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The loss of a master

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  • Bob Bunge
    I think most people know when they meet someone who is a master of their chosen field. One such person I had the honor to know was Richard Dick Wessling of
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 18, 2010
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      I think most people know when they meet someone who is a master of their
      chosen field. One such person I had the honor to know was Richard
      "Dick" Wessling of Milford, Ohio. Dick was a master of glass. His
      quiet, but important contributions to our hobby are little known, but
      important none-the-less.

      We all lost Dick to a stroke Wednesday morning.

      For many years Dick worked as a professional optician at 3M Precision
      Optics. But I knew him as an amateur. In the 1980's he authored a
      number of articles in various magazines about tri-schiefspiegler
      telescopes. Tri-schief's are an un-obstructed three mirror reflecting
      telescope often most used for high resolution planetary observing.

      But, in my opinion, Dick's biggest contribution to the hobby was related
      to large aperture dobsonian telescopes. When the first commercially
      available dobs became available in the early 1980's it was assumed their
      optical quality was good to poor. Starting in the mid-1980's a
      combination of things came together to drop the Astrofest star party,
      held south of Chicago, as a hotbed of next generation large aperture
      dobson evolution. Refinement of the truss tube design, large bearing
      surfaces, quick release clamps, wheel barrow handles and other tweaks
      all came together at Astrofest. Within a couple of years, the first
      Obsession telescope was displayed at Astrofest.

      But in the middle of this, Dick, not satisfied with what he saw through
      these telescopes, quietly started to work with a few owners to refigure
      a number of 17 and 20-inch mirrors. Dick's skill and attention to
      detail quickly convinced many that it was certainly possible for large
      dobsonian telescopes to have high quality optics and world class views.
      In a matter of a couple of years, this became accepted and consumers
      put pressure on manufacturers of these telescopes to provide them with
      high quality optics.

      So today, many of us large dob owners live with the legacy of Dick Wessling.

      RIP, Dick.

      Bob Bunge
    • jpr1608
      Thanks Bob for letting us know about the important contributions of Richard Wessling.. Jean-Paul
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 19, 2010
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        Thanks Bob for letting us know about the important
        contributions of Richard Wessling..
        Jean-Paul

        --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Bob Bunge <bbunge@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I think most people know when they meet someone who is a master of their
        > chosen field. One such person I had the honor to know was Richard
        > "Dick" Wessling of Milford, Ohio. Dick was a master of glass. His
        > quiet, but important contributions to our hobby are little known, but
        > important none-the-less.
        >
        > We all lost Dick to a stroke Wednesday morning.
        >
        > For many years Dick worked as a professional optician at 3M Precision
        > Optics. But I knew him as an amateur. In the 1980's he authored a
        > number of articles in various magazines about tri-schiefspiegler
        > telescopes. Tri-schief's are an un-obstructed three mirror reflecting
        > telescope often most used for high resolution planetary observing.
        >
        > But, in my opinion, Dick's biggest contribution to the hobby was related
        > to large aperture dobsonian telescopes. When the first commercially
        > available dobs became available in the early 1980's it was assumed their
        > optical quality was good to poor. Starting in the mid-1980's a
        > combination of things came together to drop the Astrofest star party,
        > held south of Chicago, as a hotbed of next generation large aperture
        > dobson evolution. Refinement of the truss tube design, large bearing
        > surfaces, quick release clamps, wheel barrow handles and other tweaks
        > all came together at Astrofest. Within a couple of years, the first
        > Obsession telescope was displayed at Astrofest.
        >
        > But in the middle of this, Dick, not satisfied with what he saw through
        > these telescopes, quietly started to work with a few owners to refigure
        > a number of 17 and 20-inch mirrors. Dick's skill and attention to
        > detail quickly convinced many that it was certainly possible for large
        > dobsonian telescopes to have high quality optics and world class views.
        > In a matter of a couple of years, this became accepted and consumers
        > put pressure on manufacturers of these telescopes to provide them with
        > high quality optics.
        >
        > So today, many of us large dob owners live with the legacy of Dick Wessling.
        >
        > RIP, Dick.
        >
        > Bob Bunge
        >
      • Michael Lecuyer
        The sun has been putting on a great display for the last few days. The remnants of a really large prominence are still on the western edge. More prominences
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 19, 2010
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          The sun has been putting on a great display for the last few days.

          The remnants of a really large prominence are still on the western edge.
          More prominences are showing up on the eastern edge with several
          filaments scattered around (prominences on the solar surface).

          There are some active regions probably related to sunspots (hard to tell
          if they're sunspots in a Ha scope).
        • Michael Lecuyer
          Today there is a large loop prominence at the north pole. There are three large filaments, a large active region around one of the two sunspot groups and
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 1 8:52 AM
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            Today there is a large loop prominence at the north pole. There are
            three large filaments, a large active region around one of the two
            sunspot groups and miscellaneous small prominences.
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