Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Arctic Circle Solar Eclipse

Expand Messages
  • kentblackwell
    August 1, 2008 Eclipse Day Arctic Circle 77-deg 46 44 E 50-deg 44.2 It was with great anticipation all the passengers and crew of the cruise ship M/V
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 2, 2008
      August 1, 2008 Eclipse Day
      Arctic Circle
      77-deg 46' 44"
      E 50-deg 44.2'

      It was with great anticipation all the passengers and crew of the
      cruise ship M/V Discovery waited witnessing the August 1, 2008 total
      solar eclipse. The morning began with a very cold wind blowing across
      the aft deck of the ship. That, combined with clouds and fog are
      things no one wants to see on eclipse day. We all hoped to sail out
      of the gloomy weather but as we approached the eclipse centerline it
      became quite apparent that we would, indeed, miss experiencing this
      eclipse in a clear sky. About sixty passengers braved the frigid
      temperature on the aft deck of the ship. At the beginning of the
      eclipse the temperature was 47-degrees F. As the eclipse progressed
      the temperature began to fall, reaching a low of 39-degrees at mid-
      totality. Couple this with 25-mph winds and that equates to a very
      cold nearly zero degrees temperature for August the 1st!

      As totality approached I couldn't believe how dark it was getting. It
      was, without a doubt the darkest eclipse of the twelve total eclipses
      I have witnessed. My Sky Quality Meter read 13.7, pretty dark for a
      reading in the middle of the day!

      Despite the clouds, fog and cold damp air the long trip from the
      state of Virginia in the USA to the Arctic Circle was well worth it.
      It was certainly the most relaxed I have been at any other eclipse. I
      usually am worrying about aligning my telescope to the eclipsed sun,
      fidgeting with camera settings and other worries that accompany
      viewing in a clear sky. Even more rewarding was sharing such an
      experience with so many wonderful people, people whom, after 10 days
      together have become a family. Despite the clouds we were still
      rewarded with the most spectacular event nature has to offer. Robert
      Hitt and I have no regrets.

      Kent Blackwell
    • Ralph Dominica
      Hi Kent Thank you for providing the descriptive detail of your eclipse excursion. It sounds like a great experience. Sky quality meter reading of 13.7....wow!
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2008
        Hi Kent
        Thank you for providing the descriptive detail of your eclipse
        excursion. It sounds like a great experience. Sky quality meter
        reading of 13.7....wow!
        cheers
        Ralph D

        --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, "kentblackwell" <kent@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > August 1, 2008 Eclipse Day
        > Arctic Circle
        > 77-deg 46' 44"
        > E 50-deg 44.2'
        >
        > It was with great anticipation all the passengers and crew of the
        > cruise ship M/V Discovery waited witnessing the August 1, 2008
        total
        > solar eclipse. The morning began with a very cold wind blowing
        across
        > the aft deck of the ship. That, combined with clouds and fog are
        > things no one wants to see on eclipse day. We all hoped to sail out
        > of the gloomy weather but as we approached the eclipse centerline
        it
        > became quite apparent that we would, indeed, miss experiencing this
        > eclipse in a clear sky. About sixty passengers braved the frigid
        > temperature on the aft deck of the ship. At the beginning of the
        > eclipse the temperature was 47-degrees F. As the eclipse progressed
        > the temperature began to fall, reaching a low of 39-degrees at mid-
        > totality. Couple this with 25-mph winds and that equates to a very
        > cold nearly zero degrees temperature for August the 1st!
        >
        > As totality approached I couldn't believe how dark it was getting.
        It
        > was, without a doubt the darkest eclipse of the twelve total
        eclipses
        > I have witnessed. My Sky Quality Meter read 13.7, pretty dark for a
        > reading in the middle of the day!
        >
        > Despite the clouds, fog and cold damp air the long trip from the
        > state of Virginia in the USA to the Arctic Circle was well worth
        it.
        > It was certainly the most relaxed I have been at any other eclipse.
        I
        > usually am worrying about aligning my telescope to the eclipsed
        sun,
        > fidgeting with camera settings and other worries that accompany
        > viewing in a clear sky. Even more rewarding was sharing such an
        > experience with so many wonderful people, people whom, after 10
        days
        > together have become a family. Despite the clouds we were still
        > rewarded with the most spectacular event nature has to offer.
        Robert
        > Hitt and I have no regrets.
        >
        > Kent Blackwell
        >
      • Jerry Truitt
        Thanks Kent. We all live vicariously through you and your eclipse cruises. I hope you make it to the fall star party with a CD packed with pictures and video.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 3, 2008
          Thanks Kent. We all live vicariously through you and your eclipse
          cruises. I hope you make it to the fall star party with a CD packed
          with pictures and video. We really appreciate you keeping us updated.

          Jerry

          --- In delmarvastargazers@yahoogroups.com, "kentblackwell" <kent@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > August 1, 2008 Eclipse Day
          > Arctic Circle
          > 77-deg 46' 44"
          > E 50-deg 44.2'
          >
          > It was with great anticipation all the passengers and crew of the
          > cruise ship M/V Discovery waited witnessing the August 1, 2008
          total
          > solar eclipse. The morning began with a very cold wind blowing
          across
          > the aft deck of the ship. That, combined with clouds and fog are
          > things no one wants to see on eclipse day. We all hoped to sail out
          > of the gloomy weather but as we approached the eclipse centerline
          it
          > became quite apparent that we would, indeed, miss experiencing this
          > eclipse in a clear sky. About sixty passengers braved the frigid
          > temperature on the aft deck of the ship. At the beginning of the
          > eclipse the temperature was 47-degrees F. As the eclipse progressed
          > the temperature began to fall, reaching a low of 39-degrees at mid-
          > totality. Couple this with 25-mph winds and that equates to a very
          > cold nearly zero degrees temperature for August the 1st!
          >
          > As totality approached I couldn't believe how dark it was getting.
          It
          > was, without a doubt the darkest eclipse of the twelve total
          eclipses
          > I have witnessed. My Sky Quality Meter read 13.7, pretty dark for a
          > reading in the middle of the day!
          >
          > Despite the clouds, fog and cold damp air the long trip from the
          > state of Virginia in the USA to the Arctic Circle was well worth
          it.
          > It was certainly the most relaxed I have been at any other eclipse.
          I
          > usually am worrying about aligning my telescope to the eclipsed
          sun,
          > fidgeting with camera settings and other worries that accompany
          > viewing in a clear sky. Even more rewarding was sharing such an
          > experience with so many wonderful people, people whom, after 10
          days
          > together have become a family. Despite the clouds we were still
          > rewarded with the most spectacular event nature has to offer.
          Robert
          > Hitt and I have no regrets.
          >
          > Kent Blackwell
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.