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Re: Visit Hanoi introduce Buddhist practices

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  • sarah
    Dear Annie, (Tam B & all Vietnamese friends), I m so glad you ve taken this plunge and joined DSG (this group)! You ve given a very honest introduction and
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 15, 2013
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      Dear Annie, (Tam B & all Vietnamese friends),

      I'm so glad you've taken this 'plunge' and joined DSG (this group)! You've given a very honest introduction and I'm sure our Vietnamese friends will be delighted to meet you and assist when you reach Hanoi!

      For others, as Annie has mentioned, we are good swimming (and breakfasting) friends and I appreciate her keen interest in understanding more about life *at this moment* and the real causes of all problems in life.

      --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "annieaqua" wrote:

      > I feel very stuck at the moment after just recently coming out of a 6 year relationship. I am feeling overwhelmed with sadness and grief and wonder how I will ever feel differently.
      ...
      S: Other friends here often express similar emotions. What we learn is that the cause of all such sadness and grief is attachment, clinging - especially to our own feelings.

      We also learn that nothing lasts at all - not even for an instant.
      ...
      >
      > I have decided I am going to do what I have wanted to do for years and visit South East Asia, especially Vietnam and would like to come to Hanoi at the end of March. I am interested in being introduced to Buddhism and learning about Buddhist practices.
      ...
      S: I know our Vietnamese friends (who will see your message) will be delighted to help introduce you to the Buddhist teachings and in the meantime. Please keep discussing all these topics here.

      You can just follow this thread in the beginning and ignore others which may seem too complicated or full of words that make no sense.

      We can introduce these terms one by one.
      ...
      >
      > I have much fear about this trip as I will be travelling on my own. I fear being lonely and not being about to manage my loneliness. I also know I have to be strong to attempt a trip like this and wonder if I can actually do it as I feel vulnerable at the moment. I find my anxieties often crippling and I would like to learn tools to manage it.
      ...
      S: As we discussed at breakfast, in truth, we are all alone, however we live - alone with our experiences of seeing, hearing, thinking and so on. The strength and 'tools' will come through more understanding of the different 'realities' of life.
      ...
      >
      > I am hoping this trip will give me inner strength and self confidence.
      >
      > Thank you for the opportunity to share my story.
      ...
      S: Thanks so much for sharing it, Annie. I know it took some courage to do so.

      I do hope many other friends will respond to your introduction too.

      Metta (which means 'loving-kindness' or 'good wishes')

      Sarah
      ======
    • Nina van Gorkom
      Dear Annie, ... N: As Sarah said, others feel similar emotions. I lost my husband in September after sixty years of marriage. I decided to take a trip to
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 15, 2013
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        Dear Annie,
        Op 15-feb-2013, om 7:57 heeft annieaqua het volgende geschreven:
        >
        > I feel very stuck at the moment after just recently coming out of a
        > 6 year relationship. I am feeling overwhelmed with sadness and
        > grief and wonder how I will ever feel differently.
        >
        -------
        N: As Sarah said, others feel similar emotions. I lost my husband in
        September after sixty years of marriage.
        I decided to take a trip to Thailand alone (I am almost 85) and I did.
        -------
        > A: I have much fear about this trip as I will be travelling on my
        > own. I fear being lonely and not being about to manage my
        > loneliness. I also know I have to be strong to attempt a trip like
        > this and wonder if I can actually do it as I feel vulnerable at the
        > moment. I find my anxieties often crippling and I would like to
        > learn tools to manage it.
        >
        -------
        N: My trip alone was just wonderful, I enjoyed it and before I had
        never thought so. Everything was so easy and I will join the trip in
        September from Thailand to Vietnam. It is a lovely group, you will
        enjoy their company. I got the taste of traveling now.
        The tools: constantly hearing from Acharn Sujin what is really
        important. Realities now, and not our own thinking of stories about
        the past, sad stories. Past is past, and now we learn to live in the
        present. I am in the process of writing about the trip and will post
        on dsg bit by bit. But I need time.
        ------
        Nina.

        >
      • Tam Bach
        Dear Annie, The majority of our group will be in Hanoi at the end of March, and will be happy to meet and spend some time with you. You can send me an e-mail
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 15, 2013
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          Dear Annie,

          The majority of our group will be in Hanoi at the end of March, and will be happy to meet and spend some time with you. You can send me an e-mail when you know which day you  will arrive to Hanoi, so that we can arrange some meeting together.


