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  • Charles Wood Jr.(CJ)
    Oh how refreshing tonight was! With the bad weather and working 2 jobs, It s been real hard for me to get outside for a good night. The 14.5 has only made a
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 18, 2009
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      Oh how refreshing tonight was! With the bad weather and working 2 jobs, It's been real hard for me to get outside for a good night. The 14.5" has only made a few trips out this year. Tonight was a spectacular night at the Tuckahoe ballfield. The total attendance tonight was...

      Don - 25" Obsession
      Bob - 20" F/6
      Patrick - 10" Intelli
      Hunter - 12" Lightbridge
      Ralph - 8" LX90
      Dough - C8

      Jean Paul was there with his small refractor aswell, I didn't take a good look at it to see what it was. I think I heard Martha accross the field but I don't think she brought the 14" Tscope as usual.

      Tonight the transparency was excellent, The best I've seen it all year. Seeing was so-so but manageable. During steady periods, Powers were accepted up to 250x. For the first time since the beginning of time, There was NO DEW at tuckahoe which very unusual. We all know the famous "Tuckahoe Fog". Dew was a shocking 20% when I left the house at 6pm and 70% when Hunter and I came back at 2:30am. Tonight I logged 15 new galaxies and 4 new planetary nebulas. I'm only posting my notes for each object rather then all the info from Skytools(gets overwhelming after a few logs!).

      Planetary Nebulas-
      Abell 35: Very large, difficult PN. It only appears as a subtle glow from the background. Brightest around 2 stars. The nebulosity looks near oval around the 2 stars. Around the oval glow I can see some very faint extensions. There seems to a piece of nebulosity above the main patch that's separeted by a dark gap. Only time when the nebulosity of the nebula is easily detectable is when I move the scope side to side to swing it though the FOV. You can see the background go from being dark to light. It was easier to see with an Orion Ultrablock filter then an OIII because of less light loss with still a strong transmission.

      Abell 36: I observed this earlier but got sidetracked and forgot to log it. Nebula is large and surprisenly bright. No squinting needed like Abell 35 I observed earlier. A36 responded well to both the ultrablock and OIII but the OIII was slightly better. Central star was really bright, Even visible with a nebula filter. The nebulosity was easier on the left hand side. It appeared as an arc shape. With avertered vision there's an elongated glow visible all around the central star.

      NGC6072: This planetary is so far down I have to observe it on my knees! Pretty big, Faint unfiltered being so low in the south. Responds great to both the ultrablock and OIII but slightly better with the OIII. Annular with elongation, like a racetrack shape. There's faint extensions visible on the sides.

      NGC6153: Oh gosh, How did I manage to find this. It's so low to the horizon that I'm sitting in "frog" position. With an OIII filter I can see this very bright plantary through the trees here in the ballfield. Odd thing is, I found it first shot. Hunter thought it was hilarious. The glimpse I seen from this I noticed it was slightly elongated. Don't make me try this again...

      Galaxies-
      NGC2274: Small, fairly bright. Looks similar to a PN with the embedded 10th magnitude star. NGC2275 lies just below.

      NGC2275: Faint, low surface, small. Lies underneath brighter NGC2274.

      NGC2350: Very small galaxy. Looks very depressing at 92x because of it's size. Bumping the power up to 201x made the view much better. Fairly bright, high surface for it's magnitude. The 11.5 magnitude star involved is stellar.

      NGC2410: Very small edge on galaxy. Paper thin. Easily detectable at 92x but better seen with higher power. Surface is high in the center but quickly fades out. Fascinating to see a galaxy right next to Castor.

      NGC2435: Wow it's insane how bright this small galaxy is compared to it's real magnitude. The surface brightness is real high. Most likely cause of this is the star that's involved, which I've caught a few stellar glimpses of it at 201x. What's neat is that it forms a "wishbone" shape with the group of stars in the FOV.

      NGC2470: Small and bright, elongated. Surface brightness is high, estimate about 12th magnitude. Sits inside a bright square asterism of stars. It sits on the 8th magitude stars thats on the bottom left.

