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Re: [DhammaStudyGroup] The corruptions of insight

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  • Jonothan Abbott
    Dan Interesting reading. Are the Ten Corruptions found in the texts? I would be interested to follow up. Thanks. Jon ... early stages of meditation practice,
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30 10:35 PM
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      Dan

      Interesting reading. Are the Ten Corruptions found in
      the texts? I would be interested to follow up.
      Thanks.

      Jon

      --- Dan Dalthorp <dhd5@...> wrote: > At the
      early stages of meditation practice, it is
      > very easy to confuse
      > the fruits of concentration with the fruits of
      > insight and to confuse
      > minor insights with major insights. Although such
      > confusion is bound
      > to arise to some degree or another, some of the
      > sting of the
      > confusion may be reduced by reviewing the
      > "corruptions of insight"
      > from time to time.
      >
      >
      >
      > The Ten Corruptions of Insight (Ven. Mahasi's
      > summary)
      >
      > When the meditator, in the exercise of noticing, is
      > able to keep
      > exclusively to the present body-and-mind process,
      > without looking back
      > to past processes or ahead to future ones, then,
      > as a result of insight, (the mental vision of) a
      > brilliant light will
      > appear to him. To one it will appear like the light
      > of a lamp, to
      > others like a flash of lightning, or like the
      > radiance of the
      > moon or the sun, and so on. With one it may last for
      > just one moment,
      > with others it may last longer.
      >
      > There will also arise in him strong mindfulness
      > pertaining to insight.
      > As a result, all the successive arisings of bodily
      > and mental
      > processes will present themselves to the
      > consciousness
      > engaged in noticing, as if coming to it of
      > themselves; and mindfulness
      > too seems as if alighting on the processes of
      > itself. Therefore the
      > meditator then believes: "There is no body-and-mind
      > process in which mindfulness fails to engage."
      >
      > His knowledge consisting in insight, here called
      > "noticing," will be
      > likewise keen, strong, and lucid. Consequently, he
      > will discern
      > clearly and in separate forms all the bodily and
      > mental
      > processes noticed, as if cutting to pieces a bamboo
      > sprout with a
      > well-sharpened knife. Therefore the meditator then
      > believes: "There is
      > no body-and-mind process that cannot be
      > noticed." When examining the characteristics of
      > impermanence, etc., or
      > other aspects of reality, he understands everything
      > quite clearly and
      > at once, and he believes it to be the knowledge
      > derived from direct experience.
      >
      > Further, strong faith pertaining to insight arises
      > in him. Under its
      > influence, the meditator's mind, when engaged in
      > noticing or thinking,
      > is serene and without any disturbance; and when he
      > is engaged in recollecting the virtues of the
      > Buddha, the Dhamma, and
      > the Sangha, his mind quite easily gives itself over
      > to them. There
      > arise in him the wish to proclaim the Buddha's
      > Teaching, joyous confidence in the virtues of those
      > engaged in
      > meditation, the desire to advise dear friends and
      > relatives to
      > practise meditation, grateful remembrance of the
      > help received
      > from his meditation master, his spiritual mentor,
      > etc. These and many
      > other similar mental processes will occur.
      >
      > There arises also rapture in its five grades,
      > beginning with minor
      > rapture. When purification of mind is gained, that
      > rapture begins to
      > appear by causing "goose-flesh," tremor in the
      > limbs, etc.; and now it produces a sublime feeling
      > of happiness and
      > exhilaration, filling the whole body with an
      > exceedingly sweet and
      > subtle thrill. Under its influence, he feels as if
      > the
      > whole body had risen up and remained in the air
      > without touching the
      > ground, or as if it were seated on an air cushion,
      > or as if it were
      > floating up and down.
      >
      > There arises tranquillity of mind with the
      > characteristic of
      > quietening the disturbances of consciousness and its
      > mental
      > concomitants; and along with it appear mental
      > agility, etc. When
      > walking, standing, sitting, or reclining there is,
      > under the influence
      > of these mental qualities, no disturbance of
      > consciousness and its
      > mental concomitants, nor heaviness, rigidity,
      > unwieldiness, sickness, or crookedness. Rather, his
      > consciousness and
      > its mental concomitants are tranquil through having
      > reached the
      > supreme relief in non-action. They are agile
      > in always functioning swiftly; they are pliant in
      > being able to attend
      > to any object desired; they are wieldy, in being
      > able to attend to an
      > object for any length of time desired; they are
      > quite
      > lucid through their proficiency, that is, through
      > the ease with which
      > insight penetrates the object; they are also
      > straight through being
      > directed, inclined, and turned only towards
      > wholesome
      > activities.
      >
      > There also arises a very sublime feeling of
      > happiness suffusing all
      > his body. Under its influence he becomes exceedingly
      > joyous and he
      > believes: "Now I am happy all the time," or "Now,
      > indeed, I have found happiness never felt before,"
      > and he wants to
      > tell others of his extraordinary experience. With
      > reference to that
      > rapture and happiness, which are aided by the
      > factors
      > of tranquillity, etc., it was said:
      >
      > Superhuman is the bliss of a monk
      > Who, with mind at peace,
      > Having entered a secluded place,
      > Wins insight into Dhamma.
      > When he fully comprehends
      > The five groups' rise and fall,
      > He wins to rapture and to joy --
      > The Deathless this, for those who understand.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dhammapada vv. 373-374
      >
      > There arises in him energy that is neither too lax
      > nor too tense but
      > is vigorous and acts evenly. For formerly his energy
      > was sometimes
      > lax, and so he was overpowered by sloth and
      > torpor; hence he could not notice keenly and
      > continuously the objects
      > as they became evident, and his understanding, too,
      > was not clear. And
      > at other times his energy was too tense, and
      > so he was overpowered by agitation, with the same
      > result of being
      > unable to notice keenly, etc. But now his energy is
      > neither too lax
      > nor too tense, but is vigorous and acts evenly; and
      > so,
      > overcoming these shortcomings of sloth, torpor, and
      > agitation, he is
      > able to notice the objects present keenly and
      > continuously, and his
      > understanding is quite clear, too.
      >
      > There also arises in him strong equanimity
      > associated with insight,
      > which is neutral towards all formations. Under its
      > influence he
      > regards with neutrality even his examination of the
      > nature
      > of these formations with respect to their being
      > impermanent, etc.; and
      > he is able to notice keenly and continuously the
      > bodily and mental
      > processes arising at the time. Then his activity of
      > noticing is carried on without effort, and proceeds,
      > as it were, of
      > itself. Also in adverting to the objects, there
      > arises in him strong
      > equanimity, by virtue of which his mind enters, as
      > it were,
      > quickly into the objects of advertence.
      >
      > There arises further a subtle attachment of a calm
      > nature that enjoys
      > the insight graced with the "brilliant light" and
      > the
      === message truncated ===


