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Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning contacts

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  • AA0OI
    Hi Ed: for some it works, for some it does not.. It does not work for me.. I have tried many different grounds, but always end up with problems ( hum , ect) 
    Message 1 of 37 , Sep 7, 2008
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      Hi Ed:

      for some it works, for some it does not.. It does not work for me.. I have tried many different grounds, but always end up with problems ( hum , ect)  Try it, it won't hurt.  But I think you'll find that you want to isolate the computer as much as possible completly

       


       
      Garrett / AA0OI


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Ed Gabbard <kd5dpk@...>
      To: digsstv@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 6:18:19 PM
      Subject: Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning contacts

      On the static proublem, Is it good to connect the station ground to the computer case?

      Ed kd5dpk

      --- On Sun, 9/7/08, AA0OI <aa0oi@yahoo. com> wrote:

      > From: AA0OI <aa0oi@yahoo. com>
      > Subject: Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning contacts
      > To: digsstv@yahoogroups .com
      > Date: Sunday, September 7, 2008, 2:16 PM
      > And a Big one you forgot,, DO NOT  set your computer on the
      > rug, static builds up and will raise hell with it..
      > Trust me,,
      > and if you think that I am wrong,, how many Hams out there
      > put a filters on there fans,, or even clean them,, It would
      > be interesting to know... I'll bet that its not that
      > many !! hams or not..
      >
      >  
      > Garrett / AA0OI
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: Andy Eskelson <andyyahoo@g0poy. co.uk>
      > To: digsstv@yahoogroups .com
      > Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 1:10:57 PM
      > Subject: Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning contacts
      >
      >
      > I will agree that the average joe public computer user will
      > not have a
      > clue. However people running SSTV/Digi should be technical
      > enough to
      > understand the issue and deal with it.
      >
      > A simple metal filter, does not need changing just cleaning
      > i.e. vacuum
      > it out every so often costs about 4 pounds or less for a
      > 120mm fan. worth
      > the time IF you have problems. This will stop most of the
      > large
      > particulates getting into the machine.
      >
      > As for how often you clean filters, that depends on
      > environment and how
      > long the machine is on for. You use your eyes to find out.
      >
      > Screws coming out of M/board - never been a problem. can
      > only be
      > incorrect assembly or materials.
      >
      > Improperly seated cards - again incorrect assembly. or bad
      > transit
      > handling.
      >
      > With such faults the big culprit is vibration, comes in
      > many forms. The
      > obvious types are when the unit gets bumped while moving,
      > if the direction
      > of the force is in alignment with the card then they can
      > move, especially
      > with heavy cards such as the graphic cards with big
      > heatsinks and fans -
      > their mass works against them and can pop them out of the
      > socket
      > normally at the far end. Some of the more modern cards have
      > locking
      > arrangements at the far end of the socket to help mitigate
      > such problems.
      >
      > Once the problem is identified, seating correctly and
      > ensuring that the
      > screws are tight should prevent the problem. Checking this
      > out is part of
      > most installation procedures. Not a bad idea for the
      > technical home
      > user to do the same.
      >
      > Smaller scale vibration is caused mainly by fans and
      > drives. This should
      > not cause problems if the machine is correctly built. If
      > the screws are
      > correctly tightened with the correct retaining method then
      > the problem
      > should not happen. (I use 100's of Dell products and
      > they do not exhibit
      > problems of this type.)
      >
      > Should anyone find problems of this sort then the cure is
      > to do things
      > correctly, use shakeproof washers, use screwlock compound
      > or whatever.
      >
      > The point is that a correctly built machine does not have
      > these
      > problems.
      >
      > Failed fans, that happens, not much you can do about that.
      > Unless you
      > find that the failure is due to the fan becoming clogged
      > with muck. The
      > you have got to think about stopping the muck getting into
      > the machine.
      >
      > If you site your PC:
      > where is gets hot due to poor airflow
      > where it gets hot coz is sitting in the sun all the time
      > where it gets a lot of dirt on it (i.e. it sits on the
      > floor)
      > where it gets kicked and knocked
      > ...
      >
      > You ARE going to have problems.
      >
      > I don't think anyone is saying provide a datacenter
      > class environment
      > for home use, but technical people here should be more than
      > capable of
      > understanding the problems (if they have them) and doing
      > something to
      > improve their lot. it's not hard just takes a little
      > effort.
      >
      > Andy
      >
      > On Sun, 7 Sep 2008 09:58:19 -0700 (PDT)
      > AA0OI <aa0oi@yahoo. com> wrote:
      >
      > > Filter on Fans?? in home systems?? In the 30 years I
      > have been doing this, I have never seen one (on home
      > system), none in Dell, none in Compaq.. The reason they
      > don't put them in, is that they would have to cleaned
      > about once a week ( or they would plug, system would over
      > heat and die) in the normal home environment.
      > > People just would not do it.. Yes everyone could: air
      > condition there computer room to 63 degrees, micro filter
      > the air in the room, put a frequency stabilizer and voltage
      > control on the lines, rf chokes on everything,
      > > lightening arrest-er on dsl lines, etc etc ect.. BUT
      > it will NOT happen..
      > > 40% of the problems I see in computers are: screws
      > working out of the motherboard ( no ground) or loose.
      > > 25% improperly seated or corroded contacts ( video and
      > sound cards at the top of the list)
      > > 20% failed fans
      > > 15% other
      > > That's not counting software problem, Virus,bad
      > divers, VISTA
      > > Put a filter on the fans and that number would double
      > !  Lets face it most homes are just not that clean of dust
      > > and dirt, dog hair, cat hair, my hair..
      > >
      > > Garrett / AA0OI
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message ----
      > > From: Andy Eskelson <andyyahoo@g0poy. co.uk>
      > > To: digsstv@yahoogroups .com
      > > Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 10:39:01 AM
      > > Subject: Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning
      > contacts
      > >
      > >
      > > In the early days of electronics the gold plating on
      > edge connectors was
      > > quite heavy, in fact it was worthwhile to chop off the
      > edge connectors and
      > > process then to recover the gold. Such connectors
      > would survive fairly
      > > rough cleaning.
      > >
      > > Technology has changed, the gold plating today is only
      > a few molecules
      > > thick, and is not very robust. Cleaning with any sort
      > of harsh abrasive is
      > > not a good idea.
      > >
      > > Connector systems are designed to provide as far as
      > possible, a gas tight
      > > connection between the two surfaces, if this is
      > maintained then there
      > > should be no problems with connections.
      > >
