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Venus last night

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  • lance biechele
    HI Folks,    I m a member of the group, and I was also looking at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6 reflector with 1400 mm FL.    Problems
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 4 10:06 AM
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      HI Folks,
         I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
      at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
      with 1400 mm FL.
         Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
      80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
      with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
         What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
      Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
      me enjoy scope.
      With alll Best Regards,
      Lance

    • Karen Jennings
      Hi, It was around 8pm when Chuck viewed Venus. Chuck likes to observe Venus before it gets dark and becomes too bright. Chuck used a 16 reflector, 14mm EP, no
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 4 10:36 AM
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        Hi,
         
        It was around 8pm when Chuck viewed Venus. Chuck likes to observe Venus before it gets dark and becomes too bright. Chuck used a 16" reflector, 14mm EP, no filters.
         
        Warmly Yours,
        Karen
         
         
         


         
        "When a child hearkens to the beat of a different drum ~ perhaps he is keeping time to songs of Angels that we, his lessers, simply cannot hear. ~Kelly Long-Kirkpatrick"
         



         

        To: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
        CC: karen-jennings@...
        From: ltb0076@...
        Date: Sun, 4 Jul 2010 10:06:37 -0700
        Subject: [delmarvastargazers] Venus last night

         
        HI Folks,
           I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
        at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
        with 1400 mm FL.
           Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
        80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
        with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
           What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
        Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
        me enjoy scope.
        With alll Best Regards,
        Lance




        The New Busy think 9 to 5 is a cute idea. Combine multiple calendars with Hotmail. Get busy.
      • dnorton618@yahoo.com
        Lance, Try to find Venus before the sun sets. Venus is too bright to observe in a dark sky. All of my observations of Venus have been way before the sun sets.
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 4 10:37 AM
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          Lance,

          Try to find Venus before the sun sets. Venus is too bright to observe in a dark sky. All of my observations of Venus have been way before the sun sets. This allows you to see Venus without it being a huge overblown beam of light.

          I typically used magnifications of 222x but 154x was pretty decent if I was observing with the sun still in the sky or close to setting.

          Hope this helps. Chuck... What have you been doing for your Venus observations?

          Doug N

          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


          From: lance biechele <ltb0076@...>
          Sender: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sun, 4 Jul 2010 10:06:37 -0700 (PDT)
          To: <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
          ReplyTo: delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: <karen-jennings@...>
          Subject: [delmarvastargazers] Venus last night

           

          HI Folks,
             I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
          at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
          with 1400 mm FL.
             Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
          80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
          with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
             What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
          Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
          me enjoy scope.
          With alll Best Regards,
          Lance

        • Chuck Jennings
          I always observer Venus before the sun sets.  It cuts down on the brightness significantly and it s usually better seeing as Venus is higher in the sky.  I
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 4 10:56 AM
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            I always observer Venus before the sun sets.  It cuts down on the brightness significantly and it's usually better seeing as Venus is higher in the sky.  I usually start at 130x, then to 266x, and will occasionally go to 365x if the seeing is good.  I typically don't use filters, but have used blue and yellow with minimal results. 
             
            - Chuck


            From: "dnorton618@..." <dnorton618@...>
            To: Delmarva Stargazers <delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sun, July 4, 2010 1:37:25 PM
            Subject: Re: [delmarvastargazers] Venus last night

             

            Lance,

            Try to find Venus before the sun sets. Venus is too bright to observe in a dark sky. All of my observations of Venus have been way before the sun sets. This allows you to see Venus without it being a huge overblown beam of light.

            I typically used magnifications of 222x but 154x was pretty decent if I was observing with the sun still in the sky or close to setting.

            Hope this helps. Chuck... What have you been doing for your Venus observations?

            Doug N

            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


            From: lance biechele <ltb0076@yahoo. com>
            Sender: delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Sun, 4 Jul 2010 10:06:37 -0700 (PDT)
            To: <delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com>
            ReplyTo: delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com
            Cc: <karen-jennings@ hotmail.com>
            Subject: [delmarvastargazers ] Venus last night

             

            HI Folks,
               I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
            at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
            with 1400 mm FL.
               Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
            80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
            with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
               What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
            Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
            me enjoy scope.
            With alll Best Regards,
            Lance


          • truittjs
            Hi Lance Everyone is right, the best time to view Venus is before the Sun goes down. This requires that you know where it s at in the sky. It is the first
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 4 11:34 AM
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              Hi Lance
              Everyone is right, the best time to view Venus is before the Sun goes down. This requires that you know where it's at in the sky. It is the first thing you'll see appear before the Sun has set. Of course a Goto can find it before your eyes can see it. We have looked at it in the day time at star parties, pretty cool.

              However, if you are showing other people and it is dark may I suggest a polarizing filter. These are most often used to look at the Moon but will also work with Venus. They're cheap and easy to get.

              When I do public events and show Venus I always make a point of telling them about the historical significance of it crescent shape. Once Galileo's telescope revealed that Venus was always in a phase there could be only one explanation. Venus had an orbit interior to us. Hey, the Earth can't be the center of the universe.

