Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: last night

Expand Messages
  • Don R Surles
    2008 finally produced a great night for star gazing. Last night Cal Estrada, Herman Kline and I met at the Blackbird Forest site for some much needed
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 30, 2008

      2008 finally produced a great night for star gazing.  Last night Cal Estrada, Herman Kline and I met at the Blackbird Forest site for some much needed stargazing therapy.

      The sky was clear, the temps very nice for late December...we did have some frost by the time we departed...but there was no wind, no bugs, no dew.  What more could one ask for?

      One could ask for a better memory on the directions for assembling the scope...I forgot to put the protective "skirt" on my 25"er which means removing the upper cage assembly...and then I put the upper cage assembly on 90 degrees south which means the eyepiece would be upside down...so I had to remove and re-install the cage assembly again...lots of activity running up and down the ladder.

      But the sky waited for us...there was a beautiful display of Mercury, Jupiter,  Crescent Moon,  and Venus in the West-southwest...Venus was really bright.  And in the next two days the crescent moon will come very close to Venus...watch for the closest approach Dec 31.

      We did the normal easy hi-lights...I also forgot my star charts.  The Veil, M31, M33, M15...and many others were great.   Cal had never  seen M33 (pinwheel) so I found it for him...straight up with a long dob is not easy but I did find it.  The open clusters in Auriga and Gemini are still there and still very beautiful.  The old double stars are still double.

      The one object I wanted to see was M42 (Orion Nebula) as it approached the meridian...and it did not disappoint.  The nebula is absolutely astounding in the 25 with a 20mm Nagler.  Very beautiful.

      Cal wanted to see the Horsehead so we put the Horsehead filter on a 32 TV plossl and we both looked and we both did not see the elusive cayuse.  Maybe next time.

      So, with cold feet and empty stomachs we decided to pack it in and find a warmer environment.

      When I got home my cat, Sable, needed to be held.  She gave me a good sniffing and meowed, "yep, you've been star gazing again.  you got that 'nagler' smell on your hands."

      See you at the meeting Jan 6, 2009.

      Don...

      This communication is for use by the intended recipient and contains
      information that may be Privileged, confidential or copyrighted under
      applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
      formally notified that any use, copying or distribution of this e-mail,
      in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Please notify the sender by
      return e-mail and delete this e-mail from your system. Unless explicitly
      and conspicuously designated as "E-Contract Intended", this e-mail does
      not constitute a contract offer, a contract amendment, or an acceptance
      of a contract offer. This e-mail does not constitute a consent to the
      use of sender's contact information for direct marketing purposes or for
      transfers of data to third parties.
      
      Francais Deutsch Italiano  Espanol  Portugues  Japanese  Chinese  Korean
      
                 http://www.DuPont.com/corp/email_disclaimer.html
      
    • Michael Lecuyer
      Last night and this morning were quite nice - near Tuckahoe quality in Viola, DE as well. Early in the evening I poked around the Pegasus galaxies near it s
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 30, 2008
        Last night and this morning were quite nice - near Tuckahoe quality in
        Viola, DE as well. Early in the evening I poked around the Pegasus
        galaxies near it's square of stars but spent most of my time around the
        Rosette and around the large NGC 2264 to its north. A good seven hours
        under the stars with the 12" Discovery telescope.

        The SQM read around 20.05 which is pretty good for a back yard in town.
        I get about 20.90 at Tuckahoe. For some reason Jean-Paul Richard's SQM
        reads a magnitude greater there.

        Hubble's Variable Nebula (HVN) hasn't varied enough for me to see any
        changes over two months. On the other side of NGC 2245 is another small
        bright nebula that closely resembles HVN. So close that I had to go back
        and check to see that I hadn't 'rediscovered' HVN accidentally. NGC
        2245's a little smaller and also looks like a comet with a broad tail.
        Both nebula's have stars at the head.

        I did wander off from the area for a while when Gina showed up to
        explore Orion. We also visited the Crab Nebula and the Triangulum Galaxy
        (M 33) which says hello to all the Stargazers.

        Don R Surles wrote:
        > 2008 finally produced a great night for star gazing. Last night Cal
        > Estrada, Herman Kline and I met at the Blackbird Forest site for some
        > much needed stargazing therapy.
        >
        > The sky was clear, the temps very nice for late December...we did have
        > some frost by the time we departed...but there was no wind, no bugs, no
        > dew. What more could one ask for?
      • Tim Milligan
        There must of been something in the air that nignt, I also went out on my back deck with my 8 Dob to look at the Orion neb., and the clusters M35,M36,M37,
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 2, 2009
          There must of been something in the air that nignt, I also went out
          on my back deck with my 8" Dob to look at the Orion neb., and the
          clusters M35,M36,M37, and M38.

          Tim

          --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, Michael Lecuyer <mjl@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Last night and this morning were quite nice - near Tuckahoe quality
          in
          > Viola, DE as well. Early in the evening I poked around the Pegasus
          > galaxies near it's square of stars but spent most of my time around
          the
          > Rosette and around the large NGC 2264 to its north. A good seven
          hours
          > under the stars with the 12" Discovery telescope.
          >
          > The SQM read around 20.05 which is pretty good for a back yard in
          town.
          > I get about 20.90 at Tuckahoe. For some reason Jean-Paul Richard's
          SQM
          > reads a magnitude greater there.
          >
          > Hubble's Variable Nebula (HVN) hasn't varied enough for me to see
          any
          > changes over two months. On the other side of NGC 2245 is another
          small
          > bright nebula that closely resembles HVN. So close that I had to go
          back
          > and check to see that I hadn't 'rediscovered' HVN accidentally. NGC
          > 2245's a little smaller and also looks like a comet with a broad
          tail.
          > Both nebula's have stars at the head.
          >
          > I did wander off from the area for a while when Gina showed up to
          > explore Orion. We also visited the Crab Nebula and the Triangulum
          Galaxy
          > (M 33) which says hello to all the Stargazers.
          >
          > Don R Surles wrote:
          > > 2008 finally produced a great night for star gazing. Last night
          Cal
          > > Estrada, Herman Kline and I met at the Blackbird Forest site for
          some
          > > much needed stargazing therapy.
          > >
          > > The sky was clear, the temps very nice for late December...we did
          have
          > > some frost by the time we departed...but there was no wind, no
          bugs, no
          > > dew. What more could one ask for?
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.