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Re: [dsg] Re: Sangiitisutta and co. Four developments of concentration.

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  • Nina van Gorkom
    Hi Rob K, Tep,Steve. I looked up the Commentary I have in Pali. I cannot translate all, because it takes too long. I hope Steve can check. Four developments of
    Message 1 of 285 , Dec 2, 2005
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      Hi Rob K, Tep,Steve.
      I looked up the Commentary I have in Pali.
      I cannot translate all, because it takes too long. I hope Steve can check.

      Four developments of concentration.
      I: This is about phala-samaapatti: fruition attainment (those who have
      developed samatha and vipassana). And here these are jhanas produced
      afterwards by the arahat (kiin'aasavassa).
      II: This is in order to drive away torpor. It is the knowledge of divine eye
      of the arahat. He causes the arising of a luminous citta having jhana
      attainment as a basis (paadaka-jjhaana-samaapattim).
      III, this refers to the arahat. What is said of feeling also pertains to
      saññaa, cetanaa. He sees that, dependent on the arising of avijjaa, feeling
      arises. Dependent on craving, kamma, dependent on contact, feeling.
      How does he understand feeling? Paying attention to impermanence he sees its
      destruction, paying attention to dukkha he sees its danger, paying
      attention to anattaa he sees its emptiness.
      He realizes the dependent origination in reverse: because of the cessation
      of ignorance, there is the cessation of feeling, etc.
      IV: This is ruupa: here the same method is to be applied.
      This is the development of concentration based on jhaana
      (paadaka-jjhaana-samaadhi-bhaavanaa) in the case of the knowledge of
      canker-destruction.

      *****
      Nina.

      op 01-12-2005 02:10 schreef Tep Sastri op tepsastri@...:

      > Digha Nikaya, sangiti sutta (sutta 33) page 488 of Walshe
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > -----
      >> R: Note that (b) is a special type of samatha meditation giving powers
      > of mundane vision. Thus in these two suttas the four mundane jhanas
      > are given a specific category different from the types of samadhi which
      > result in sati-sampajana or the destrution of the defilements.
      >
      > Tep: This sutta is very much the same as AN IV.41, which was
      > translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Notice that only the first of the four
      > meditations is about the four arupa-jhanas; mundane or not, it is not
      > clear. The second one (i.e. b.: "Here, a monk attends to the perception
      > of light, he fixes his mind to the perception of day, by night as by day,
      > by day as by night.") is 'aloka-sanna', NOT the four rupa-jhanas.
    • Jonothan Abbott
      Hi Joop ... It could also be stated in a one-step formulation as the kusala resolution to refrain from akusala about to be done (this also avoids the
      Message 285 of 285 , Jan 5, 2006
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        Hi Joop

        Joop wrote:

        >Hallo Jon
        >
        >I prefer not to repeat myself and not discuss linguistic
        >misunderstandings.
        >Waiting for your separately message on "the accumulations point" I
        >will make one remark
        >
        >Jon: "Nevertheless, the particular sequence of:
        >(1) inclination/intention to do akusala, followed by
        >(2) kusala resolution not to do so
        >is one that everyone is familiar with, I'm sure. How would you
        >describe it?"
        >
        >Joop: You have explained that "inclination" in your vocubalaire
        >means "intention" and not - what I thought - something semi-permanent
        >as "tendency" and so has nothing to do with 'accumulations". In that
        >case I have only one problem: There is no need to use to two-step-
        >sequende, I prefer one step: Intention to do kusala.
        >So I am not everyone.
        >
        >

        It could also be stated in a 'one-step' formulation as 'the kusala
        resolution to refrain from akusala about to be done' (this also avoids
        the double-negative). As I said before, there is scope for the manner
        of expression.

        In the texts the different kinds of kusala are frequently treated
        separately, and it is sometimes useful to have terminology that
        distinguishes one kind from the others (the classic 3-fold division used
        in the suttas is dana, sila and bhavana).

        Jon
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