          A: I feel very stuck at the moment after just recently coming out of a 6 year relationship. I am feeling overwhelmed with sadness and grief and wonder how I will ever feel differently. 
          Tam B: Sadness and grief won't last, even though it might seem to be so overwhelming now. It is its nature to be not permanent. Do you notice even now, in a day, it is not all the time there? It is not you, so you can't tell it to go away, but it will go away when there's more understanding that it is something that arises by conditions, then fall away...It takes time for that understanding to grow, but there is for sure the possibility for it to grow. I think Nina's story is a good example of how greatly understanding can help...
          --------------------------
          A: I have decided I am going to do what I have wanted to do for years and visit South East Asia, especially Vietnam and would like to come to Hanoi at the end of March. I am interested in being introduced to Buddhism and learning about Buddhist practices. 
          Tam B:  Like Nina and Sarah have said, please keep up with the discussions on DSG, and listen to AS' audio. In Hanoi, we will be happy to share with you our understanding of the Dhamma on a personal life level too.
          ---------------------------

          A: I have much fear about this trip as I will be travelling on my own. I fear being lonely and not being about to manage my loneliness. I also know I have to be strong to attempt a trip like this and wonder if I can actually do it as I feel vulnerable at the moment. I find my anxieties often crippling and I would like to learn tools to manage it.

          I am hoping this trip will give me inner strength and self confidence.
          Tam B:  The trip, along with more discussions and listening might provide conditions for your understanding to grow. Understanding is always accompanied by strength and confidence. So I wish you all the best.


          With friendliness,
          Tam B




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jagkrit2012
          Dear Annie Welcome to Community, Annie. Here you can find a group of friend who love to discussion and share topics of realities. Even though the page called
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 16, 2013
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            Dear Annie

            Welcome to Community, Annie. Here you can find a group of friend who love to discussion and share topics of realities.

            Even though the page called dhamma study group but the dhamma of the Lord Buddha is only about realities or truths. And these realities are absolute realities, nothing is more real than these.

            In the conventional sense, we take a lot of things as if they are real. Books, computers, cars, houses etc. Cats, dogs, horses, fish etc. Mother, father, husband(s), wife(s), friends etc.

            But if you are interested to learn Buddhism and follow through, you might think again about those realities. The strong pole of conventional believing about realities staked deep into the ground will be shaken. The confidence of that believe will be reexamined and explicated thoroughly by not just philosophy, ideology or theory but with the righteous reason.

            Misbelieve or misunderstanding about realities is one factor which brings on "dhukka" (one type of it is suffering: sadness, grief, fearfulness, whatever is unpleasant feeling etc.)

            As your story shows that you are now experiencing them constantly, I hope that you're not trying to avoid them but instead learning and understanding them. Study some useful posts and recorded discussion in DSG web is one tool which can be used to understand your suffering right now.

            Best wish with your journey of life. Even at home or Vietnam or any where.

            Jagkrit
          • philip
            Hello Annie Welcome to the group. The Buddha said that to be born in the human realm is the greatest thing, because it s only in this realm that we experience
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 20, 2013
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              Hello Annie

              Welcome to the group.

              The Buddha said that to be born in the human realm is the greatest thing, because it's only in this realm that we experience a bewildering mixture of pleasant and unpleasant experiences. (In harsher realms, there is only misery, and in the heavenly realm of the "devas" there is only bliss.) So it is only in this human realm that we have the opportunity to develop liberating wisdom. Do you know how rare it is to be reborn in the human realm? The Buddha uses a wonderful metaphor of a blind sea turtle swimming in the great seas (maybe wearing a pink swim cap!) who just happens to surface through an opening in a yoke floating on those great expansive seas. That, says the Buddha, is as likely to happen as it is for us to be born in this human realm. And having been blessed (though past good kamma) with this human realm birth, to have the opportunity to come across the Buddha's teaching is even rarer. So you are, in fact, a very rare and blessed person. (Sounds elitist, but the truth is there is a bit of wholesome elitism built into Buddhism.) And you have had the added good fortune to come across it through Sarah, who is in my opinion one of the people in the whole wide world who best understands the Dhamma. (Please encourage her to write a book about how she explains Dhamma to people she comes across in her daily life.) As you may have gathered by now, the Dhamma as explained by our teacher, Sujin Boriharnwanaket, goes against the grain of the nice sounding but incorrect pop Buddhism taught around the world. (And by pop Buddhism, I include Dhamma taught by very famous and popular monks.) I disagree on one point with Sarah. She says that she would have been better off never coming across that pop Buddhism if she hadn't met Ajahn (means respected teacher) Sujin. I disagree with that. I think it is good that many people come across that pop Buddhism. It is incorrect (the practices it teaches are rooted in subtle greed for feeling good about life through subtle greed rooted meditation) but I think it makes a lot of people happy and helps them to stop doing the worst kind of bad things. But only the true Dhamma can lead to liberation rather than just getting further caught up in self and subtle greed the way pop Buddhism leads people to do. My opinion is that if people have the accumulated understanding from this and past lives, they will see through the holes in the false pop Buddhism and move closer to the true Dhamma, and if they don't, well, it just won't click. And that is fine. Maybe in the next lifetime.

