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Vipaka is result of a deed?

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  • philip
    Dear Nina I have gone back to Abhidhamma in Daily Life. It seems Perfections has too many stories and situations for me right now, but I m sure I ll be back to
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2012
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      Dear Nina

      I have gone back to Abhidhamma in Daily Life. It seems Perfections has too many stories and situations for me right now, but I'm sure I'll be back to it later. Bev (who I haven't met) does a nice job reading ADL. Thank you Bev! I am also reading some passages onto my audio recorder to listen to later. I often tell my ESL students that they should listen to the audio version of their favourite book, if available, experiencing it through different doorways causes different understanding and appreciation. (I don't refer to "doorways" of course when I tell them!)


      A question. "Akusala vipaka is the result of an unwholesome deed." We hear that again and again. But today I wondered. Why do we say it is the result of a "deed", isn't it the result of a kamma?

      Indeed it would be better for me to think in terms of deeds. These days I (akusala cittas in this case) am underestimating the importance of convetional deeds, and am more interested in the dhammas behind them. That can be dangerous. I might try to justify bad deeds by thinking that there are good intentions (kusala cittas) behind them.

      Phil
    • Nina van Gorkom
      Dear Phil, ... N: We can use the word deed, but when we are more precise it is the cetanaa that motivates a deed. A bad deed is motivated by akusala cetanaa,
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 4, 2012
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        Dear Phil,
        Op 1-nov-2012, om 1:37 heeft philip het volgende geschreven:

        > A question. "Akusala vipaka is the result of an unwholesome deed."
        > We hear that again and again. But today I wondered. Why do we say
        > it is the result of a "deed", isn't it the result of a kamma?
        >
        > Indeed it would be better for me to think in terms of deeds. These
        > days I (akusala cittas in this case) am underestimating the
        > importance of convetional deeds, and am more interested in the
        > dhammas behind them. That can be dangerous. I might try to justify
        > bad deeds by thinking that there are good intentions (kusala
        > cittas) behind them.
        ------
        N: We can use the word deed, but when we are more precise it is the
        cetanaa that motivates a deed. A bad deed is motivated by akusala
        cetanaa, never by kusala cetanaa.
        ------
        Nina.



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