      NGC2480: Very difficult. Hard to hold steady. Just when you think you got it in arms reach it goes out again. I can only glimpse it at 330x. Sits next to NGC2481.

      NGC2481: Bright and small elongated edge on galaxy. Slightly brighter in the center. At high power I can suspect some detail. Sits next to a really cool asterism that looks just like a smiley face.

      NGC2862: Did you think the Silver Needle galaxy is thin? Then you must of never seen this galaxy. My oh my it's one of the thinest edge on galaxies I have ever seen. Surface is bright in the center but difficult to see it elsewise since it's so thin. The edges come in and out of view. A bright 8.6 magnitude star sits just above the galaxy.

      NGC2942: Small and elongated. Faint with a pretty low surface. Slightly brighter in the center.

      NGC3049: Fairly small, faint, and elongated. Steady and bright with averted vision.

      NGC3270: Fairly small bright edge on galaxy with pretty high surface. Surface is mostly even, Slightly brighter in the middle. Elongated. The asteroid Ceres is in the same FOV tonight.

      NGC4085: Logged once before but no detail written due to a dead laptop battery. It's a great fairly long but thin edge on galaxy that lies just under the magnificant galaxy NGC4088. Surface is pretty high and seems quite even. There's a hint of some motting on the edges.

      NGC4088: Wow this is a killer galaxy. I've seen it once before in November of 2006 but it was logged as "no comment" due to a dead laptop battery. This galaxy is very large and very mottled. I believe it's a tilted spiral galaxy due to only seeing great mottling but not spirals. Surface brightness is high and even throughout. Tonight there's a stellar bright supernova in near center of the galaxy. Bright galaxy NGC4085 lies just below with 2 bright stars.

      NGC5728: Great bright galaxy with high surface brightness. Medium sized, elongated. Some mottling visible. Has a distinct core. There's a 14th magnitude supernova that I believe I see in the surface on the left of the core. Appears stellar.


      It's 3:39AM now...I'm TIRED!
    • Ralph Dominica
      That is a most impressive observation report, CJ. I m very glad that my deep cycle battery failed and I had to abandon my scope. It gave me the opportunity to
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 18, 2009
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        That is a most impressive observation report, CJ. I'm very glad that my deep cycle battery failed and I had to abandon my scope. It gave me the opportunity to get out and chat about and share views with everyone. It was great to talk to folks, Martha and Carol were over by the tree as well. I also enjoyed just walking about under the sky dome and seeing our the rising spring and setting winter constellations. All in all a very pleasant evening.
        Thanks everyone!!
        Ralph D