              You see, after the Buddha had his awakening under the Bodhi tree, he was tempted to *not* teach, because he could see with his infinite wisdom that the way of the world went against the Dhamma. The way of the world is lobha, which means greed, in all its many forms, from subtle to gross. The Dhamma is very very deep. To even begin to understand it we have to understand that bhavana (mental development) cannot come when mind states are rooted in lobha (greed) and ditthi (the subtle belief that there is a self that can control mind states.) This means that bhavana must be very very very gradual and the eradication of defilements must be very very gradual. (The Buddha uses the great metaphor of the handle of a carpenter's tool. You don't notice at the end of a day of using it that the handle has worn away a little, but it has. The development of wisdom and corresponding eradication of defilements must be like that, that gradual. And that most definitely goes against the way of the world.

              Personally, I'm a meditator, but I consider it breath yoga. It has proven neuroological benefits, and I find if I meditate in the morning, I have more emotional...space or something like that during the day. I think this is a physiological/neurological phenomenon rather than anything to do with Dhamma, but I think *everyone* should meditate for their health, as long as they can recognize that it is invariably rooted in lobha (greed) for emotional and physical wellbeing. Meditators like to deny this by saying oh, no problem, I can see the greed when it arises! That reminds me of a man who claims he knows how to stay dry because he has successfully towelled off while standing on a small island of ice fast melting in the sun in the middle of the sea. We are in the middle of a sea of lobha (greed) and the only way to get on dry land is by the very gradual development of understanding of present realities. (Paramattha dhammas.)

              Again, you are very fortunate to have met Sarah. And to have a chance to meet A. Sujin and other good Dhamma friends in Hanoi in March.

              As for the relationship pain, join the club. Whether the pain comes from losing someone now, or losing someone later, we always lose our loved ones. The Buddha taught very effectively on this point. One day a woman came to him weeping because her son had died and pleaded with the Buddha to bring him back. The Buddha told her he would do so if she brought him a mustard seed from a house where no one in the family had died. Of course she couldn't find such a house, and learned that she was not alone in suffering loss. Anyways, Sarah will have already given you wise guidance, I'm sure.


              I haven't written like this in a while, I don't participate here much anymore. Anyways, maybe we'll have a chance to meet someday in Thailand or Australia.

              Phil


              --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "annieaqua" <annieandbelle@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear Community,
              >
              > My name is Annie and I am a friend of the beautiful Sarah who I swim with at Manly Beach, Sydney.
              >
              > I feel very stuck at the moment after just recently coming out of a 6 year relationship. I am feeling overwhelmed with sadness and grief and wonder how I will ever feel differently.
              >
              > I have decided I am going to do what I have wanted to do for years and visit South East Asia, especially Vietnam and would like to come to Hanoi at the end of March. I am interested in being introduced to Buddhism and learning about Buddhist practices.
              >
              > I have much fear about this trip as I will be travelling on my own. I fear being lonely and not being about to manage my loneliness. I also know I have to be strong to attempt a trip like this and wonder if I can actually do it as I feel vulnerable at the moment. I find my anxieties often crippling and I would like to learn tools to manage it.
              >
              > I am hoping this trip will give me inner strength and self confidence.
              >
              > Thank you for the opportunity to share my story.
              >
              > Annie
              >
            • annieaqua
              Thank you for the message Nina. I am encouraged to hear you have travelled on your own and love it. The past is the past I agree and it is just stories we
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 21, 2013
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                Thank you for the message Nina. I am encouraged to hear you have travelled on your own and love it. The past is the past I agree and it is just stories we tell ourselves. I am trying to challenge some of the beliefs I hold about my past and the type of person I believe I am. Being introduced to this group is of great value for me. I look forward to reading about your trip. Annie.

