Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

History of buildings for disabled ?

Expand Messages
  • piglet96
    This is maybe a bit obscure, but I hope someone can help. I am an architectural historian writing a book on Bristol (UK) buildings. There is a place in the
    Message 1 of 3 , May 30, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      This is maybe a bit obscure, but I hope someone can help. I am an
      architectural historian writing a book on Bristol (UK) buildings.
      There is a place in the city called Guild Heritage built in 1912-13
      by a private charity for disabled adults and children, particularly
      people who used wheelchairs or had restricted mobility. I have read
      that it is among (or is) the first such purpose designed building in
      the world but I somehow doubt that.

      If anyone knows when such buildings first came into being, or of
      books/research that would tell me more, please get in touch. I have
      seen the original plans for this building so for anyone interested I
      can give you more about the facilities provided. I know there was a
      hall and billiards room with table adapted for wheelchair use.

      The series is Pevsner Architectural Guides, published by Yale
      University Press.

      best regards, Andy Foyle
      andyf542@...
    • J.M.Parry
      Hi Andy - a very interesting question and topic! Sorry I can t help really but I would be interested in any replies you have - I am just finishing my PhD
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Andy -
        a very interesting question and topic! Sorry I can't help really but I would
        be interested in any replies you have - I am just finishing my PhD about
        disability in prison, and prison architecture is by default designed to
        provide 'barriers'. There was a prison in the late 1800's in Woking built to
        hold 'invalids' but closed again after about 20 or so years (Woking Invalid
        Convict Prison). I would be really interested to know more about when design
        for accessibility was first introduced into architectural thinking and
        planning. Could you please save my address and forward any replies that you
        feel would be appropriate, and I will look forward to seeing your book! Any
        reading you could point me to in this area would be greatly appreciated -
        all best wishes
        Jenny Parry



        Quoting piglet96 <andyf542@...>:

        > This is maybe a bit obscure, but I hope someone can help. I am an
        > architectural historian writing a book on Bristol (UK) buildings.
        > There is a place in the city called Guild Heritage built in 1912-13
        > by a private charity for disabled adults and children, particularly
        > people who used wheelchairs or had restricted mobility. I have read
        > that it is among (or is) the first such purpose designed building in
        > the world but I somehow doubt that.
        >
        > If anyone knows when such buildings first came into being, or of
        > books/research that would tell me more, please get in touch. I have
        > seen the original plans for this building so for anyone interested I
        > can give you more about the facilities provided. I know there was a
        > hall and billiards room with table adapted for wheelchair use.
        >
        > The series is Pevsner Architectural Guides, published by Yale
        > University Press.
        >
        > best regards, Andy Foyle
        > andyf542@...
        >
        >
        >
        > To Subscribe, please send a blank message to:
        > disabilitystudies-subscribe@...
        >
        > To Unsubscribe, please send a blank message to:
        > disabilitystudies-unsubscribe@...
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: disabilitystudies@...
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >




        --
        This mail sent through http://webmail.bangor.ac.uk
      • piglet96
        Jenny Thanks for the reply, yes I will certainly keep you posted on any progress. Talking to other authors on the series (Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds,
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 2, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Jenny

          Thanks for the reply, yes I will certainly keep you posted on any
          progress. Talking to other authors on the series (Liverpool,
          Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Birmingham) we could all cite
          Institutions built in the early 19th century for deaf dumb and blind
          people. Actually I noticed that this charity was actually aimed at
          blind people as well as those with what I called 'movement
          disabilities' (is that the right phrase?). But no one had examples of
          buildings designed for such disabilities until well into the 20th c.

          Your mention of the use of the word invalids reminds me of another
          angle on this - the original name of the charity was "The Guild of
          the Brave Poor Things", and its stated aim was (Im quoting here) "to
          help blind and crippled people, old or young, to make a brave and
          plucky fight". I wonder how far the provision of special faciltities
          was connected with casting people as 'brave' - i.e. if they werent
          brave they weren't deserving. It looks as if this title was too much
          even for that time - they soon discarded it for The Guild of the
          Handicapped and then Guild Heritage by 1936.

          Any other comments on this lot gratefully received! I'm sure someone
          must have done research in this area.
          all the best, Andy

          --- In disabilitystudies@yahoogroups.com, "J.M.Parry"
          <jenny.parry@b...> wrote:
          > Hi Andy -
          > a very interesting question and topic! Sorry I can't help really
          but I would
          > be interested in any replies you have - I am just finishing my PhD
          about
          > disability in prison, and prison architecture is by default
          designed to
          > provide 'barriers'. There was a prison in the late 1800's in
          Woking built to
          > hold 'invalids' but closed again after about 20 or so years (Woking
          Invalid
          > Convict Prison). I would be really interested to know more about
          when design
          > for accessibility was first introduced into architectural thinking
          and
          > planning. Could you please save my address and forward any replies
          that you
          > feel would be appropriate, and I will look forward to seeing your
          book! Any
          > reading you could point me to in this area would be greatly
          appreciated -
          > all best wishes
          > Jenny Parry
          >
          >
          >
          > Quoting piglet96 <andyf542@a...>:
          >
          > > This is maybe a bit obscure, but I hope someone can help. I am an
          > > architectural historian writing a book on Bristol (UK) buildings.
          > > There is a place in the city called Guild Heritage built in 1912-
          13
          > > by a private charity for disabled adults and children,
          particularly
          > > people who used wheelchairs or had restricted mobility. I have
          read
          > > that it is among (or is) the first such purpose designed building
          in
          > > the world but I somehow doubt that.
          > >
          > > If anyone knows when such buildings first came into being, or of
          > > books/research that would tell me more, please get in touch. I
          have
          > > seen the original plans for this building so for anyone
          interested I
          > > can give you more about the facilities provided. I know there was
          a
          > > hall and billiards room with table adapted for wheelchair use.
          > >
          > > The series is Pevsner Architectural Guides, published by Yale
          > > University Press.
          > >
          > > best regards, Andy Foyle
          > > andyf542@a...
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > To Subscribe, please send a blank message to:
          > > disabilitystudies-subscribe@e...
          > >
          > > To Unsubscribe, please send a blank message to:
          > > disabilitystudies-unsubscribe@e...
          > >
          > > To Post a message, send it to: disabilitystudies@e...
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > This mail sent through http://webmail.bangor.ac.uk
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.