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Pilgrimage in India, Ch 4, 6

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  • Nina van Gorkom
    Dear friends, He who discovered the truth all by himself and taught the truth to others had accumulated perfect truthfulness and sincerety. Through
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 5, 2012
      Dear friends,

      He who discovered the truth all by himself and taught the truth to
      others had accumulated perfect truthfulness and sincerety. Through
      satipa�tth�na one can become more sincere. When we are mindful of
      realities we will come to know our more subtle defilements which were
      hidden to us before. We may have thought that we were sincere so long
      as we did not tell lies. But are we always sincere in our speech and
      behaviour? The �Visuddhimagga� (I, 60 etc.) mentions untruthfulness
      in speech or deportment of monks by which there is transgression of
      the purity of right livelihood. For example, a monk lays claim to a
      higher than human state that is non-existent in order to obtain
      requisites [1]. This is an offence of �Defeat�; he can no longer be
      in communion with the Sangha. We read about hypocrisy in the case of
      a monk who wants to have requisites but rejects them because he wants
      to make a good impression on people so that they will give him more.
      We read about the monk who composes his deportment so that people
      will admire him more (Visuddhimagga Ch 1, 70):

      �... he walks studiedly, stands studiedly, sits studiedly, lies down
      studiedly; he walks as though concentrated; and he is one who
      meditates in public...�

      The monk is not supposed to ask for requisites and he is not allowed
      even to give a hint or make a suggestion about what he needs. The
      �Visuddhimagga� gives many examples of wrong speech of monks who are
      seeking requisites. A few of these examples are the following
      (Visuddhimagga Ch I, 75):

      �Ingratiating chatter is endearing chatter repeated again and again
      without regard to whether it is in conformity with truth and Dhamma.
      Flattery is speaking humbly, always maintaining an attitude of
      inferiority. Bean-soupery is resemblance to bean soup; for just as
      when beans are being cooked only a few do not get cooked, the rest
      get cooked, so too the person in whose speech only a little is true,
      the rest being false, is called a �bean soup�; his state is bean-
      soupery.�

      These passages are useful reminders also for lay-people. Are there
      moments we wish to pretend to be wiser and more virtuous than we
      really are? Is there some untruthfulness in our speech, be it only a
      little?

      ------

      1) The requisites of robes, food, dwelling-place and medicines.

      *******

      Nina.




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