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Obituary - Alan Desborough

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  • Keith Armstrong
    Alan Desborough, who has died aged 61, campaigned vigorously for the rights of disabled people - he himself had cerebral palsy - and was instrumental in
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 16, 2008
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      Alan Desborough, who has died aged 61, campaigned vigorously for the
      rights of disabled people - he himself had cerebral palsy - and was
      instrumental in revolutionising public transport and promoting
      independent living. He was also an immense personality: generous,
      irascible, funny, mischievous and audacious.

      Born and brought up in London, Des, as he was known, became involved
      in the politics of disability in the early 1970s with the opening of
      the King Henry's Walk hostel, in Islington, where he lived and was on
      the advisory board. This is where he learned about facilitation, which
      enabled him to control his life by employing other people as his arms
      and legs. He was one of the first disabled people to insist that he
      could live independently in his own home, and King Henry's marked a
      massive step towards realising that dream.

      As press officer for Dial-a-Ride in the 1980s - and as a lifelong
      socialist - Des was proud of the fact that the Thatcher government was
      forced to fund the transport service for disabled people and to
      establish a disability unit within London Regional Transport. He also
      loved recounting stories of blocking roads and holding up traffic in
      central London during the long struggle that led to buses becoming
      fully accessible to wheelchair users in the mid-1990s.

      The social policy degree Des took at North London University in the
      early 90s proved invaluable in his work for Disability Action in
      Islington and, later, the National Centre for Independent Living,
      where, as campaigns officer, he fought to establish the right to
      independent living for all disabled people, regardless of age or
      impairment.

      more goto <http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2008/jun/16/5>

      Alastair Levy, The Guardian, Monday June 16 2008
    • Slamet Thohari
      Dear all Let you know, my name is Slamet Thohari. Iam a disabled person. Iam also an activist of disability movement in Indonesia. In this year, I am going to
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 5, 2008
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        Dear all
        Let you know, my name is Slamet Thohari. Iam a disabled person. Iam also an activist of disability movement in Indonesia. In this year, I am going to continue my study in master programe in disability studies. As I know via internet, some disability studies are located in health or social work. I was based on pholosophy studies, by major social theories, especially in posmodern theories.

        really, I very need information on master program, disability studies in  the university  (USA, Europe,  or  Canada) which  has a social scince to see disability issue. I am going to take e reserach in history and its contestation of pople with disability in my contry, Indonesia (I am very interested in Foucault's thougth)

        it is vital for me, so I need information: university and professor who who is may interested to be my supervisor. I hope, via this mailis, some of you could give me suggestion.

        Slamet Thohari

        Yogyakarta
        Best whises



        Jai Guru Deva
        Slamet Thohari (Amex) Yogyakarta

        --- On Tue, 6/17/08, Keith Armstrong <keith.armstrong12@...> wrote:
        From: Keith Armstrong <keith.armstrong12@...>
        Subject: [disabilitystudies] Obituary - Alan Desborough
        To: disabilitystudies@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, June 17, 2008, 6:31 AM

        Alan Desborough, who has died aged 61, campaigned vigorously for the
        rights of disabled people - he himself had cerebral palsy - and was
        instrumental in revolutionising public transport and promoting
        independent living. He was also an immense personality: generous,
        irascible, funny, mischievous and audacious.

        Born and brought up in London, Des, as he was known, became involved
        in the politics of disability in the early 1970s with the opening of
        the King Henry's Walk hostel, in Islington, where he lived and was on
        the advisory board. This is where he learned about facilitation, which
        enabled him to control his life by employing other people as his arms
        and legs. He was one of the first disabled people to insist that he
        could live independently in his own home, and King Henry's marked a
        massive step towards realising that dream.

        As press officer for Dial-a-Ride in the 1980s - and as a lifelong
        socialist - Des was proud of the fact that the Thatcher government was
        forced to fund the transport service for disabled people and to
        establish a disability unit within London Regional Transport. He also
        loved recounting stories of blocking roads and holding up traffic in
        central London during the long struggle that led to buses becoming
        fully accessible to wheelchair users in the mid-1990s.

        The social policy degree Des took at North London University in the
        early 90s proved invaluable in his work for Disability Action in
        Islington and, later, the National Centre for Independent Living,
        where, as campaigns officer, he fought to establish the right to
        independent living for all disabled people, regardless of age or
        impairment.

        more goto <http://www.guardian .co.uk/theguardi an/2008/jun/ 16/5>

        Alastair Levy, The Guardian, Monday June 16 2008


      • lm murray
        Why Foucault especially? That might lead us to a professor or two. What have got so far in the way of university credits? Also, what about Australia and New
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 5, 2008
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          Why Foucault especially? That might lead us to a professor or two. What have got so far in the way of university credits? Also, what about Australia and New Zealand? I read lots of good stuff on disability issues from both.
           
