Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

NEW PHOTO ALBUM: London Architecture Biennale 2006

Expand Messages
  • Keith Armstrong
    new photos uploaded any comments? Keith
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      new photos uploaded

      any comments?


      Keith
    • lm murray
      Shades of the prison house begin to close...I m looking at those women sort of perched uncomfortably on the boards that appear to operate as benches. Not
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 6 4:00 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Shades of the prison house begin to close...I'm looking at those women sort of perched uncomfortably on the boards that appear to operate as benches.  Not exactly welcoming, is it?  Why do they need so many stairs and wooden slats like cages?  Who are they trying to keep out, one wonders, or is THAT AGAIN the point?
         
        I marvel ceaselessly at the proliferation of large, unfriendly, tomblike buildings so confusing I have no idea even where the main entrance is.  Yet these are the idiot barrier-full, inaccessible and high-priced architects celebrated by the media and effete urban planners who continue to receive commissions.
         
        Growl..
         
        Louise
         


        Keith Armstrong <keitharm@...> wrote:
        new photos uploaded

        any comments?

        Keith



        Now you can have a huge leap forward in email: get the new Yahoo! Mail.

      • Keith Armstrong
        Hi Louise Congratulations! You spotted their errors. What worries me is that the London Architecture Biennale is meant to be a celebration of the best of
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 10 3:15 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Louise

          Congratulations! You spotted their errors.

          What worries me is that the London Architecture Biennale is meant to
          be a celebration of 'the best' of British architecture and to make
          'architecture more accessible to the public'. I personally drew
          attention to the lack of access, before they had completed their
          construction. The students (from the London Metropolitan University,
          31 Jewry Street, London EC3N 2EY) refused, although they admitted they
          hadn't thought about the issue. So part of the problem is the way they
          are taught about their profession.

          London Architecture Biennale 2006 details:

          85 Clerkenwell Road
          London EC1R 5AR
          Tel: 020 7269 0074
          Email: stella@...
          Website: www.londonbiennale.org.uk
          <www.londonbiennale.org.uk>

          Had the constructure been permanent, it would have fall foul of Part M
          of the 1985 Building Act. The UK Disability Discrimination Act is now
          11 years old.

          The British Library offical policy is:

          Access for People with Disabilities: British Library Policy Statement

          The long term aim of the British Library is to provide equality of
          access to its services for all users and staff. This policy is
          intended to ensure inclusiveness, equity and independence so that
          people with

          disabilities can be full users of our services. We intend, to the
          extent possible, that they should be able to use services
          independently, without additional intermediaries.

          The British Library has set the following objectives in order to
          develop its access services to meet the needs of users and staff:

          * to provide a positive welcome to all staff and users with
          disabilities.
          * to try to make all services and premises accessible, regardless
          of a user's disability, wherever possible and/or practicable.
          * to be conscious of the impact on users or staff with
          disabilities when undertaking any works on Library sites.
          * to advise users when the Library is unable to provide the level
          of support that they might require, so that they are aware if they
          need to make their own additional arrangements.
          * to develop information sources (including the Library's
          catalogues) in formats and with equipment that can enhance access by
          people with disabilities.
          * to seek structured feedback from service users and staff on how
          far services and facilities are meeting their needs.
          * to provide expert advice to staff and users.
          * to develop the understanding and skills of staff to help them
          manage and provide services to those with disabilities, whether users
          or colleagues.

          I hope you find the above interesting

          Have a good week

          Keith


          --- In disabilitystudies@yahoogroups.com, lm murray <lmm789@...> wrote:
          >
          > Shades of the prison house begin to close...I'm looking at those
          women sort of perched uncomfortably on the boards that appear to
          operate as benches. Not exactly welcoming, is it? Why do they need
          so many stairs and wooden slats like cages? Who are they trying to
          keep out, one wonders, or is THAT AGAIN the point?
          >
          > I marvel ceaselessly at the proliferation of large, unfriendly,
          tomblike buildings so confusing I have no idea even where the main
          entrance is. Yet these are the idiot barrier-full, inaccessible and
          high-priced architects celebrated by the media and effete urban
          planners who continue to receive commissions.
          >
          > Growl..
          >
          > Louise
        • lm murray
          That s nothing. Our School of Architecture (University of British Columbia)doesn t even have a Universal Design course. Even worse, it s no longer possible
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 11 3:25 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            That's nothing.  Our School of Architecture (University of British Columbia)doesn't even have a Universal Design course.  Even worse, it's no longer possible to order the Wolfgang Preiser/Elaine Ostoroff text, the leading authority on these design issues, at Amazon tho Elaine was trying to get McGraw Hill to put it online when last we spoke.  Right in the intro, Wolfie describes the 'perfect human' model architects are taught to design for and how ludicrous this is.  You're not an architect, are you, by the way? 
             
