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Re: intention/meditation/pariyatti

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  • rjkjp1
    ... rupas, ... wise ... me ... meditation ... Dear Robert I think you may still wonder why at dsg there is such emphasis on theory on pariyatti, perhaps this
    Message 1 of 149 , Feb 2, 2009
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      > > > --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Epstein"
      > > > <epsteinrob@> wrote:
      > > > >> Again, if you believe that somehow everyday namas and
      rupas,
      > > > dhamma
      > > > > reading and study, com reading and interpretation and the
      wise
      > > advice
      > > > > of the spiritual friend somehow promotes panna in a way that is
      > > > > impossible in meditation, I would like to know how starting out
      > > > > without panna develops sati in those situations, but cannot in
      > > > > meditation. I am still waiting for this clear distinction that to
      me
      > > > > has never been given. Perhaps you can explain why the
      meditation
      > > > > intention is worse than the sutta intention or any other intention
      > > > > which is pointed in the Buddha's direction.
      > > > >
      Dear Robert
      I think you may still wonder why at dsg there is such emphasis on
      theory on pariyatti, perhaps this quote from the ancient texts helps to
      develop faith in the Dhamma. As you see even some ancient monsk
      went astray until it was properly explained:


      Pariyatti as the Root of the Sâsanâ

      (From the Atthakathâ to Anguttara Nikâya, Ekanipâta,
      Dutiyapamâdâdivagga, 42nd sutta)




      """"""And in that place [Maṇḍalârâma Monastery in Kallagâma] there
      arose a discussion among the elders as to whether the root of the
      Dispensation consisted in practice (paṭipatti) or in study of the Teaching
      (pariyatti). Those elders who were wearers of rag-robes said, "practice
      is the root," and those elders who were teachers of Dhamma
      said, "study is the root."

      Then some elders said, "we cannot decide between your two opinions
      merely on the basis of your assertions. Support them by quoting a
      saying spoken by the Conqueror."

      "It will be no trouble to quote a saying," replied both sides. Then the
      elders who were wearers of rag-robes quoted these passages:

      "Subhadda, if bhikkhus in this very Dispensation were to live rightly, the
      world would not be empty of arahants."

      "Your majesty, the Teacher's Dispensation is rooted in practice and has
      practice as its pith. While practice is maintained, the Dispensation lasts."

      After listening to these sayings, the elders who were teachers of
      Dhamma then quoted this saying as proof of their own claim:

      "For as long the Suttantas endure, for as long as the Vinaya is taught,
      For just that long will there be light, like that after the sun has risen.
      But when the Suttantas are no more, and when the Vinaya is forgotten,
      There will be darkness in the world, like that after the sun has set.
      While the Suttantas are protected, then is practice protected too;
      A sage, being grounded in practice, fails not to reach peace from the
      bonds."

      When this saying was quoted, the elders who were wearers of rag-
      robes became silent and the speech of the teachers of Dhamma
      prevailed.

      Neither among a hundred bulls, nor among a thousand, will even a
      single bull ensure the continuance of his line in the absence of a cow.
      Even so, neither among a hundred bhikkhus intent on insight, nor
      among a thousand, will even a single bhikkhu penetrate the noble path
      in the absence of pariyatti.

      Marks are engraved in rock to show the location of buried treasure; for
      as long as those marks endure, the treasure is not reckoned as lost.
      Even so, for as long as pariyatti endures, the Teacher's Dispensation is
      not reckoned to have disappeared."""""
      (Manorathapûraṇî i. 92-3, translation by venerable Dhammanando)

      Robert
    • philip
      Hi Sarah ... Thanks for the clear explanation. Phil
      Message 149 of 149 , Dec 5, 2011
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        Hi Sarah

        > S: Right - dvara (door) and vatthu (base).

        Thanks for the clear explanation.

        Phil
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