              Jerry

              --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, lance biechele <ltb0076@...> wrote:
              >
              > HI Folks,
              >    I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
              > at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
              > with 1400 mm FL.
              >    Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
              > 80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
              > with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
              >    What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
              > Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
              > me enjoy scope.
              > With alll Best Regards,
              > Lance
              >
            • Don Surles
              don t discount an off-axis mask to view bright objects. they provide increased focal ratio and decreased light, both serve to improve the image. example...my
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 4 12:02 PM
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                don't discount an off-axis mask to view bright objects.  they provide increased focal ratio and decreased light, both serve to improve the image.

                example...my favorite scope is also my least expensive scope...an old Coulter 17.5"er F4.5.  These scopes are not known for high quality optics or construction - they are known as "lightbuckets" and as such do a respectable job on deep sky objects vs higher quality but smaller aperture scopes.  when I need to split double stars or look at a bright planet -  out comes the off axis mask.  I have one that provides unobstructed apertures of 8, 6, 5, and 3 inches - all one unit.  imagine diffraction rings around each of the 4 stars in the Double Double with an 20 year old Coulter.

                another way to view Venus is with an un-aluminized primary mirror...you would be surprised at the contrast and clarity an un-aluminized mirror can deliver...you will never see the moon or venus any better.

                Don...


                On Jul 4, 2010, at 2:34 PM, truittjs wrote:

                 

                Hi Lance
                Everyone is right, the best time to view Venus is before the Sun goes down. This requires that you know where it's at in the sky. It is the first thing you'll see appear before the Sun has set. Of course a Goto can find it before your eyes can see it. We have looked at it in the day time at star parties, pretty cool.

                However, if you are showing other people and it is dark may I suggest a polarizing filter. These are most often used to look at the Moon but will also work with Venus. They're cheap and easy to get.

                When I do public events and show Venus I always make a point of telling them about the historical significance of it crescent shape. Once Galileo's telescope revealed that Venus was always in a phase there could be only one explanation. Venus had an orbit interior to us. Hey, the Earth can't be the center of the universe.

                Jerry

                --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, lance biechele <ltb0076@...> wrote:
                >
                > HI Folks,
                >    I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
                > at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
                > with 1400 mm FL.
                >    Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
                > 80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
                > with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
                >    What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
                > Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
                > me enjoy scope.
                > With alll Best Regards,
                > Lance
                >


              • Douglas L. Hemmick
                At present, Venus presents a disk of just 16 arc seconds in angular size, and it does not yet show the crescent phase. (The disk is 68% illuminated) But this
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 4 1:34 PM
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                  At present, Venus presents a disk of just 16 arc seconds in angular size, and it does not yet show the "crescent" phase. (The disk is 68% illuminated)

                  But this situation will begin to change, so that by Sept 1, the disk will be as large as 29 arc sec, and the crescent phase will be getting under way... (48% illumination)

                  My name is Doug and like Lance, I am also in Salisbury area, for what its worth.

                  Don Surles wrote:
                   

                  don't discount an off-axis mask to view bright objects.  they provide increased focal ratio and decreased light, both serve to improve the image.


                  example...my favorite scope is also my least expensive scope...an old Coulter 17.5"er F4.5.  These scopes are not known for high quality optics or construction - they are known as "lightbuckets" and as such do a respectable job on deep sky objects vs higher quality but smaller aperture scopes.  when I need to split double stars or look at a bright planet -  out comes the off axis mask.  I have one that provides unobstructed apertures of 8, 6, 5, and 3 inches - all one unit.  imagine diffraction rings around each of the 4 stars in the Double Double with an 20 year old Coulter.

                  another way to view Venus is with an un-aluminized primary mirror...you would be surprised at the contrast and clarity an un-aluminized mirror can deliver...you will never see the moon or venus any better.

                  Don...


                  On Jul 4, 2010, at 2:34 PM, truittjs wrote:

                   

                  Hi Lance
                  Everyone is right, the best time to view Venus is before the Sun goes down. This requires that you know where it's at in the sky. It is the first thing you'll see appear before the Sun has set. Of course a Goto can find it before your eyes can see it. We have looked at it in the day time at star parties, pretty cool.

                  However, if you are showing other people and it is dark may I suggest a polarizing filter. These are most often used to look at the Moon but will also work with Venus. They're cheap and easy to get.

                  When I do public events and show Venus I always make a point of telling them about the historical significance of it crescent shape. Once Galileo's telescope revealed that Venus was always in a phase there could be only one explanation. Venus had an orbit interior to us. Hey, the Earth can't be the center of the universe.

                  Jerry

                  --- In delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com, lance biechele <ltb0076@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > HI Folks,
                  >    I'm a member of the group, and I was also looking
                  > at Venus here in the Salisbury area.  I have a 6" reflector
                  > with 1400 mm FL.
                  >    Problems with Venus last night  - way too bright - used
                  > 80a blue filter without success!   Best power was 25mm
                  > with barlow for 112X.  Still incredibly small!
                  >    What scope was Chuck using - also filters?
                  > Thanks so much for any help you you can offer to help
                  > me enjoy scope.
                  > With alll Best Regards,
                  > Lance
                  >



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