                --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, Nina van Gorkom <vangorko@...> wrote:
                >
                > Dear Annie,
                > Op 15-feb-2013, om 7:57 heeft annieaqua het volgende geschreven:
                > >
                > > I feel very stuck at the moment after just recently coming out of a
                > > 6 year relationship. I am feeling overwhelmed with sadness and
                > > grief and wonder how I will ever feel differently.
                > >
                > -------
                > N: As Sarah said, others feel similar emotions. I lost my husband in
                > September after sixty years of marriage.
                > I decided to take a trip to Thailand alone (I am almost 85) and I did.
                > -------
                <...>
              • annieaqua
                Dear Tam, Thank you for your kind offer to meet with the group in Hanoi. I now will be arriving on 11th April. I do hope we can meet up and I very much look
                Message 7 of 16 , Feb 21, 2013
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                  Dear Tam,
                  Thank you for your kind offer to meet with the group in Hanoi. I now will be arriving on 11th April. I do hope we can meet up and I very much look forward to it.
                  Annie.

                  --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, Tam Bach <tambach@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Annie,
                  >
                  > The majority of our group will be in Hanoi at the end of March, and will be happy to meet and spend some time with you. You can send me an e-mail when you know which day you  will arrive to Hanoi, so that we can arrange some meeting together.
                  <...>
                • annieaqua
                  Dear Jagkrit Thank you for your words. I do believe I am trying to avoid the unpleasant emotions and feelings that arise from the constant stories I am
                  Message 8 of 16 , Feb 21, 2013
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                    Dear Jagkrit
                    Thank you for your words. I do believe I am trying to avoid the unpleasant emotions and feelings that arise from the constant stories I am telling myself. Stories from my past, fears of the future. I shut down and "give up" rather than facing them. I am terribly hard on myself and know this is something I need to work on. I will look at the discussions and recordings on the DSG as you recommend. I am at the beginning of my journey I feel but am hopeful.
                    Annie.


                    --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "jagkrit2012" <jagkrit2012@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Annie
                    >
                    > Welcome to Community, Annie. Here you can find a group of friend who love to discussion and share topics of realities.
                    >
                    > Even though the page called dhamma study group but the dhamma of the Lord Buddha is only about realities or truths. And these realities are absolute realities, nothing is more real than these.
                    <...>
                  • annieaqua
                    Hello Phil Thank you for your enlightening words. Your explanations are really interesting and it has got me thinking about so many things. I love the turtle
                    Message 9 of 16 , Feb 22, 2013
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                      Hello Phil

                      Thank you for your enlightening words. Your explanations are really interesting and it has got me thinking about so many things. I love the turtle metaphor and picturing it with a pink cap. I am interested in the comparison to pop Buddhism and would like to understand this more. Also meditation and the reasons behind it. I would like to have some more time with Sarah and look forward to discussing some of the points you wrote about.

                      Annie


                      --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "philip" <philco777@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Hello Annie
                      >
                      > Welcome to the group.
                      >
                      > The Buddha said that to be born in the human realm is the greatest thing, because it's only in this realm that we experience a bewildering mixture of pleasant and unpleasant experiences. (In harsher realms, there is only misery, and in the heavenly realm of the "devas" there is only bliss.) So it is only in this human realm that we have the opportunity to develop liberating wisdom. Do you know how rare it is to be reborn in the human realm? The Buddha uses a wonderful metaphor of a blind sea turtle swimming in the great seas (maybe wearing a pink swim cap!) who just happens to surface through an opening in a yoke floating on those great expansive seas. That, says the Buddha, is as likely to happen as it is for us to be born in this human realm. And having been blessed (though past good kamma) with this human realm birth, to have the opportunity to come across the Buddha's teaching is even rarer.
                      <....>
                    • annieaqua
                      Dear Sarah Thank you for introducing me to the DSG. I receive the emails and most of them are a little over my head at this stage, however I am following some
                      Message 10 of 16 , Feb 22, 2013
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                        Dear Sarah

                        Thank you for introducing me to the DSG. I receive the emails and most of them are a little over my head at this stage, however I am following some and am interested in what you say about attachment to ones emotions and that nothing lasts for an instant. I also would like to explore the idea of we all being alone in our experiences, feelings, thoughts and the understanding of 'realities' in life.

                        I am very encouraged of the idea of meeting some group members in Hanoi and look forward to the opportunity.