        --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Wood Jr.(CJ)" <hotmid6@...> wrote:
        >
        > Oh how refreshing tonight was! With the bad weather and working 2 jobs, It's been real hard for me to get outside for a good night. The 14.5" has only made a few trips out this year. Tonight was a spectacular night at the Tuckahoe ballfield. The total attendance tonight was...
        >
        > Don - 25" Obsession
        > Bob - 20" F/6
        > Patrick - 10" Intelli
        > Hunter - 12" Lightbridge
        > Ralph - 8" LX90
        > Dough - C8
        >
        > Jean Paul was there with his small refractor aswell, I didn't take a good look at it to see what it was. I think I heard Martha accross the field but I don't think she brought the 14" Tscope as usual.
        >
        > Tonight the transparency was excellent, The best I've seen it all year. Seeing was so-so but manageable. During steady periods, Powers were accepted up to 250x. For the first time since the beginning of time, There was NO DEW at tuckahoe which very unusual. We all know the famous "Tuckahoe Fog". Dew was a shocking 20% when I left the house at 6pm and 70% when Hunter and I came back at 2:30am. Tonight I logged 15 new galaxies and 4 new planetary nebulas. I'm only posting my notes for each object rather then all the info from Skytools(gets overwhelming after a few logs!).
        >
        > Planetary Nebulas-
        > Abell 35: Very large, difficult PN. It only appears as a subtle glow from the background. Brightest around 2 stars. The nebulosity looks near oval around the 2 stars. Around the oval glow I can see some very faint extensions. There seems to a piece of nebulosity above the main patch that's separeted by a dark gap. Only time when the nebulosity of the nebula is easily detectable is when I move the scope side to side to swing it though the FOV. You can see the background go from being dark to light. It was easier to see with an Orion Ultrablock filter then an OIII because of less light loss with still a strong transmission.
        >
        > Abell 36: I observed this earlier but got sidetracked and forgot to log it. Nebula is large and surprisenly bright. No squinting needed like Abell 35 I observed earlier. A36 responded well to both the ultrablock and OIII but the OIII was slightly better. Central star was really bright, Even visible with a nebula filter. The nebulosity was easier on the left hand side. It appeared as an arc shape. With avertered vision there's an elongated glow visible all around the central star.
        >
        > NGC6072: This planetary is so far down I have to observe it on my knees! Pretty big, Faint unfiltered being so low in the south. Responds great to both the ultrablock and OIII but slightly better with the OIII. Annular with elongation, like a racetrack shape. There's faint extensions visible on the sides.
        >
        > NGC6153: Oh gosh, How did I manage to find this. It's so low to the horizon that I'm sitting in "frog" position. With an OIII filter I can see this very bright plantary through the trees here in the ballfield. Odd thing is, I found it first shot. Hunter thought it was hilarious. The glimpse I seen from this I noticed it was slightly elongated. Don't make me try this again...
        >
        > Galaxies-
        > NGC2274: Small, fairly bright. Looks similar to a PN with the embedded 10th magnitude star. NGC2275 lies just below.
        >
        > NGC2275: Faint, low surface, small. Lies underneath brighter NGC2274.
        >
        > NGC2350: Very small galaxy. Looks very depressing at 92x because of it's size. Bumping the power up to 201x made the view much better. Fairly bright, high surface for it's magnitude. The 11.5 magnitude star involved is stellar.
        >
        > NGC2410: Very small edge on galaxy. Paper thin. Easily detectable at 92x but better seen with higher power. Surface is high in the center but quickly fades out. Fascinating to see a galaxy right next to Castor.