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    • dalthorp@orie.cornell.edu
      ... Visudhimagga in the chapter on vipassana-nyana ... ______________________________________________________________________ _ ...
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2001
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        > Interesting reading. Are the Ten Corruptions found in
        > the texts? I would be interested to follow up.
        > Thanks.
        Visudhimagga in the chapter on vipassana-nyana

        > --- Dan Dalthorp <dhd5@c...> wrote: > At the
        > early stages of meditation practice, it is
        > > very easy to confuse
        > > the fruits of concentration with the fruits of
        > > insight and to confuse
        > > minor insights with major insights. Although such
        > > confusion is bound
        > > to arise to some degree or another, some of the
        > > sting of the
        > > confusion may be reduced by reviewing the
        > > "corruptions of insight"
        > > from time to time.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The Ten Corruptions of Insight (Ven. Mahasi's
        > > summary)
        > >
        > > When the meditator, in the exercise of noticing, is
        > > able to keep
        > > exclusively to the present body-and-mind process,
        > > without looking back
        > > to past processes or ahead to future ones, then,
        > > as a result of insight, (the mental vision of) a
        > > brilliant light will
        > > appear to him. To one it will appear like the light
        > > of a lamp, to
        > > others like a flash of lightning, or like the
        > > radiance of the
        > > moon or the sun, and so on. With one it may last for
        > > just one moment,
        > > with others it may last longer.
        > >
        > > There will also arise in him strong mindfulness
        > > pertaining to insight.
        > > As a result, all the successive arisings of bodily
        > > and mental
        > > processes will present themselves to the
        > > consciousness
        > > engaged in noticing, as if coming to it of
        > > themselves; and mindfulness
        > > too seems as if alighting on the processes of
        > > itself. Therefore the
        > > meditator then believes: "There is no body-and-mind
        > > process in which mindfulness fails to engage."
        > >
        > > His knowledge consisting in insight, here called
        > > "noticing," will be
        > > likewise keen, strong, and lucid. Consequently, he
        > > will discern
        > > clearly and in separate forms all the bodily and
        > > mental
        > > processes noticed, as if cutting to pieces a bamboo
        > > sprout with a
        > > well-sharpened knife. Therefore the meditator then
        > > believes: "There is
        > > no body-and-mind process that cannot be
        > > noticed." When examining the characteristics of
        > > impermanence, etc., or
        > > other aspects of reality, he understands everything
        > > quite clearly and
        > > at once, and he believes it to be the knowledge
        > > derived from direct experience.
        > >
        > > Further, strong faith pertaining to insight arises
        > > in him. Under its
        > > influence, the meditator's mind, when engaged in
        > > noticing or thinking,
        > > is serene and without any disturbance; and when he
        > > is engaged in recollecting the virtues of the
        > > Buddha, the Dhamma, and
        > > the Sangha, his mind quite easily gives itself over
        > > to them. There
        > > arise in him the wish to proclaim the Buddha's
        > > Teaching, joyous confidence in the virtues of those
        > > engaged in
        > > meditation, the desire to advise dear friends and
        > > relatives to
        > > practise meditation, grateful remembrance of the
        > > help received
        > > from his meditation master, his spiritual mentor,
        > > etc. These and many
        > > other similar mental processes will occur.
        > >
        > > There arises also rapture in its five grades,
        > > beginning with minor
        > > rapture. When purification of mind is gained, that
        > > rapture begins to
        > > appear by causing "goose-flesh," tremor in the
        > > limbs, etc.; and now it produces a sublime feeling
        > > of happiness and
        > > exhilaration, filling the whole body with an
        > > exceedingly sweet and
        > > subtle thrill. Under its influence, he feels as if
        > > the