                        Metta :)
                        Annie


                        --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "sarah" <sarahprocterabbott@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Dear Annie, (Tam B & all Vietnamese friends),
                        >
                        > I'm so glad you've taken this 'plunge' and joined DSG (this group)! You've given a very honest introduction and I'm sure our Vietnamese friends will be delighted to meet you and assist when you reach Hanoi!
                        <...>
                      • philip Coristine
                        Hi Annie I m glad you enjoyed the punk swim cap. Sarah shared a youtube clip of swimming friends sharing a bay with a giant whale, I seem to remember people
                        Message 11 of 16 , Feb 22, 2013
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                          Hi Annie

                          I'm glad you enjoyed the punk swim cap. Sarah shared a youtube clip of swimming friends sharing a bay with a giant whale, I seem to remember people wearing pink swim caps.

                          As a good introduction to the true Dhamma, I would recommend Nina's Buddhism in Daily Life, if it is still available, or for something a little tougher, her Abhidhamma in Daily Life, which is recognized around the world as one of the best primers on Abhidhamma, the Buddha's most profound teaching. (B in D L also contains lots of Abhidhamma.)

                          For pop Buddhism, my introduction came through Thich Nhat Hahn's "Heart of the Buddha's Teaching." Through that book (which is of the Mahayana tradition of East Asia, not the Theravada tradition whuch is discussed here) you can see both the emotional healing power and lobha rooted shortcomings of pop Buddhism. Reading collections of suttas (the Buddha's discourses) without an appreciation of Abhidhamma to help one grasp their subtlety is another very commmon way lobha works its way in popular Buddhism, as you will come to see if you hang around
                          (to be honest, most people don't) long enough....

                          Phil


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • sarah
                          Dear Annie, ... .... S: Just leave the messages that are over your head and ask questions about those topics of interest. Usually, most of the day, we cling
                          Message 12 of 16 , Feb 22, 2013
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                            Dear Annie,

                            --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "annieaqua" <annieandbelle@...> wrote:

                            > Thank you for introducing me to the DSG. I receive the emails and most of them are a little over my head at this stage, however I am following some and am interested in what you say about attachment to ones emotions and that nothing lasts for an instant.
                            ....
                            S: Just leave the messages that are "over your head" and ask questions about those topics of interest.

                            Usually, most of the day, we cling to our feelings and emotions. We'd all like to have pleasant feelings all the time, but any kind of feeling, whether pleasant or unpleasant or neutral, doesn't last at all.

                            So this means that the problem in life is not the lack of pleasant feelings or the amount of unpleasant feelings, but the clinging and strong attachment to ourselves and our feelings. We find ourselves very important and are taught that we should love and value ourselves more.

                            On the contrary, there is no shortage of self-love and the more self-love there is, the more unhappiness and disappointment when life doesn't turn out as we'd like it to.

                            And what is life? Actually, it's just moments of seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, touching and thinking about the objects experienced. Is the Self seeing? Is it hearing? Or is it just an illusion?

                            At any moments of understanding what life really is now, at any moments of consideration for others rather than self-love, there is no problem in life, no unhappiness at all.
                            ...

                            >I also would like to explore the idea of we all being alone in our experiences, feelings, thoughts and the understanding of 'realities' in life.
                            ...
                            S: Yes, no matter whether we live with a Partner or on our own, no matter whether we're in Hanoi or Australia with friends or not, we actually live alone with the present experience. At a moment of seeing what is visual and then thinking about it, there are just those experiences, no people in them at all.

                            In the Buddhist Teachings we learn that the partner in life is attachment and that this is the partner that causes all our problems. Sometimes we might think that our problems are caused by other people or jobs or situations of one kind or other, but actually, all the problems really come down to attachment and ignorance.

                            You mentioned difficulties many people face with anxiety and depression. We learn that these are kinds of aversion, not liking, not accepting life now as it is. No one likes such states because of the unpleasant feelings, but no one minds about the attachment and pleasant feelings which lead to the anxieties and depressions. So often, we find ourselves lost in the stories about past and future and just forget that now, the realities are simply the seeing of what is visual, the hearing of sounds and thinking about such experiences. The ideas thought about in our imagination are not real. This is why we look at the actual realities more and more.

                            There is a section in the 'files' (to be found on the home-page) called 'Useful Posts'. If you open this and click on 'n' and scroll down to "New", you will find specially kept messages from the archives for those new to DSG and new to Buddhism. Do take a look.