          Louise

          --- On Fri, 9/5/08, Slamet Thohari <amexsip@...> wrote:
          From: Slamet Thohari <amexsip@...>
          Subject: [disabilitystudies] Help me in choosing master programe (Disability studies)
          To: disabilitystudies@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, September 5, 2008, 7:30 PM


          Dear all
          Let you know, my name is Slamet Thohari. Iam a disabled person. Iam also an activist of disability movement in Indonesia. In this year, I am going to continue my study in master programe in disability studies. As I know via internet, some disability studies are located in health or social work. I was based on pholosophy studies, by major social theories, especially in posmodern theories.

          really, I very need information on master program, disability studies in  the university  (USA, Europe,  or  Canada) which  has a social scince to see disability issue. I am going to take e reserach in history and its contestation of pople with disability in my contry, Indonesia (I am very interested in Foucault's thougth)

          it is vital for me, so I need information: university and professor who who is may interested to be my supervisor. I hope, via this mailis, some of you could give me suggestion.

          Slamet Thohari

          Yogyakarta
          Best whises



          Jai Guru Deva
          Slamet Thohari (Amex) Yogyakarta

          --- On Tue, 6/17/08, Keith Armstrong <keith.armstrong12@ tiscali.co. uk> wrote:
          From: Keith Armstrong <keith.armstrong12@ tiscali.co. uk>
          Subject: [disabilitystudies] Obituary - Alan Desborough
          To: disabilitystudies@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Tuesday, June 17, 2008, 6:31 AM

          Alan Desborough, who has died aged 61, campaigned vigorously for the
          rights of disabled people - he himself had cerebral palsy - and was
          instrumental in revolutionising public transport and promoting
          independent living. He was also an immense personality: generous,
          irascible, funny, mischievous and audacious.

          Born and brought up in London, Des, as he was known, became involved
          in the politics of disability in the early 1970s with the opening of
          the King Henry's Walk hostel, in Islington, where he lived and was on
          the advisory board. This is where he learned about facilitation, which
          enabled him to control his life by employing other people as his arms
          and legs. He was one of the first disabled people to insist that he
          could live independently in his own home, and King Henry's marked a
          massive step towards realising that dream.

          As press officer for Dial-a-Ride in the 1980s - and as a lifelong
          socialist - Des was proud of the fact that the Thatcher government was
          forced to fund the transport service for disabled people and to
          establish a disability unit within London Regional Transport. He also
          loved recounting stories of blocking roads and holding up traffic in
          central London during the long struggle that led to buses becoming
          fully accessible to wheelchair users in the mid-1990s.

          The social policy degree Des took at North London University in the
          early 90s proved invaluable in his work for Disability Action in
          Islington and, later, the National Centre for Independent Living,
          where, as campaigns officer, he fought to establish the right to
          independent living for all disabled people, regardless of age or
          impairment.

          more goto <http://www.guardian .co.uk/theguardi an/2008/jun/ 16/5>

          Alastair Levy, The Guardian, Monday June 16 2008



        • lm murray
          Sept. 17/08   Everyone,   I m pig-bitin mad this a.m. at Vancouver Mayor Sam Sullivan, who told CBC s Early Edition that athletes with disabilities are
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 17, 2008
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            Sept. 17/08
             
            Everyone,
             
            I'm pig-bitin' mad this a.m. at Vancouver Mayor Sam Sullivan, who told CBC's Early Edition that athletes with disabilities are the best 'spokespeople' - they provide the most effective tool, if you will -  to improve the public profile of people with disabilities.
             
            I don't know about the rest of you but I know that if the local disability coalition had even a small PERCENTAGE of the funding wheelchair jocks receive, legions of needy people with disabilities in this city would no longer be homeless and living in the most abject poverty. Furthermore, wheelchair jocks benefit FAR MORE from the big brains and passionate commitment of disability advocates like Sandra Carpenter, Don Barrie, Keith, our UK facilitator, Nilesh in Mombai and many apparently invisible (to our mayor, anyway) others worldwide than they EVER do from athletics!
             
            Once again, his worship has managed to insult and offend the disability community of which he himself is a part and on whose advocacy skills he may very well rely one day - IF his efforts as mayor toward that community are justly rewarded.
             
            Please take a moment, everyone, to join me in wishing the at long last outgoing Mayor Sullivan all the luck he deserves. E-mail your outrage to mayorandcouncil@....
             
            Louise
             

          • lm murray
            Hi Everyone,   I m doing some research at the moment on what to know about claiming disabiltiy benefits contained in a workplace insurance plan (basically,
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 24, 2008
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              Hi Everyone,
               
              I'm doing some research at the moment on what to know about claiming disabiltiy benefits contained in a workplace insurance plan (basically, get a lawyer early on while the fight is still winnable - before you end up on the public roll) and would welcome any comments/questions - anything at all, really - on the stuff so far -
               
               
              Concurrently, I'm puzzling over a submission to a royal commission on B.C. workers comp in 1998 by an outfit called the National Institute of Disability Management and Research http://www.nidmar.ca/index.asp, whose recommendations seem very much to favor employers over workers. The fact that the anti-disability B.C. gov't just gave them $1 million grant to 'study' casts even more shadows over the org. Am I wrong to question their commitment this way? Anyone with experience with this group?
               
              Also, I note that their keynote conference this year is in Germany. Why, I wonder? Is the German disability benefits model notably a world leader we should emulate?
               
              All comments most gratefully received! And do pass this message along to others who might be interested.
               
              Louise

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