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Re: Asubha of all conditioned realities

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  • sarah
    Dear Alex (& Phil), ... .... S: Whatever is taught in the Satipatthana Sutta concerns the development of satipatthana. Even whilst reflecting on the asubha of
    Message 1 of 157 , Apr 3, 2013
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      Dear Alex (& Phil),

      --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "truth_aerator" <truth_aerator@...> wrote:

      > >I heard Ajahn Sujin say that all conditioned realities have the aspect >of asubha. She said "I think the asubha of rising and falling away is >better than the dead body." I guess she might mean that for us there >is unlikely to be kusala reflection on the dead body...
      > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      >
      >A: For me, contemplation of death brought to seeking and eventually Dhamma.
      >
      > I have never seen asubha of instanteneous mental moments mentioned in the suttas. But asubha of dead and decaying human body, which is our certain future (unless one is cremated), was mentioned
      > in... satipatthana sutta.
      ....
      S: Whatever is taught in the Satipatthana Sutta concerns the development of satipatthana. Even whilst reflecting on the "asubha of dead and decayig human body", there can be understanding of realities, understanding of such realities as impermanent and asubha in the deepest sense.
      ...
      > Loss of momentary dhammas is not as bad as loss of the body which can last up to, approximately 80-120 years.
      ....
      S: What we learn is that there are only elements which are changing all the time. There is no lasting body or anything else. Each conditioned element is dukkha, anatta and asubha too.

      Metta

      Sarah

      http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an04/an04.049.olen.html

      Sensing no change in the changing, Sensing pleasure in suffering, Assuming "self" where there's no self, Sensing the un-lovely as lovely — Gone astray with wrong views, beings Mis-perceive with distorted minds. Bound in the bondage of Mara, Those people are far from safety. They're beings that go on flowing: Going again from death to birth. But when in the world of darkness Buddhas arise to make things bright, They present this profound teaching Which brings suffering to an end. When those with wisdom have heard this, They recuperate their right mind: They see change in what is changing, Suffering where there's suffering, "Non-self" in what is without self, They see the un-lovely as such. By this acceptance of right view, They overcome all suffering.
      ====
    • Robert E
      Hi Sarah. ... This makes sense of how such things are differentiated. ... Do you think the Buddha s point in the simile of the chariot is that there is no
      Message 157 of 157 , May 13, 2013
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        Hi Sarah.

        --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "sarah" <sarahprocterabbott@...> wrote:

        > S: It shows that there are just dhammas. Of course there are reasons, conditions why there is thinking now about 'computer' and not 'armchair', for example. Each visible object at each moment is different, each hardness experienced through bodysense is different.

        This makes sense of how such things are differentiated.

        > Nonetheless, there never is an experience of 'computer' or 'armchair', only of rupas experienced through the senses and thinking about these in different ways.

        Do you think the Buddha's point in the simile of the chariot is that there is no chariot at all?

        Best,
        Rob E.

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