                            Also, if you click on this link:
                            http://www.dhammastudygroup.org/

                            then click on the audio, you will find some audio discussions with our teacher (often mentioned here) which I'd highly recommend.

                            Try going down to the secion:

                            'Editing in Progress'

                            and click on 'Poland' for example, as there are some good discussions for newcomers there.

                            I would recommend the following as a good introduction to Buddhism:
                            http://archive.org/details/TheBuddhasPath

                            You should be able to also find "Abhidhamma in Daily Life" at the same site which Phil recommended.

                            They are written by Nina who you have replied to here.

                            After Monday, let me know which day you can join me for breakfast and a chat and I'll also see if I have a suitable book to give/lend you.

                            Metta

                            Sarah

                            p.s. delighted that you'll also be visiting Hanoi and our good friends there who have a keen interest in the Dhamma. (The Dhamma refers to the teachings of the Buddha. Each time I write, I'll add one new Pali word. Pali is the language that the original Buddhist teachings were taught in.)
                            =====
                          • sarah
                            Dear Phil, Just to say that I think you wrote some very helpful comments to Annie and other newcomers here. ... ... S: Thanks for sharing your good writing
                            Message 13 of 16 , Feb 22, 2013
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                              Dear Phil,

                              Just to say that I think you wrote some very helpful comments to Annie and other newcomers here.

                              --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "philip" <philco777@...> wrote:

                              > The Buddha said that to be born in the human realm is the greatest thing, because it's only in this realm that we experience a bewildering mixture of pleasant and unpleasant experiences. (In harsher realms, there is only misery, and in the heavenly realm of the "devas" there is only bliss.) So it is only in this human realm that we have the opportunity to develop liberating wisdom. Do you know how rare it is to be reborn in the human realm? The Buddha uses a wonderful metaphor of a blind sea turtle swimming in the great seas (maybe wearing a pink swim cap!) who just happens to surface through an opening in a yoke floating on those great expansive seas.
                              ...

                              S: Thanks for sharing your good writing skills.

                              Did you listen to all the KK 2012 recordings?

                              Metta

                              Sarah

                              p.s. we just started on the Jan 2013 recordings, but basically had to halt them whilst entertaining my mother.
                              =====
                            • annieaqua
                              Dear Sarah Thank you for this. I feel I have much to explore now and no doubt will have some more questions soon. I appreciate you pointing me in the right
                              Message 14 of 16 , Feb 24, 2013
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                                Dear Sarah

                                Thank you for this. I feel I have much to explore now and no doubt will have some more questions soon.

                                I appreciate you pointing me in the right direction and have already started looking at some the files and links.

                                Annie

                                --- In dhammastudygroup@yahoogroups.com, "sarah" <sarahprocterabbott@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > S: Just leave the messages that are "over your head" and ask questions about those topics of interest.
                                >
                                > Usually, most of the day, we cling to our feelings and emotions. We'd all like to have pleasant feelings all the time, but any kind of feeling, whether pleasant or unpleasant or neutral, doesn't last at all.
                                >
                                > So this means that the problem in life is not the lack of pleasant feelings or the amount of unpleasant feelings, but the clinging and strong attachment to ourselves and our feelings. We find ourselves very important and are taught that we should love and value ourselves more.
                                >
                                > On the contrary, there is no shortage of self-love and the more self-love there is, the more unhappiness and disappointment when life doesn't turn out as we'd like it to.
                                <....>
                              • philip
                                Hi Sarah ... Demonstrating writing skills is ok in a sense when it is about basic conepts of Dhamma, but listening to a person who can help us to understand
                                Message 15 of 16 , Feb 25, 2013
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                                  Hi Sarah


                                  > S: Thanks for sharing your good writing skills.

                                  Demonstrating writing skills is ok in a sense when it is about basic conepts of Dhamma, but listening to a person who can help us to understand paramattha dhammas is infinitely more valuable. Annie is fortunate to be able to associate with you. If there are conditions for her to pay attention. (I don't mean that in a derogative way, Annie. It is just that very few people today have the accumulated conditions to listen patiently to the true Dhamma, so in the pursuit of pleasant results they go running after easy, self-supporting interpretations of suttas. This is not a matter of Annie, or Sarah, or Phil or anyone else. It is about paramattha dhammas performing functions in a way that is beyond our control. We have to understand that.)

                                  >
                                  > Did you listen to all the KK 2012 recordings?


                                  Not all of them yet. But I really like the exchange between Jessica and Ajahn at the beginning of the last session.


                                  Phil
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