        >
        > NGC2435: Wow it's insane how bright this small galaxy is compared to it's real magnitude. The surface brightness is real high. Most likely cause of this is the star that's involved, which I've caught a few stellar glimpses of it at 201x. What's neat is that it forms a "wishbone" shape with the group of stars in the FOV.
        >
        > NGC2470: Small and bright, elongated. Surface brightness is high, estimate about 12th magnitude. Sits inside a bright square asterism of stars. It sits on the 8th magitude stars thats on the bottom left.
        >
        > NGC2480: Very difficult. Hard to hold steady. Just when you think you got it in arms reach it goes out again. I can only glimpse it at 330x. Sits next to NGC2481.
        >
        > NGC2481: Bright and small elongated edge on galaxy. Slightly brighter in the center. At high power I can suspect some detail. Sits next to a really cool asterism that looks just like a smiley face.
        >
        > NGC2862: Did you think the Silver Needle galaxy is thin? Then you must of never seen this galaxy. My oh my it's one of the thinest edge on galaxies I have ever seen. Surface is bright in the center but difficult to see it elsewise since it's so thin. The edges come in and out of view. A bright 8.6 magnitude star sits just above the galaxy.
        >
        > NGC2942: Small and elongated. Faint with a pretty low surface. Slightly brighter in the center.
        >
        > NGC3049: Fairly small, faint, and elongated. Steady and bright with averted vision.
        >
        > NGC3270: Fairly small bright edge on galaxy with pretty high surface. Surface is mostly even, Slightly brighter in the middle. Elongated. The asteroid Ceres is in the same FOV tonight.
        >
        > NGC4085: Logged once before but no detail written due to a dead laptop battery. It's a great fairly long but thin edge on galaxy that lies just under the magnificant galaxy NGC4088. Surface is pretty high and seems quite even. There's a hint of some motting on the edges.
        >
        > NGC4088: Wow this is a killer galaxy. I've seen it once before in November of 2006 but it was logged as "no comment" due to a dead laptop battery. This galaxy is very large and very mottled. I believe it's a tilted spiral galaxy due to only seeing great mottling but not spirals. Surface brightness is high and even throughout. Tonight there's a stellar bright supernova in near center of the galaxy. Bright galaxy NGC4085 lies just below with 2 bright stars.
        >
        > NGC5728: Great bright galaxy with high surface brightness. Medium sized, elongated. Some mottling visible. Has a distinct core. There's a 14th magnitude supernova that I believe I see in the surface on the left of the core. Appears stellar.
        >
        >
        > It's 3:39AM now...I'm TIRED!
        >
      • Jean-Paul Richard
        Yes it was an excellent evening. Thanks to Don for the arrangements. CJ: the small refractor is an 800 mm scope used only for guiding. A camera and lens was
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 18, 2009
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          Yes it was an excellent evening. Thanks to Don for the
          arrangements.
          CJ: the small refractor is an 800 mm scope used only for guiding.
          A camera and lens was also attached to the Meade LDX75 GOTO
          polar mount also. That rather inexpensive mount tracked the stars very
          well with no elongation of stars with the 400mm photo lens
          and without guiding.
          My extensive preparation for photo with guiding with a Meade
          DSI III on the 800mm telescope did not provide success.
          I think I forgot to set the Autostar (computer of the mount) to
          "object". Perhaps I should just look at the Hubble pictures on
          the web and go to bed early.....  ;-)
           Tuckahoe can be remarkable indeed and the company was great !
          Jean-Paul


