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Re: [dsg] Perfections N, no 36

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  • sarah abbott
    Dear Nina, Jon, James & all, ... .... S: Good to consider this sutta further which you quoted. The Saaraa.niiya Sutta. I checked saaraa.niiyya in the dict:
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2007
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      Dear Nina, Jon, James & all,

      --- Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...> wrote:

      > Dear friends,
      >
      > The Buddha preached to the monks about mettå, exhorting them to show
      > each other kindness through body, speech and mind, both in public and
      > in private. We read in the ‘Gradual Sayings” (Book of the Sixes, Ch
      > II, par. 1, On being considerate):
      >
      > Monks, there are six ways of being considerate. What six?
      ....
      S: Good to consider this sutta further which you quoted. The Saaraa.niiya
      Sutta. I checked 'saaraa.niiyya in the dict: 'fit to be remembered'. So
      then we see the 6 ways of being considerate:
      .....
      > Herein, monks, a monk’s part is amity in deed towards his fellows in
      > the godly life, openly and in private; verily, this is a way of being
      > considerate.
      >
      > Again, his part is amity in word. . .amity in thought towards his
      > fellows in the godly life, openly and in private; this also is a way
      > of being considerate.
      >
      > Then, those proper gains, gotten according to rule— be they but bowl-
      > scraps, he loves to share them impartially, to have them in common
      > with his virtuous fellows in the godly life; this also is a way of
      > being considerate.
      >
      > And those virtues that are unbroken, without flaw, spotless, without
      > blemish, bringing freedom, praised by wise men, incor-ruptible,
      > leading to concentration- he dwells one in virtue with them among his
      > fellows in the godly life, openly and in private; this also is a way
      > of being considerate.
      ....
      S: Amity is metta. So metta is stressed in the first 3 ways.

      In the 5th way, sila is stressed. I was reminded of some earlier
      discussion in the dana corner when we mentioned sila as a kindness, as
      consideration or a gift to others. Who has developed 'unbroken virue'? The
      sotapanna through the development of understanding. So here we see the
      'social aspect' which friends often ask about.

      'Leading to concentration...' Without 'spotless' sila, right concentration
      cannot become 'spotless'.

      [Diversion: This reminds me - I was also looking at the start of a section
      Jon referred to in his discussion with James on 'concentration' in Vism
      111, 28. The text reads:

      "But mundane concentration should be developed by one who has taken his
      stand on virtue that is quite purified in the way already stated. He
      should sever any of the ten impediments that he may have. He should then
      approach the good friend, the giver of a meditation subject.....etc"

      Pali:
      "Yo panaaya.m lokiyo, so vuttanayena siilaani visodhetvaa suparisuddhe
      siile patit.t.thitena, yvaassa dasasu palibodhesu palibodho atthi, ta.m
      upacchinditvaa kamma.t.thaanadaayaka.m kalyaa.namitta.m
      upasa~nkamitvaa...."
      .....
      S: Again we have the sila which is quite purified (su-parisuddhe). (In
      ch1, 131, there is a description of the different kinds of paarisuddha
      siila to consider here...???)

      This next part of this text is intersting. In the English translation
      (Nanamoli), we have 'he should sever...', 'he should then....'. The Pali
      (upacchinditva...., upasa~nkamitva.....,) looks more like 'having
      purified....', 'having severed...', 'having approached....'???

      Without very firm sila and without having already severed the ten
      impediments discussed, how can access or absorption concentration possibly
      be attained?]
      ....
      > And that ariyan view, saving, leading him who acts accordantly to the
      > utter destruction of Ill- he dwells one in view with that among his
      > fellows in the godly life, openly and in private; this is also a way
      > of being considerate.
      >
      > Verily, monks, these are the six ways of being considerate.
      >
      > These six ways of being considerate, and above all satipatthãna, lead
      > to harmony and unity between the monks.
      ....
      S: Yes, especially the development of satipatthan, the development of the
      right view which leads to the 'ariyan view'. This is the greatest kind of
      consideration, leading to harmony not just amongst monks, but amongst lay
      people too!

      So again we see that development of the path leads to kinder social
      interactions and living at 'ease' in the world around us, no matter what
      our lifestyles.

      Comments most welcome...

      Metta,

      Sarah
      ========
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