        > > whole body had risen up and remained in the air
        > > without touching the
        > > ground, or as if it were seated on an air cushion,
        > > or as if it were
        > > floating up and down.
        > >
        > > There arises tranquillity of mind with the
        > > characteristic of
        > > quietening the disturbances of consciousness and its
        > > mental
        > > concomitants; and along with it appear mental
        > > agility, etc. When
        > > walking, standing, sitting, or reclining there is,
        > > under the influence
        > > of these mental qualities, no disturbance of
        > > consciousness and its
        > > mental concomitants, nor heaviness, rigidity,
        > > unwieldiness, sickness, or crookedness. Rather, his
        > > consciousness and
        > > its mental concomitants are tranquil through having
        > > reached the
        > > supreme relief in non-action. They are agile
        > > in always functioning swiftly; they are pliant in
        > > being able to attend
        > > to any object desired; they are wieldy, in being
        > > able to attend to an
        > > object for any length of time desired; they are
        > > quite
        > > lucid through their proficiency, that is, through
        > > the ease with which
        > > insight penetrates the object; they are also
        > > straight through being
        > > directed, inclined, and turned only towards
        > > wholesome
        > > activities.
        > >
        > > There also arises a very sublime feeling of
        > > happiness suffusing all
        > > his body. Under its influence he becomes exceedingly
        > > joyous and he
        > > believes: "Now I am happy all the time," or "Now,
        > > indeed, I have found happiness never felt before,"
        > > and he wants to
        > > tell others of his extraordinary experience. With
        > > reference to that
        > > rapture and happiness, which are aided by the
        > > factors
        > > of tranquillity, etc., it was said:
        > >
        > > Superhuman is the bliss of a monk
        > > Who, with mind at peace,
        > > Having entered a secluded place,
        > > Wins insight into Dhamma.
        > > When he fully comprehends
        > > The five groups' rise and fall,
        > > He wins to rapture and to joy --
        > > The Deathless this, for those who understand.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Dhammapada vv. 373-374
        > >
        > > There arises in him energy that is neither too lax
        > > nor too tense but
        > > is vigorous and acts evenly. For formerly his energy
        > > was sometimes
        > > lax, and so he was overpowered by sloth and
        > > torpor; hence he could not notice keenly and
        > > continuously the objects
        > > as they became evident, and his understanding, too,
        > > was not clear. And
        > > at other times his energy was too tense, and
        > > so he was overpowered by agitation, with the same
        > > result of being
        > > unable to notice keenly, etc. But now his energy is
        > > neither too lax
        > > nor too tense, but is vigorous and acts evenly; and
        > > so,
        > > overcoming these shortcomings of sloth, torpor, and
        > > agitation, he is
        > > able to notice the objects present keenly and
        > > continuously, and his
        > > understanding is quite clear, too.
        > >
        > > There also arises in him strong equanimity
        > > associated with insight,
        > > which is neutral towards all formations. Under its
        > > influence he
        > > regards with neutrality even his examination of the
        > > nature
        > > of these formations with respect to their being
        > > impermanent, etc.; and
        > > he is able to notice keenly and continuously the
        > > bodily and mental
        > > processes arising at the time. Then his activity of
        > > noticing is carried on without effort, and proceeds,
        > > as it were, of
        > > itself. Also in adverting to the objects, there
        > > arises in him strong
        > > equanimity, by virtue of which his mind enters, as
        > > it were,
        > > quickly into the objects of advertence.
        > >
        > > There arises further a subtle attachment of a calm
        > > nature that enjoys
        > > the insight graced with the "brilliant light" and
        > > the
        > === message truncated ===
        >
        >
        >
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