Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[dsg] Re: Video Games?

Expand Messages
  • buddhatrue
    Friend Sarah, Sarah: James, we agree that the only `true release or escape from samsara is the realisation of nibbana by the supramundane consciousness when
    Message 1 of 92 , Apr 30, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Friend Sarah,

      Sarah: James, we agree that the only `true release' or escape from
      samsara is the realisation of nibbana by the supramundane
      consciousness when defilements are eradicated. However, the path has
      to be developed and this can only be by way of gradually knowing
      present namas and rupas as anatta, i.e knowing material forms,
      feelings, perceptions, formations and consciousness for what they
      are - conditioned dhammas or elements. I agree with you that the
      idea of self is only finally eradicated at the first stage of
      enlightenment, but the insight can only ever begin to develop at the
      present moment.

      James: Okay, great, we agree here!! (BTW, I took a somewhat radical
      position in this post for a purpose: to pin you down to what is
      important. If I mention that knowing namas and rupas is somewhat
      important, but nibbana is more important, you will only focus on the
      first part, blow it completely out of proportion, and then my
      meaning would be lost. You have done this before! ;-)) To
      summarize, so that we are both on the same page: The goal of
      Buddhism is enlightenment, not knowing namas and rupas. Simply
      understanding namas from rupas in everyday life is still mundane
      knowledge. Knowing namas and rupas as anatta won't occur until
      enlightenment, which is of a supramundane consciousness.
      Additionally, this supramundane consciousness won't occur until the
      defilements are eradicated. Am I the only one to see the necessity
      for meditation practice to achieve this goal? (Don't answer that…I
      already know your answer! ;-)) One must purify the mind and this
      cannot be done (`that well'…I hate to give you even an inch! ;-)) in
      this midst of defilements. It would be like trying to dry your
      clothes in a rainstorm, it just can't be done. It is incorrect to
      say that meditation practice should not be practiced because of the
      idea of self because even the knowing of namas and rupas in the
      present moment has the idea of self present! Your approach reminds
      me of the Zen story of the master who wanted to teach his disciple
      how his approach to Buddhism was incorrect. The disciple came
      across his master looking around the floor inside his hut. The
      disciple asked his master what he was looking for and the master
      replied that he was looking for his keys. They both searched around
      the room, high and low, but couldn't find them. The disciple then
      asked the master if he was sure he had lost them in the hut, and the
      master replied, "No, actually, I lost them outside. But the light
      is better in here." The disciple was shocked and told his master
      that they should look for the keys outside, in the dark, where they
      had really been lost. The master replied, "Then why do you search
      for nibbana only where there is light and not where it has been
      lost?" The disciple then became enlightened.

      Metta, James
    • Michelle Vellin
      Thanks Rob and Jack, I m trying to do samatha of course. People said that anapanasati is the easiest object and the most basic object in meditation. Is it
      Message 92 of 92 , May 12 4:37 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Rob and Jack,

        I'm trying to do samatha of course. People said that
        anapanasati is the easiest object and the most basic
        object in meditation. Is it true?

        Or maybe I've chosen the wrong object for my mind?
        My problem is my mind always wandering most of the
        time, when I'm climbing the stairs or sitting in the
        lecture hall. And I find that it's very dangerous with
        the wandering mind in my case.

        Could someone suggest me another object or maybe
        anapanasati is the right object for me?

        Thanks






        > I think first you need to adjust your expectations
        > of what happens during
        > meditation. Accept wandering mind (monkey mind as
        > some Buddhists call it) as
        > normal. Your job is to gently bring your mind back
        > to the object of meditation. At
        > first this may happen many times every minute. If
        > you find yourself judging
        > yourself as you did in the paragraph above, gently
        > say to yourself, "judging
        > mind, judging mind" and bring your attention gently
        > back to your breath.
        > Your mind on its own will eventually spend more and
        > more time on the object
        > of meditation. Don't force anything. Be gentle. Be
        > mindful of everything that
        > happens.
        >
        > There is an old Chinese proverb. If you try to keep
        > a wild horse in a small
        > stall, he will rebel and kick at the walls. But,
        > keep the wild horse in a big
        > pasture and he will accept his situation peacefully.
        >
        >
        > jack
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        > dhammastudygroup-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >


        =====
        Regards,

        m_vellin




        __________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Movies - Buy advance tickets for 'Shrek 2'
        http://movies.yahoo.com/showtimes/movie?mid=1808405861
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.