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Re: [dsg] Re: Getting closer to Anatta

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  • Ray Hendrickson
    James says:. ... I am not aware of any survey. My comment about other Buddhist I have talked to online is based on my experience of chatting with folks in
    Message 1 of 43 , Nov 30, 2002
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      James says:.
      >
      > (I have yet to speak to any Buddhists who embrace the possibility of
      > a temporary self. Most I encounter say that there is no self,
      > temporary or otherwise. Actually, that is what you stated in the
      > post that inspired this post. Now I am confused as to where you
      > stand.)
      >
      > Probably not a majority who use this email group,
      > > but in general I have found it a popular approach.
      >
      > (Has a survey been conducted of the members of this group as to their
      > beliefs in anatta, dukkha, Abhiddhamma and karma? There are 260 some
      > odd members and we only hear from a handful; I have no idea what most
      > are thinking. How can you be so sure? Has there been a survey I
      > don't know about? If not, maybe one would be a good idea. This
      > group does have a 'Polls' feature.)
      >

      I am not aware of any survey. My comment about other Buddhist I have
      talked to online is based on my experience of chatting with folks in various
      Buddhist Chats, I help organize Buddhist Chats on AOL. My comment about
      this group is based on an assumption that those who study the Abhidhamma
      would be less prone to such a view. You are correct about my view of self,
      i.e.. no self temporary or otherwise.
    • chase8383 <dcwcc@webtv.net>
      Hi Rob You said it is after all a negative term, not a positive one; it points to the absence of a reality, not a thing that is a non-self . A simple
      Message 43 of 43 , Dec 8, 2002
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        Hi Rob

        You said "it is after all a negative term, not a positive one; it points
        to the absence of a reality, not a 'thing' that is a 'non-self'."

        A simple example would be a sweater. If you look at a sweater it looks like it has a self. But it doesn't. It is made up of wool, and that wool was processed by humans who than made the sweater. But when we look at the sweater we can't see the sheep or the workers who produced the sweater. So Buddhist negate the selfness of a sweater in order to reduce the tendency to see the world as an us vs. them existence. To negate the false perception of duality.

        Peace, David
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