            Louise

            Keith Armstrong <keitharm@...> wrote:
            Hi Louise

            Congratulations! You spotted their errors.

            What worries me is that the London Architecture Biennale is meant to
            be a celebration of 'the best' of British architecture and to make
            'architecture more accessible to the public'. I personally drew
            attention to the lack of access, before they had completed their
            construction. The students (from the London Metropolitan University,
            31 Jewry Street, London EC3N 2EY) refused, although they admitted they
            hadn't thought about the issue. So part of the problem is the way they
            are taught about their profession.

            London Architecture Biennale 2006 details:

            85 Clerkenwell Road
            London EC1R 5AR
            Tel: 020 7269 0074
            Email: stella@wordsearch. co.uk
            Website: www.londonbiennale. org.uk
            <www.londonbiennale .org.uk>

            Had the constructure been permanent, it would have fall foul of Part M
            of the 1985 Building Act. The UK Disability Discrimination Act is now
            11 years old.

            The British Library offical policy is:

            Access for People with Disabilities: British Library Policy Statement

            The long term aim of the British Library is to provide equality of
            access to its services for all users and staff. This policy is
            intended to ensure inclusiveness, equity and independence so that
            people with

            disabilities can be full users of our services. We intend, to the
            extent possible, that they should be able to use services
            independently, without additional intermediaries.

            The British Library has set the following objectives in order to
            develop its access services to meet the needs of users and staff:

            * to provide a positive welcome to all staff and users with
            disabilities.
            * to try to make all services and premises accessible, regardless
            of a user's disability, wherever possible and/or practicable.
            * to be conscious of the impact on users or staff with
            disabilities when undertaking any works on Library sites.
            * to advise users when the Library is unable to provide the level
            of support that they might require, so that they are aware if they
            need to make their own additional arrangements.
            * to develop information sources (including the Library's
            catalogues) in formats and with equipment that can enhance access by
            people with disabilities.
            * to seek structured feedback from service users and staff on how
            far services and facilities are meeting their needs.
            * to provide expert advice to staff and users.
            * to develop the understanding and skills of staff to help them
            manage and provide services to those with disabilities, whether users
            or colleagues.

            I hope you find the above interesting

            Have a good week

            Keith

            --- In disabilitystudies@ yahoogroups. com, lm murray <lmm789@...> wrote:
            >
            > Shades of the prison house begin to close...I'm looking at those
            women sort of perched uncomfortably on the boards that appear to
            operate as benches. Not exactly welcoming, is it? Why do they need
            so many stairs and wooden slats like cages? Who are they trying to
            keep out, one wonders, or is THAT AGAIN the point?
            >
            > I marvel ceaselessly at the proliferation of large, unfriendly,
            tomblike buildings so confusing I have no idea even where the main
            entrance is. Yet these are the idiot barrier-full, inaccessible and
            high-priced architects celebrated by the media and effete urban
            planners who continue to receive commissions.
            >
            > Growl..
            >
            > Louise




            Make free worldwide PC-to-PC calls. Try the new Yahoo! Canada Messenger with Voice

          • Keith Armstrong
            Louise I am not an architect, although I was involved with building design for a London local council housing department for about three years. Keith ...
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 13 7:36 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Louise

              I am not an architect, although I was involved with building design
              for a London local council housing department for about three years.

              Keith



              --- In disabilitystudies@yahoogroups.com, lm murray <lmm789@...> wrote:
              >
              > That's nothing. Our School of Architecture (University of British
              Columbia)doesn't even have a Universal Design course. Even worse,
              it's no longer possible to order the Wolfgang Preiser/Elaine Ostoroff
              text, the leading authority on these design issues, at Amazon tho
              Elaine was trying to get McGraw Hill to put it online when last we
              spoke. Right in the intro, Wolfie describes the 'perfect human' model
              architects are taught to design for and how ludicrous this is. You're
              not an architect, are you, by the way?
              >
              > Louise
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.