notices either. If she died as someone suggested, then perhaps you may find an obituary instead of a divorce. If he did not remarry, then perhaps they simply separated. Newspapers should not be overlooked and right now I am reviewing all the records I can for another client because I found the U.S. marriage record but the bride's parents are simply listed as John and Mary (no maiden name for the bride's mother). The couple were French and since the French Catholics named every girl Marie and half the boys Jean or Jean-Baptiste (the other half Joseph) for their grace name and then gave them a name by which they were commonly known, this is like looking for a specific needle in a haystack with more needles than hay. So I have to be creative and hope there is something in the newspaper about the marriage or something else. After all you never know what you might find!
                     
                    Back to the Gazettes - besides divorce petitions Part I of the Gazette covered other notices such as naturalizations and name changes. These are very valuable records for genealogists. In addition to the federal government all provinces have their own versions of the Gazette as this is the official government record. Part II & III cover acts & regulations respectively but Part I covers notices - most boring and irrelevant but often with lots of treasures. 
                     
                    I gave a brief talk on this at the AFHS one year (as part of a panel on various topics) but I guess it is too many years ago to remember! However, there is a treasure trove of information in these records.
                     
                     à bientôt,

                    Xenia Stanford (president@...)
                    A.G.E. Ancestree Genealogical Enterprises
                    Column: "Nos Racines Francaise" http://globalgenealogy.com/globalgazette
                    Local book and magazine sales: http://www.knowmap.com/age/
                    Phone: (403) 295-3490; Fax: (403) 274-0564

                     
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Ronna L. Byam
                    Sent: July 20, 2003 6:45 PM
                    To: dist-gen@...; Joanne Elford
                    Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records

                    Brenda Dougall Merriman gives an in-depth discussion of Ontario divorce records in her book Genealogy in Ontario: Searching the Records (3rd edition), pages 40-42.  This book is available at both the Calgary Public Library and the Calgary Family History Centre.
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 12:06 PM
                    Subject: Ontario Divorce Records

                    Hello,
                     
                    Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
                     
                    I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
                     
                    Any ideas???
                     
                    Joanne
                  • Lois Sparling
                    Divorce was very rare in Canada in those days. Ontario divorces were handled as Private Members Bills in the House of Commons. You can check them at the law
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 21, 2003
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                      Divorce was very rare in Canada in those days.  Ontario divorces were handled as Private Members' Bills in the House of Commons.  You can check them at the law library in the Court House downtown.  The reference librarians can show you where the Private Acts are in the Statutes of Canada, year by year.  As I recall they are close to the windows on the east side of the library in the row of books facing the south side of the area with  tables.  They are in beige volumes entitled "Statutes of Canada" and the year(s).

                      Lois Sparling

                      Joanne Elford wrote:
                      Hello,
                       
                      Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
                       
                      I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
                       
                      Any ideas???
                       
                      Joanne

                    • Joanne Elford
                      Thanks for your help! I ll give it a try. ... From: Lois Sparling To: dist-gen@www.afhs.ab.ca ; Joanne Elford Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2003 12:57 AM Subject:
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 22, 2003
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                        Thanks for your help! I'll give it a try.
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2003 12:57 AM
                        Subject: Re: Ontario Divorce Records

                        Divorce was very rare in Canada in those days.  Ontario divorces were handled as Private Members' Bills in the House of Commons.  You can check them at the law library in the Court House downtown.  The reference librarians can show you where the Private Acts are in the Statutes of Canada, year by year.  As I recall they are close to the windows on the east side of the library in the row of books facing the south side of the area with  tables.  They are in beige volumes entitled "Statutes of Canada" and the year(s).

                        Lois Sparling

                        Joanne Elford wrote:
                        Hello,
                         
                        Does anybody know how to get divorce records from Ontario?
                         
                        I'm looking for my g-g-grandmother. She is listed with her husband and three children in the 1891 census in Tilbury, Ontario. The 1901 census shows her husband and children living with other family members, but I can't find her. I believe they divorced sometime around 1893. She must of remarried or moved because nobody ever heard from her again. Not even her children.
                         
                        Any ideas???
                         
                        Joanne

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