      > > If people do find that they have continuous issues
      > with connections
      > > then that is indictive of some underlying problem. Of
      > course it
      > > could be a connector issue, nothing is perfect after
      > all, but other
      > > issues such as the mechanical stability of the
      > connectors, vibration
      > > i.e. from fans, temperature variations and the general
      > environment are
      > > all likely causes.
      > >
      > > Any movement causing the connector springs to break
      > contact slightly with
      > > the edge connectors can allow a film of muck to build
      > up. If this does
      > > happen then a simple wipe with a cleaning tissue is
      > all that is required.
      > > A cleaning solution can be used if the buildup is
      > particularly heavy, Iso
      > > based products are fine for this. With products such
      > as servisol you
      > > have to be aware of the lubricant function, it is not
      > recommended in the
      > > normal course of events as the lubricant traps the
      > muck. So a product
      > > without lubricant is better.
      > >
      > > I have many hundreds of computers running in the
      > datacentre, all of
      > > various types and ages. The cleaning of contacts is
      > NEVER part of system
      > > maintenance. The run time of these systems is years, I
      > even had a few
      > > 386/486 machines sitting is some racks that were
      > running for 9 or
      > > so years without any problems we finally replaced them
      > a year or so ago
      > > when the product they provided was replaced. The key
      > is the environment,
      > > it's clean and stable and the systems are well
      > installed.
      > >
      > > From time to time I get the odd home PC to
      > "fix" and there is one huge
      > > difference between these home PC's and the
      > PC's in the datacentre, and
      > > that is dirt. Open up the home PC and it is normally
      > full of dust and
      > > muck, the first job is to vacuum it out. Open up a PC
      > of the same
      > > vintage in the datacentre, and it is pretty clean, not
      > perfect by any
      > > means but far far cleaner. It should be as the HVAC
      > system filters the
      > > air, and the filters are changed every few months.
      > When this happens you
      > > can see where the muck ends up. The muck is the source
      > of the
      > > contamination build up on contacts , keep the muck out
      > and you will have
      > > far fewer problems. So keeping an eye on the fan
      > filters is a good idea
      > > and if you don't have any filters then they might
      > be worth thinking about.
      > >
      > > If you do use an abrasive of any sort on edge
      > connectors then you will
      > > increase the risk of future problems, the more you
      > clean then the worse
      > > things can get. You might get away with it, and as
      > Garrett says the short
      > > life of the machines may make a difference. I would
      > add some caution to
      > > this as machines now are very powerful, and there is
      > not such a need to
      > > replace them as there was in the past. (Apart from
      > wanting some new toys
      > > to play with of course :-)
      > >
      > > As always the system is yours and so is the risk...
      > just be careful.
      > >
      > > The credit card type contacts, well they live and are
      > used in a very
      > > dirty environment. The data rates are fairly slow and
      > the contact areas
      > > are quite big, so they tend to work quite well.
      > However they will pick up
      > > lots to grease and dirt, so giving them a clean will
      > help. A pencil
      > > eraser is a bit harsh but as cards are normally only
      > valid for three
      > > years, and given the large contact areas I doubt if it
      > would cause too
      > > many problems.
      > >
      > > Andy
      > >
      > > On Sun, 7 Sep 2008 06:18:44 -0700 (PDT)
      > > AA0OI <aa0oi@yahoo. com> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Average life of a computer ( before it becomes
      > obsolete- in the states) is 3 to 4 years. after cleaning
      > "gold" tabs 2 to 3 times it wouldn't matter,
      > its time to throw it out and buy a new one.. When windows
      > "system 7"
      > > > rears it ugly head at the end of 2009, single
      > core processors will be a thing of the past ( they probably
      > will not even
      > > > run the new system-- 2 cores or better to open)..
      > we all could be running "Abacus" and no one would
      > have to clean anything (except the beads-don't clean
      > your beads with steel wool).. Cleaning with steel wool will
      > not make any difference, by the time it would have done any
      > damage, it would be so far out of date, it would be time to
      > replace anyway!!  see you in the future !!
      > > >
      > > >  
      > > > Garrett / AA0OI
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message ----
      > > > From: Lee Moore (Gimbert) <leemoore500@
      > hotmail.com>
      > > > To: digsstv@yahoogroups .com
      > > > Sent: Saturday, September 6, 2008 8:41:27 PM
      > > > Subject: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning
      > contacts
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hi John.
      > > >
      > > > Yes, i suggested a pencil eraser because it works
      > and is advised in
      > > > the UK (unofficially of course) by local
      > suppliers of smart cards, to
      > > > occasionaly gently clean the (supposedly) gold
      > plated terminals as a
      > > > pencil eraser is most likely to be handy at the
      > time and, it
      > > > certainly is more gentle than (Quote) wire wool,
      > emery stick etc and
      > > > is more likey to be handy than professional
      > cleaner... I do also have
      > > > Isopropyl `Rubbing` Alcohol (well i did, it has
      > probably evaporated
      > > > away by now!!) and cotton buds but find Servisol
      > much more handy in
      > > > confined spaces.... just checked and have a few
      > drops in the
      > > > container!!
      > > > It`s a question of general availability really i
      > suppose.
      > > >
      > > > Lee ... G6ZSG.
      > > >
      > > > --- In digsstv@yahoogroups .com, Commander John
      > <crazytvjohn@ ...>
      > > > wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Interesting, cleanings by,  steel wool,
      > sandpaper and pencil
      > > > erasers.
      > > > >
      > > > > That is almost as bad as the advice to put
      > Mazola corn oil in the
      > > > heath kit dummy load.
      > > > > and use wd40 for plug in relays, or to spray
      > it in VCR to repair a
      > > > tape eat problem.
      > > > >  
      > > > > If I had to clean contacts and I did it
      > it professionally for a
      > > > quarter century .  Remember TV sets used plug in
      > contacts as did
      > > > regular vacuum tubes sets.  Contact cleaner has
      > killed  a lot of
      > > > sets over the years and costs a lot of dough to
      > purchase.
      > > > >  
      > > > > The material to use is isoproypl alchol 99%
      > concentration.  I used
      > > > Scott 1000 tissue and rubbed very lightly the
      > contact.  For tube
      > > > contact. I placed the tube pins in a small
      > container of alchol and
      > > > pluged it into the socket. Pulled it out and
      > dipped again and
      > > > repluged. This works every time. Do not use
      > rubbing 70& alchol.  This
      > > > contains water and evaporated much more slowly.
      > Isoproypl 99 alchol
      > > > is available at drug stores for $1.50 or so.
      > > > > john w9zy
      > > > >  
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >  
      > > > > W9ZY
      > > > >               .... Commander
      > John ....
      > > > >
      >                        
      > > > >  
      > > > >  
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >


