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Re: [dsg] Re: Question about Mahayana.

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  • Vince
    ... I think this can be related with existence of the Time to us. The Time arises to us because we conceive a self in ourselves and in the objects in some
    Message 1 of 158 , Mar 5, 2013
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      Robert wrote:

      > It is equally ridiculous to talk about a momentary soul or self. And it is equally
      > ridiculous to say that if one says that there is no momentary identity, that there could
      > still be a non-momentary soul. Without identity, there is no soul or self. So that
      > distinction is also beside the point.
      >[...]
      > There is a momentary paramatha dhamma, but it doesn't have entity status, and is not
      > static. It is in process from arising to falling away and is constantly changing until
      > it no longer exists.

      I think this can be related with existence of the Time to us. The Time arises to us
      because we conceive a self in ourselves and in the objects in some degree. At all, the
      Time is just the belief of the possibility of the arising of one thing before another one.
      If every moment is linked with -self then we should be aware of the present moment

      Without any conception of -self. Is there arising of Time?


      Vince.
    • Robert E
      Hi Sarah. ... I continue to think this is a very zen approach to Dhamma - I think if you called it zen you d probably convert a bunch of Mahayanists, as it
      Message 158 of 158 , Apr 27, 2013
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        Hi Sarah.

        --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "sarah" <sarahprocterabbott@...> wrote:

        > S: Better to just talk about realities, paramattha dhammas that can be understood now. I think this is more productive than discussions about formal meditation.
        >
        > This morning at breakfast, another swimmer started asking me about retreats and meditation because of stress issues. I just started talking about 'now', about seeing now, hearing now, 'meditation' now, even in the noisy cafe. Otherwise, there's always a thinking about another time, another place, never any understanding or awareness now. She appreciated it!

        I continue to think this is a very "zen" approach to Dhamma - I think if you called it "zen" you'd probably convert a bunch of Mahayanists, as it is very appealing, and I agree really is the heart of becoming aware, which can only happen at this moment now.

        A favorite quote of mine is sort of analogous in its simplicity, from the avant-garde saxaphonist/bass clarinetist Eric Dolphy, now deceased: "Music, after it's over, it's gone in the air - you can never capture it again."

        Best,
        Rob E.

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