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Re: Snowflakes

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  • Eric
    I once read that, if you consider all the trillions of snowflakes in the millions of snowstorms in this planet s history, yes, it s likely that two snowflakes
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 12, 2011
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      I once read that, if you consider all the trillions of snowflakes in the millions of snowstorms in this planet's history, yes, it's likely that two snowflakes formed identically....

      Regards,

      Eric


      --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, "Woody" <joecainjr@...> wrote:
      >
      > I get perturbed at my equilibrium sometimes! But, i like snow, when it's somewhere else. Specially NJ.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Michael Lecuyer <mjl@> wrote:
      > >
      > > The broader question is why are similar things like all galaxies, stars,
      > > trees, clouds, people and so on are not exactly the same.
      > >
      > > Self-organization systems, like snowflakes or galaxies, are influenced
      > > by sensitivity to initial conditions, efforts at self-similarity, and
      > > perturbed equilibrium among others.
      > >
      > > I offer a counter position: demonstrate that all conditions affecting a
      > > snowflake's growth could be repeated.
      > >
      > > Chaos theory might help answer your question. Fun stuff to think about.
      > > Most of us recall a short story 'A Sound of Thunder' by Ray Bradbury on
      > > time travel describing the Butterfly Effect.
      > >
      > > On 1/11/2011 11:04 AM, Don Surles wrote:
      > > > The question of the day:
      > > >
      > > > Since we have had a few snowflakes on the Peninsula this winter...here
      > > > is the question...
      > > >
      > > > Are all snowflakes really different?
      > > >
      > > > Your comments and answers are welcome.
      > > >
      > > > Don...
      > >
      >
    • Steven Long
      ... That approaches the number of stars in all the galaxies in the universe. Does that mean that there are two perfectly-matched stars out there somewhere?
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 12, 2011
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        On Jan 12, 2011, at 2:20 PM, Eric wrote:

        > I once read that, if you consider all the trillions of snowflakes in
        > the millions of snowstorms in this planet's history, yes, it's
        > likely that two snowflakes formed identically....
        >

        That approaches the number of stars in all the galaxies in the
        universe. Does that mean that there are two perfectly-matched stars
        out there somewhere?

        Steve
      • dnorton618@yahoo.com
        I doubt that two atoms are exactly alike. How could two snowflakes be alike? Doug N Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: Steven Long
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 12, 2011
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          I doubt that two atoms are exactly alike. How could two snowflakes be alike?

          Doug N

          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


          From: Steven Long <longsteven@...>
          Sender: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:27:15 -0500
          To: <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
          ReplyTo: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: Snowflakes

           

          On Jan 12, 2011, at 2:20 PM, Eric wrote:

          > I once read that, if you consider all the trillions of snowflakes in
          > the millions of snowstorms in this planet's history, yes, it's
          > likely that two snowflakes formed identically....
          >

          That approaches the number of stars in all the galaxies in the
          universe. Does that mean that there are two perfectly-matched stars
          out there somewhere?

          Steve

        • Paul Riley
          To answer Doug Below:   It depends on how close you look..   Atoms have isotopes and charges, so yes, they differ.   Stars that appear similar may have
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 13, 2011
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            To answer Doug Below:
             
            It depends on how close you look..
             
            Atoms have isotopes and charges, so yes, they differ.
             
            Stars that appear similar may have different elemental composition.
             
            Can two snowflakes, created under similar, but different, weather conditions be identical?
             
            Can 2 people have the same winning numbers for the Mega Millions?
             
            Can it warm up outside?
             
            These are tuff questions....
            Pj
            --- On Wed, 1/12/11, dnorton618@... <dnorton618@...> wrote:

            From: dnorton618@... <dnorton618@...>
            Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: Snowflakes
            To: "Delmarva Stargazers" <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 2:50 PM

             
            I doubt that two atoms are exactly alike. How could two snowflakes be alike?

            Doug N

            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

            From: Steven Long <longsteven@...>
            Sender: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:27:15 -0500
            To: <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
            ReplyTo: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: Snowflakes

             
            On Jan 12, 2011, at 2:20 PM, Eric wrote:

            > I once read that, if you consider all the trillions of snowflakes in
            > the millions of snowstorms in this planet's history, yes, it's
            > likely that two snowflakes formed identically....
            >

            That approaches the number of stars in all the galaxies in the
            universe. Does that mean that there are two perfectly-matched stars
            out there somewhere?

            Steve


          • Don Surles
            maybe we should ask if all the hairs on a hound s back are different or alike...how about the scales on a fish (they will all stink under a hot sun...).
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 13, 2011
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              maybe we should ask if all the hairs on a hound's back are different or alike...how about the scales on a fish (they will all stink under a hot sun...).

              comments?

              Don...


              Jan 13, 2011 09:40:37 AM, delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com wrote:

              ===========================================















               











              To answer Doug Below:
               
              It depends on how close you look..
               
              Atoms have isotopes and charges, so yes, they differ.
               
              Stars that appear similar may have different elemental composition.
               
              Can two snowflakes, created under similar, but different, weather conditions be identical?
               
              Can 2 people have the same winning numbers for the Mega Millions?
               
              Can it warm up outside?
               
              These are tuff questions....

              Pj
              --- On Wed, 1/12/11, dnorton618@... wrote:


              From: dnorton618@...
              Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: Snowflakes
              To: "Delmarva Stargazers"
              Date: Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 2:50 PM


               

              I doubt that two atoms are exactly alike. How could two snowflakes be alike?

              Doug N


              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


              From: Steven Long
              Sender: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:27:15 -0500
              To:
              ReplyTo: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Re: Snowflakes

               

              On Jan 12, 2011, at 2:20 PM, Eric wrote:

              > I once read that, if you consider all the trillions of snowflakes in
              > the millions of snowstorms in this planet's history, yes, it's
              > likely that two snowflakes formed identically....
              >

              That approaches the number of stars in all the galaxies in the
              universe. Does that mean that there are two perfectly-matched stars
              out there somewhere?

              Steve
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