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The Removal of Distracting Thoughts, no 2.

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  • nina van gorkom
    The Removal of Distracting Thoughts, no 2. The Co explains, when unwholesome thinking is accompanied by attachment, the different object (nimitta) he should
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 12, 2004
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      The Removal of Distracting Thoughts, no 2.

      The Co explains, when unwholesome thinking is accompanied by attachment, the
      different object (nimitta) he should pay attention to is foulness, asubha.
      And when there is attachment to things, such as robes, he should reflect on
      the impermanence of things. When thinking with aversion arises towards
      living beings he should develop metta, loving kindness. When thinking with
      aversion arises towards things he should pay attention to elements. When
      thinking with delusion arises the bhikkhu should depend on five dhammas.
      The Co. then gives further explanations. First the Co explains about
      foulness. When someone finds a hand or a leg of someone else beautiful he
      should develop the idea of the foulness of the body. To what is he attached?
      To hairs of the head, hairs of the body, to urine (the last mentioned of the
      thirtytwo parts of the body)? The Co mentions that the body has threehundred
      bones (see Vis. VIII, 101), bound by ninehundred sinews. What is unclean
      goes out by nine doors and ninetynine thousand pores, and it has a stench
      like a corpse. It is ugly and foul. When he develops the meditation on the
      thirtytwo parts of the body he will not find anything excellent in the body.
      In this way he can abandon lust that arises for living beings.
      If attachment to things such as bowl or robe arises, he should consider the
      fact that they have no owner and that they are not lasting, just as is
      stated in the explanation of Satipatthåna.
      N: Things such as bowl or robes are mere rupa dhammas that arise and fall
      away, they are impermanent and do not belong to anyone. The bhikkhu has to
      develop satipatthana all the time.
      The Co states that when he has anger towards living beings he should develop
      metta, as he can learn from the suttas, such as the Discourse on the Parable
      of the Saw (M.N. I, no 21). In that way he can abandon anger, and then
      metta is an object different from the object of aversion.
      When he has aversion towards things, when he knocks a table, a thorn, a
      sharp and pointed leaf, then he should consider the elements in this way:
      with whom are you angry? With the element of earth, of water etc.? Then he
      will abandon anger.
      N: By the development of vipassana he realizes that there are nama elements
      and rupa elements. What appears through touch is only hardness, temperature
      or motion.
      ****
      Nina.
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