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N.Y.: CARRIAGE HORSES to REMAIN in SLAVERY!!! Action needed!

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  • Rita Fazio
    ... From: Adela/Total Animal Liberation! Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2003 1:02 PM Subject: Fw: CARRIAGE HORSES to REMAIN in SLAVERY!!!
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 30 10:24 PM
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Adela/Total Animal Liberation!
      Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2003 1:02 PM
      Subject: Fw: CARRIAGE HORSES to REMAIN in SLAVERY!!!

      <<The city has stepped in to help the drivers with approximately $722,000 in tax and real estate incentives...>>
      [Oh WOW! Are WE going to allow them to take OUR hard earned money...to keep horse slavery alive??? I hope we'll all email the paper to educate its readers. My sincere thanks in advance! Adela

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Destino136 @ aol.com (remove spaces)
      Penzelda @ aol.com (remove spaces)


      Pls. Post & Cross-Post!

      Zelda,

      The following article from the NY Daily News yesterday sickened me. The happy chirpy tone of it -- saying how the horse carriages are a wonderful New York tradition, and how if they didn't get the stable, their would be no more carriage rides in NYC, and "wouldn't that be awful." It made me sick. Those poor horses dragging overweight tourists around the streets, while taxicabs swarm
      > around them. If the stupid mayor wants to ban something, it should be those carriage rides. Anyone who is against the carriage rides, can write to:
      voicers @ edit.nydailynews.com (remove spaces) Be sure to give name, address and phone #.
      Here is the story...

      IN STABLE CONDITION

      By BEAGAN WILCOX
      DAILY NEWS WRITER

      Conor McHugh and Goldfinger do business on Central Park South. McHugh leads group of drivers who bought new digs for horses.

      A posse of Central Park carriage drivers cut to the chase when their horses were threatened with homelessness - and bought their own stable.
      Well, actually, a warehouse on W. 52nd St., but the building will be converted to house the horses.

      "My horse can afford to live in Manhattan, but I can't," joked Conor McHugh, 39, who has been driving a carriage in Central Park for 16 years.

      Last December, the drivers learned that their horses would be evicted from the city-owned Shamrock Stables on W. 45th St. and a privately owned facility on W. 52nd St.

      McHugh and 14 other carriage operators formed Park View Realty Associates, a limited liability corporation, and feverishly started searching for new digs.

      Many evenings after work, McHugh roamed the West Side streets near Central Park, where he searched for suitable quarters for at least 30 horses. When he told his mother of his quest, McHugh said, she replied, "Well, Jesus Christ
      knows the value of a stable, so he won't leave you without one."

      Nevertheless, McHugh feared the end of carriage rides in New York City.

      "I certainly didn't want it to happen on my watch," McHugh said last week while waiting with his horse, Goldfinger, for customers on Central Park South. Like the Yankees, he said, carriage rides are part of the fabric of this city.

      Finally, a real estate broker found the 30,000 square-foot property at 612-618 W. 52nd St. The drivers got a $3.34 million loan from Business Loan Express and bought the warehouse for $4 million. The chief executive officer of Business Loan Express, Robert Tannenhauser, said it took a lot of patience to hammer out the details of the 30-year loan, but that it was worth it to keep "a New
      York institution" running.

      The city has stepped in to help the drivers with approximately $722,000 in tax and real estate incentives provided through the Industrial Development Agency, according to Janel Patterson, a spokeswoman for the agency. The funds will aid in the renovation of the building, which McHugh estimated will cost between $250,000 and $300,000.

      About 30 horses are scheduled to move to their new stomping grounds in October or November. For now, they still sleep in Shamrock Stables.

      Stalls for about 50 horses will be built initially. Eventually, the stable will be able to shelter 70 horses.

      McHugh told the Daily News he will not turn away any homeless horses from the new Clinton Park Stables, named for nearby DeWitt Clinton Park.

      "Everybody's welcome," McHugh said happily.

      Originally published on August 27, 2003

      Jessica


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