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RE: Anyone heard of St-François-Bacedu, Felure P.L.?

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  • Xenia Stanford
    Thanks Vicki, I hadn t thought of that. Even though she is listed on the 1901 census as born in Quebec, there has to be some reason she came to Manitoba as a
    Message 1 of 4 , May 17, 2003
      Thanks Vicki,
       
      I hadn't thought of that. Even though she is listed on the 1901 census as born in Quebec, there has to be some reason she came to Manitoba as a widow to have her last child. She was married and living in Rhode Island with her husband and two children when her husband, a railway worker, was killed in a railroad accident. The family has been mystified by why she came all the way from Rhode Island with two small children and another on the way. It does not appear that she lived with her soon-to-be-next husband as her child was born in a difference district from where her husband's family were living. Since the two years between the time she arrived, had the child and remarried are between censuses, I am trying to find some other relatives she may have had there. I do have a possible family that could be a brother and sister-in-law and your suggestion could mean that this is where the family originated before she and her first husband went off to the US.
       
      My client remembers his grandmother, who died at age 91, but at the time he was not interested in family history! Isn't that the case with so many of us? Anyway he has bits and pieces of information from oral family history about her and a few documents but although another genealogist and I have been able to trace his grandfather's line back to Acadia and then France, I am still working on finding his grandmother's back to anything! We have the marriage certificate for the marriage in Manitoba, which lists her as a widow and her previous husband's name. I have also been able to find her first marriage in Warwick, Kent, Rhode Island where it lists her parents' names but so far I have not been able to find her parents records. I was hoping the birthplace of St-François-Bacedu, Felure P.L. might give me a clue for that. She had a maiden name that is spelled so many different ways that without knowing where she was born and finding that record, it will be difficult to trace her ancestry any further back.
       
      Anyway in the 1901 census I have another mystery because just rechecking it before I sent this reply I see that following the Quebec is an N.
       
      So now I have another mystery. On the entire page I printed from the 1901 census has birthplaces for people in Canada with an N as follows: Man. N. Ont. N. or Que. N. Those born in the USA do not seem to have this N. Does it mean they are natural Canadians, naturalized or native as in aboriginal? (The 1881 census record lists both families as white). The N is a few spaces away from the province but still in the same column.
       
      I will look for the answer myself but if anyone knows already, that could be a help to us all.
       
      Xenia
      -----Original Message-----
      From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Ri & Vicki Morgan
      Sent: May 17, 2003 12:56 PM
      To: dist-gen@...; Xenia Stanford
      Subject: Re: Anyone heard of St-François-Bacedu, Felure P.L.?

      Re the P.L. - just another thought:
       
      Someone here has suggested that P. L. in Manitoba at least, could have meant Parish Lot, which is a designation of a deeded property, dating from some time around the original provincial survey.  "Parish" doesn't necessarily mean a religious property, but rather defines a long narrow strip of land from a road access towards a river, creek, or body of water - e.g. in the recent past, Rural Municipalities of Headingly and St. Francois Xavier in Manitoba, both west of Winnipeg.  
       
      Vicki Morgan.
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, May 16, 2003 11:05 AM
      Subject: RE: Anyone heard of St-François-Bacedu, Felure P.L.?

      Thanks Peter. The family were definitely French from North America. It is the birth place that is shown as Felure so I don't think it would be Fellure Cemetery but I will check out Ohio to see if there is a church of that name.
       
      Hmm never thought of Poland but I think that is a long shot.
       
      Thanks for the suggestions.
       
      Xenia
      -----Original Message-----
      From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Peter van Schaik
      Sent: May 16, 2003 9:34 AM
      To: dist-gen@...
      Subject: RE: Anyone heard of St-François-Bacedu, Felure P.L.?

      At 08:46 AM 5/16/03, you wrote:
      Thanks for the suggestion Vicki. I had thought of that but there is still no St-François-Bacedu and/or Felure in Quebec that I can find in current or old maps.

      Just some ideas.........

      There is a Fellure Cemetery in Ohio. In Gallia County, just north of the Wayne forest reserve.

      What if P.L. stands for Poland, and you translate the names to Polish?


      I had also thought what if it is P.E.I. but that it doesn't look like that
      is what it is.
      Felure means crack or flaw in French and it is possible it should be
      St-François-Baie-du-Felure. There is a St-François-Xavier de Baie-St-Paul
      and a Baie St-François but it doesn't look like that is what it is but if
      all else fails I will start looking for the people there.

      My other choice Baie-du-Febvre but there is no St-François church there. The parish church is St-Antoine-de-Padoue but it doesn't look like that is what is written!
      Merci et à bientôt, Xenia

      Peter......

             35 years experience in
      USA, Canada, Great Britain, Nederland and Belgium research             
      Docs4u Genealogical research     docs4u@...
      http://petervanschaik.consulteert.com

    • Frank Morrow
      Hi Xenia, under the French legal system a deceased owner s land is divided among heirs. This practise was followed in French speaking pockets, eg St. Albert,
      Message 2 of 4 , May 17, 2003
        Hi Xenia, under the French legal system a deceased owner's land is divided among heirs. This practise was followed in French speaking pockets, eg St. Albert, St. Boniface, etc. This resulted in narrow strips of land inherited in some areas, so some addresses refer to miniscule parcels, such as in St. Albert, AB. Most of these thin strips of land run down to a creek or river.
        What am I telling you all this for..........you are probably more aware of it than I!
        Cheers.
      • Xenia Stanford
        Thanks Frank. I did know this for elsewhere but it had not dawned on me re Manitoba. I forgot I guess because I did learn much of the Manitoba-Red River
        Message 3 of 4 , May 17, 2003
          Thanks Frank. I did know this for elsewhere but it had not dawned on me re Manitoba. I forgot I guess because I did learn much of the Manitoba-Red River settlement genealogy and history from Gail Morin! I totally forgot about the riverlots in Manitoba. Thanks to you and Vicki for reminding me.
           
          Xenia
          -----Original Message-----
          From: owner-dist-gen@... [mailto:owner-dist-gen@...]On Behalf Of Frank Morrow
          Sent: May 17, 2003 2:48 PM
          To: dist-gen@...; Xenia Stanford
          Subject: Re: Anyone heard of St-François-Bacedu, Felure P.L.?

          Hi Xenia, under the French legal system a deceased owner's land is divided among heirs. This practise was followed in French speaking pockets, eg St. Albert, St. Boniface, etc. This resulted in narrow strips of land inherited in some areas, so some addresses refer to miniscule parcels, such as in St. Albert, AB. Most of these thin strips of land run down to a creek or river.
          What am I telling you all this for..........you are probably more aware of it than I!
          Cheers.
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