    • Stan
      There is a BIG difference between grounding the negative lead and grounding the case. Many times as you saw the negative lead is isolated from he case.
      Message 37 of 37 , Sep 8, 2008
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        There is a BIG difference between grounding the negative lead and grounding the case. Many times as you saw the negative lead is isolated from he case. Personally I think it is always a good idea to ground the case of computers and everything.
         
        Stan, WA2UET
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, September 07, 2008 7:46 PM
        Subject: Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning contact, Now grounding computers?

        If equipment does not have a ground lug for direct grounding I do not think you should ground it.
        That dude Jay at array solutions told me to ground my astron rs-35M power supply negative supply lead.  A very loud arcing sound resulted from something.  The supply survived and still works.  I was lucky that day.  Exercise caution in this regard.  Just because someone big says something doesn't make it right or true.  Ask Walter Maxwell about bad information that is around.  He wrote a book about it.  I think it is called Reflections.
        john w9zy   
         
         
        W9ZY
                      .... Commander John ....
                               
         


        --- On Sun, 9/7/08, Ed Gabbard <kd5dpk@yahoo. com> wrote:
        From: Ed Gabbard <kd5dpk@yahoo. com>
        Subject: Re: [digsstv] Re: hamdrm.dll> cleaning contacts
        To: digsstv@yahoogroups .com
        Date: Sunday, September 7, 2008, 6:18 PM

        On the static proublem, Is it good to connect the station ground to the computer
        case?
        
        Ed kd5dpk
        
        
        

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