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Pilgrimage in India, Ch 4, 7

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  • Nina van Gorkom
    Dear friends, When we come to know realities as they are there will be more truthfulness in our life. When, for example, sound appears and there is mindfulness
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 7, 2012
      Dear friends,

      When we come to know realities as they are there will be more
      truthfulness in our life. When, for example, sound appears and there
      is mindfulness of sound as only a reality, we will know sound as it
      is. We will know hearing as it is, visible object as it is, seeing as
      it is. We shall have a clearer understanding of what our life really
      is: only n�ma and r�pa. When delusion about reality diminishes we
      shall be less inclined to delude ourselves and others.

      When the Bodhisatta was the elephant Chaddanta (Chandanta J�taka, no.
      51) he was pierced in the navel by a poisonous shaft, but he had no
      hate towards the hunter. When the hunter told him that he had been
      ordered to take his tusks for the queen of K�si, Chaddanta knelt
      down, cut off his own tusks and gave them to the hunter. After that
      he died.

      When the Bodhisatta was the Great Monkey he pulled a man out of a
      rocky chasm (J�taka no. 71). The man who was hungry and wanted to eat
      the monkey dashed a stone on his head. The monkey looked at him with
      eyes full of tears and warned him for the result of such a deed:

      �Oh act not so, good sir, or else

      The fate you reap will long deter

      All others from such deeds as this

      That you would do to me today.�

      The monkey felt no hate and wanted to help the man; regardless of his
      own pain he saw to it that the man reached his journey�s end in safety.

      The Buddha who had practised mett� without equal preached mett� to
      others. We read in the �Mett� Sutta� (Sutta-nip�ta vs. 143-152):

      �... May creatures all be of a blissfull heart.

      Let no one work another one�s undoing

      Or even slight him at all anywhere;

      And never let them wish each other ill

      Through provocation or resentful thought...�

      Venerable Dhammadharo related to us an example of mett�. A woman in
      Indonesia lost her husband because of the reckless driving of a young
      man. They caught the young man and brought him to her but she did not
      want to have him sent to court and even wished to pay for his
      education. This woman had mett� without limits.

      --------

      Nina.




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