          Ralph Dominica wrote:

          That is a most impressive observation report, CJ. I'm very glad that my deep cycle battery failed and I had to abandon my scope. It gave me the opportunity to get out and chat about and share views with everyone. It was great to talk to folks, Martha and Carol were over by the tree as well. I also enjoyed just walking about under the sky dome and seeing our the rising spring and setting winter constellations. All in all a very pleasant evening.
          Thanks everyone!!
          Ralph D

          --- In delmarvastargazers@ yahoogroups. com, "Charles Wood Jr.(CJ)" <hotmid6@... > wrote:
          >
          > Oh how refreshing tonight was! With the bad weather and working 2 jobs, It's been real hard for me to get outside for a good night. The 14.5" has only made a few trips out this year. Tonight was a spectacular night at the Tuckahoe ballfield. The total attendance tonight was...
          >
          > Don - 25" Obsession
          > Bob - 20" F/6
          > Patrick - 10" Intelli
          > Hunter - 12" Lightbridge
          > Ralph - 8" LX90
          > Dough - C8
          >
          > Jean Paul was there with his small refractor aswell, I didn't take a good look at it to see what it was. I think I heard Martha accross the field but I don't think she brought the 14" Tscope as usual.
          >
          > Tonight the transparency was excellent, The best I've seen it all year. Seeing was so-so but manageable. During steady periods, Powers were accepted up to 250x. For the first time since the beginning of time, There was NO DEW at tuckahoe which very unusual. We all know the famous "Tuckahoe Fog". Dew was a shocking 20% when I left the house at 6pm and 70% when Hunter and I came back at 2:30am. Tonight I logged 15 new galaxies and 4 new planetary nebulas. I'm only posting my notes for each object rather then all the info from Skytools(gets overwhelming after a few logs!).
          >
          > Planetary Nebulas-
          > Abell 35: Very large, difficult PN. It only appears as a subtle glow from the background. Brightest around 2 stars. The nebulosity looks near oval around the 2 stars. Around the oval glow I can see some very faint extensions. There seems to a piece of nebulosity above the main patch that's separeted by a dark gap. Only time when the nebulosity of the nebula is easily detectable is when I move the scope side to side to swing it though the FOV. You can see the background go from being dark to light. It was easier to see with an Orion Ultrablock filter then an OIII because of less light loss with still a strong transmission.
          >
          > Abell 36: I observed this earlier but got sidetracked and forgot to log it. Nebula is large and surprisenly bright. No squinting needed like Abell 35 I observed earlier. A36 responded well to both the ultrablock and OIII but the OIII was slightly better. Central star was really bright, Even visible with a nebula filter. The nebulosity was easier on the left hand side. It appeared as an arc shape. With avertered vision there's an elongated glow visible all around the central star.
          >
          > NGC6072: This planetary is so far down I have to observe it on my knees! Pretty big, Faint unfiltered being so low in the south. Responds great to both the ultrablock and OIII but slightly better with the OIII. Annular with elongation, like a racetrack shape. There's faint extensions visible on the sides.
          >
          > NGC6153: Oh gosh, How did I manage to find this. It's so low to the horizon that I'm sitting in "frog" position. With an OIII filter I can see this very bright plantary through the trees here in the ballfield. Odd thing is, I found it first shot. Hunter thought it was hilarious. The glimpse I seen from this I noticed it was slightly elongated. Don't make me try this again...
          >
          > Galaxies-
          > NGC2274: Small, fairly bright. Looks similar to a PN with the embedded 10th magnitude star. NGC2275 lies just below.
          >
          > NGC2275: Faint, low surface, small. Lies underneath brighter NGC2274.
          >
          > NGC2350: Very small galaxy. Looks very depressing at 92x because of it's size. Bumping the power up to 201x made the view much better. Fairly bright, high surface for it's magnitude. The 11.5 magnitude star involved is stellar.
          >
          > NGC2410: Very small edge on galaxy. Paper thin. Easily detectable at 92x but better seen with higher power. Surface is high in the center but quickly fades out. Fascinating to see a galaxy right next to Castor.
          >
          > NGC2435: Wow it's insane how bright this small galaxy is compared to it's real magnitude. The surface brightness is real high. Most likely cause of this is the star that's involved, which I've caught a few stellar glimpses of it at 201x. What's neat is that it forms a "wishbone" shape with the group of stars in the FOV.
          >
          > NGC2470: Small and bright, elongated. Surface brightness is high, estimate about 12th magnitude. Sits inside a bright square asterism of stars. It sits on the 8th magitude stars thats on the bottom left.
          >
          > NGC2480: Very difficult. Hard to hold steady. Just when you think you got it in arms reach it goes out again. I can only glimpse it at 330x. Sits next to NGC2481.
          >
          > NGC2481: Bright and small elongated edge on galaxy. Slightly brighter in the center. At high power I can suspect some detail. Sits next to a really cool asterism that looks just like a smiley face.
          >
          > NGC2862: Did you think the Silver Needle galaxy is thin? Then you must of never seen this galaxy. My oh my it's one of the thinest edge on galaxies I have ever seen. Surface is bright in the center but difficult to see it elsewise since it's so thin. The edges come in and out of view. A bright 8.6 magnitude star sits just above the galaxy.
          >
          > NGC2942: Small and elongated. Faint with a pretty low surface. Slightly brighter in the center.
          >
          > NGC3049: Fairly small, faint, and elongated. Steady and bright with averted vision.
          >
          > NGC3270: Fairly small bright edge on galaxy with pretty high surface. Surface is mostly even, Slightly brighter in the middle. Elongated. The asteroid Ceres is in the same FOV tonight.
          >
          > NGC4085: Logged once before but no detail written due to a dead laptop battery. It's a great fairly long but thin edge on galaxy that lies just under the magnificant galaxy NGC4088. Surface is pretty high and seems quite even. There's a hint of some motting on the edges.
          >
          > NGC4088: Wow this is a killer galaxy. I've seen it once before in November of 2006 but it was logged as "no comment" due to a dead laptop battery. This galaxy is very large and very mottled. I believe it's a tilted spiral galaxy due to only seeing great mottling but not spirals. Surface brightness is high and even throughout. Tonight there's a stellar bright supernova in near center of the galaxy. Bright galaxy NGC4085 lies just below with 2 bright stars.
          >
          > NGC5728: Great bright galaxy with high surface brightness. Medium sized, elongated. Some mottling visible. Has a distinct core. There's a 14th magnitude supernova that I believe I see in the surface on the left of the core. Appears stellar.
          >
          >
          > It's 3:39AM now...I'm TIRED!
          >


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