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Re: Playing around with the past

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  • kenhowardau
    Hi Andrew and Christine, This brief conversation of yours must have touched a nerve; I keep thinking about it! ... A: When I first came to Buddhism, I was
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 2, 2004
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      Hi Andrew and Christine,

      This brief conversation of yours must have touched a nerve; I keep
      thinking about it!

      --------------
      A: > > When I first came to Buddhism, I was encouraged to develop
      metta and compassion towards "difficult" people by remembering that,
      in the past, they had shown great compassion towards me - indeed,
      they had even been my mother!
      > >

      C, quoting Mata Sutta: >
      < . . .>
      "A being who has not been your mother at one time in the past is not
      easy to find... A being who has not been your father... your
      brother... your sister... your son... your daughter at one time in
      the past is not easy to find.
      >
      -------------

      That's the inevitable conclusion when we consider the time we have
      spent in samsara: there is nothing new under the sun. All the
      possible relationships we've had with all those people! Yuck, it
      doesn't bear thinking about.

      --------------------
      M-sutta: > "Long have you thus experienced stress, experienced pain,
      experienced loss, swelling the cemeteries –
      ----------------------

      The only thing, we know for sure that we haven't experienced, is
      Path Consciousness.

      ------------------
      "enough to become disenchanted with all fabricated things, enough to
      become dispassionate, enough to be released."
      >
      -----------------

      Knowing that there is a way out makes contemplation of infinite
      samsara quite liberating, doesn't it? It reminds me of people who
      have had `near death experiences' only more so. It makes all
      conventional values meaningless and yet it makes the present moment
      incredibly meaningful.

      Kind regards,
      Ken H
    • gazita2002
      Dear Ken H, Hello; missed meeting up with you again last Cooran time, but maybe I can make the next one if I know well in advance when it is. I like your last
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 3, 2004
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        Dear Ken H,
        Hello; missed meeting up with you again last Cooran time,
        but maybe I can make the next one if I know well in advance when it
        is.
        I like your last statement here and want to add my '2 cents
        worth'...

        --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "kenhowardau"
        <kenhowardau@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Andrew and Christine,
        >
        > This brief conversation of yours must have touched a nerve; I keep
        > thinking about it!

        -snip-
        > The only thing, we know for sure that we haven't experienced, is
        > Path Consciousness.
        >

        ------------------
        > "enough to become disenchanted with all fabricated things, enough
        to
        > become dispassionate, enough to be released."
        > >
        > -----------------
        >
        > Knowing that there is a way out makes contemplation of infinite
        > samsara quite liberating, doesn't it? It reminds me of people who
        > have had `near death experiences' only more so. It makes all
        > conventional values meaningless and yet it makes the present moment
        > incredibly meaningful.
        >
        > Kind regards,
        > Ken H

        Its the last sentence about meaningless and meaningful that
        caught my eye. Recently lots of things other than dhamma, seem to
        have lost any substance for me, and I know that there are not that
        many kusala moments either, bec its often accompanied by unpleasant
        feeling. I'm guessing its attachment for listening, being with
        dhamma friends etc. that is the cause of dosa [besides my
        accumulations]. That for me is the meaningless bit.

        The meaningful is the fact that I've heard the dhamma and can
        understand, at least some of the time, that reality cannot
        be 'manipulated' to fit in with what I want, no matter how hard I try.
        so to accept this present moment for what it is, does take a large
        amount of patience, courage and good cheer and a degree of
        understanding.

        'We are never free of Abhidhamma. People who have never heard of
        it are not free of it; people who have heard but hate it are not
        free of Abhidhamma; people who love it but never follow it and vice
        versa, are never free of it!!'
        [from my notebook dated 8/3/2519 B.E.]

        Patience, courage and good cheer,
        Azita.
      • kenhowardau
        Hi Azita, ... Az: Hello; missed meeting up with you again last Cooran time, but maybe I can make the next one if I know well in advance when it is. ...
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 5, 2004
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          Hi Azita,

          ---------------
          Az: > Hello; missed meeting up with you again last Cooran time,
          but maybe I can make the next one if I know well in advance when it
          is.
          ----------

          Excellent! As you know, we can't set a date until we hear if, and
          when, Robert K is going to visit. But you will be the first to know.

          -------------------
          Az: > I like your last statement here and want to add my '2 cents
          worth'...
          -------------------

          Thanks, when I wrote it I liked the sound of it (quite pithy) but,
          increasingly, I realised that it was also very true.

          --------------------
          <snip>
          Az: > The meaningful is the fact that I've heard the dhamma and can
          understand, at least some of the time, that reality cannot
          be 'manipulated' to fit in with what I want, no matter how hard I
          try. so to accept this present moment for what it is, does take a
          large amount of patience, courage and good cheer and a degree of
          understanding.
          ----------------

          I see what you mean: wanting to stop wanting and trying to stop
          trying won't get us anywhere: we need understanding. In the
          meantime, p, c and g c.

          ------------------
          'We are never free of Abhidhamma. People who have never heard of
          it are not free of it; people who have heard but hate it are not
          free of Abhidhamma; people who love it but never follow it and vice
          versa, are never free of it!!'
          [from my notebook dated 8/3/2519 B.E.]

          -----------

          I'd like a copy of that notebook: a great source of pith AND
          substance. :-)

          Kind regards,
          Ken H
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